North Europe

The experience of East European migrants in the UK suggests that there is racism towards newcomers regardless of racial difference

Jon Fox looks at the racialisation of migration in the UK. While immigration policy can be seen as managed to maximise economic benefits, it is also done in a way that seeks to minimise social disturbances. Migrants are often portrayed in the tabloids not as upstanding workers trying to eke out a living, but as dangerous social parasites preying on their well-meaning hosts. However, for tabloids, shared […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

The polarised nature of the Dutch party system and the volatility of the electorate ensure that any ‘victory for the centre’ is likely to be short-lived.

Last week’s elections in the Netherlands saw the mainstream parties of the centre make significant gains over the far-right PVV, led by Geert Wilders. André Krouwel argues that despite the success of the mainstream parties, there is little evidence that the result signifies a return to political stability for the country. The party system is becoming increasingly polarised and the […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

The Eurozone crisis means Britain must now leave the EU

Last week a cross-party campaign was launched in the UK calling for a referendum on the country’s membership of the European Union. Patrick Minford argues that the current costs of the UK’s membership far outweigh any benefits, and that the framework within Europe that is now evolving to cope with the Eurozone crisis is likely to impose even greater costs […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

An ageing population means that new solutions are foreseen to ensure long term care continues to be sustainable in the Netherlands

The Netherlands spends the second most per-capita on health in Europe, and healthcare was a very important issue in the recent Dutch elections. Hans Maarse looks at the future of long term care in the Netherlands, which makes up for more than 20 per cent of expenditure on healthcare. With an ageing population, simply spending more on healthcare is no […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

The Dutch elections are a victory for pro-European parties, but there is growing opposition to the EU’s bailout policies.

Early results from Wednesday’s elections in the Netherlands show a large fall in support for the radical-right Party for Freedom (PVV), led by Geert Wilders, and gains for the two mainstream parties, the VVD and PvdA. Cas Mudde argues that despite Dutch voters rejecting the broadly Eurosceptic platform of the PVV, Eurosceptic sentiment within the country is growing and the […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

Five minutes with Lord Boswell of the UK’s House of Lords’ EU Committee – “We have some arguably existential crises in the European Union”

The UK’s House of Lords’ EU Committee aims to hold the UK government to account for its actions at the EU level, and also considers EU related documents prior to decisions being made on them. In an interview with EUROPP editor Chris Gilson, Committee Chairman Lord Boswell discusses how the Eurozone crisis has affected the work of the House of […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

David Cameron should not bow to Eurosceptic pressures from his own party to replace David Lidington as Minister for Europe.

In the UK there is growing support within the Conservative Party for David Cameron to appoint a new Minister for Europe. Tim Bale assesses why the incumbent minister, David Lidington, is so unpalatable to Conservative MPs, noting that his moderation and pragmatism work against him with Tory Eurosceptics, who not only misunderstand the nature of the EU’s impact on member […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

A new German constitution could pave the way for further European integration including Eurobonds

Many commentators have proposed greater financial integration in Europe, such as introducing Eurobonds and debt mutualisation, as the solution to the Eurozone crisis. Katinka Barysch argues that for Germany to agree to these measures, it would have to adopt a new constitution, likely following a national referendum. But, given the complexity of policymaking in Germany, the road to a new […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

What the Olympics didn’t say about Britain’s place in the world

Danny Boyle’s Olympic opening ceremony left the British media swooning, with much of the international media likewise impressed, if slightly befuddled. However, Eric Taylor Woods argues that the event organisers missed a chance to show the positive and negative aspects of Britain’s central role in world history. Since the conclusion of the 2012 London Olympics, much has been written about what this […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

Germany may be heading towards a referendum on further European integration

Is Germany heading towards a referendum? Philine Schuseil argues that the question of the compatibility of the German constitution with further European integration is at the heart of current debates in Germany. The Federal Constitutional Court (FCC) will decide in September on whether the European Stability Mechanism (ESM) exceeds the limits of the Basic Law. Meanwhile, a debate on holding a […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

Iceland’s economy has entered a period of recovery since 2011, however the on-going Icesave dispute has reduced public support for EU membership and the country’s government.

Benjamin Leruth documents the evolution of Iceland’s economy since the beginning of the country’s financial crisis in 2008. Although there were severe consequences in the short-term, the economy has entered a period of recovery since 2011. While the economic situation has improved, the Icesave dispute between Iceland and the governments of the UK and the Netherlands remains to be resolved. […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

The London Olympics – making a ‘piece of city’

Ricky Burdett discusses the Olympics’ ‘Great Leap Eastwards’ and argues that London is on its way to improving on the pattern of social inequality. However, the journey will be long and fraught with challenges. City government needs to retain control and ownership of the land, and put in place checks and balances to ensure that land values and gentrification do not […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

The average cost overrun for producing the Olympic Games has been more than 200% since 1976

Will Jennings explores the history of vast cost overruns for Olympic Games. He isolates three common factors behind grossly underestimated costs since 1976: the bid process, uncontrolled growth in project specifications, and the failure to identify and manage risk. As recently as March, the UK’s Public Accounts Committee criticised the organizers of London 2012 for its rising security bill: “It is staggering that the original estimates […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

Welfare systems are increasingly returning to 19th century ideas in a bid to encourage individuals to participate in the labour market.

Christina May places current debates on welfare reform within their historical context. Looking back to approaches from the 19th century, she concludes that we are now witnessing a return to the ideas of the past, where the key aim of a welfare system was to make individuals fit to participate in the labour market, rather than to aid the victims […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

Euroscepticism is most common in Wales, the Midlands and among the over-60s; however the wording of any potential referendum question on EU membership will be crucial for the result.

Support is growing for a referendum on the UK’s membership of the European Union. Thomas Raines examines the demographics of British Euroscepticism and concludes that although some groups show strong support for the UK’s withdrawal, others, such as businesses, government, NGOs and the media oppose a referendum, and would vote to stay within the EU if one were held. In […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

Book review: Coin, Kirk, Class and Kin: Emigration, Social Change and Identity in Southern Scotland

There are many detailed accounts of nineteenth-century emigrants, of their journeys and settlements abroad – but what of those they left behind? This book delves into the heart of Georgian Britain to explore the role that the men and women of the Scottish Borders played in the mass emigration of the early nineteenth century. Ewen Cameron finds that this study adds great depth […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

The UK’s European Union Act is a good example of a bad law

Jo Murkens argues that the UK’s European Union Act of 2011 should be viewed as a failed statute. Amongst other flaws the Act does not truly empower the people and is legally inconsistent. If there was one area in which the two coalition parties needed to produce a workable agreement as a matter of priority after the May 2010 election, it was […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

Despite on-going accession negotiations, EU membership for Iceland is far from a certainty.

In spite of the Eurozone crisis, the EU’s negotiations with potential accession countries continue. Benjamin Leruth looks at Iceland’s prospects for accession, finding that three years after accession talks began, the majority of Icelanders are not in favour of joining the EU. Disputes over economic, agricultural, and fisheries policies present significant challenges to the negotiations, and may yet fuel opposition […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

Euroscepticism is now a powerful force for the radical right in the UK – and UKIP is well placed to harness it

UKIP has watched as its competitors on the mainstream and radical right have exited the electoral field. Robert Ford writes that previously Conservative-voting ‘strategic Eurosceptics’ along with the BNP’s ‘polite xenophobes’ have joined UKIP’s ranks giving Nigel Farage and his party an unprecedented political opportunity. Radical right parties mobilise a complex mix of resentments, against immigration and multiculturalism, corrupt and […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share

The trial of Anders Breivik shows that we need a better understanding of what drives right-wing extremist violence

Rachel Briggs and Matthew Goodwin explore some of the factors that drive individuals to adopt a right-wing extremist identity and maintain that more research needs to be conducted into why some engage in violent activities.  The trial of Anders Breivik – and its forthcoming conclusion – has sparked a resurgence of interest in one area of research that is often ignored by […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Share