Author Archives: Leila Nasr

Jun 29 2016

Peruvian IDPs and the Search for Holistic Transitional Justice

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By Juan Pablo Perez-Leon-Acevedo* Peru’s internal armed conflict (1980-2000) took place between the subversive Shining Path and state forces, causing the forced displacement of between half to one million people, mainly from indigenous groups. Approximately half of those people managed … Continue reading

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May 19 2016

Limiting Sovereignty and Legitimising Intervention

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By Nora Jaber* International law’s elevated focus on the protection of human rights has resulted in a shift from a purely state-centered body of law to one that is increasingly focused on individual rights. This has been accompanied by a … Continue reading

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May 9 2016

Constitutional Rights Law and its Limitations: Topical Examples

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By Anthony Kennelly* One consequence of the post-World War II ‘rights revolution’ is the ever growing use of constitutional law to protect fundamental rights. The goal of this is not only to protect such rights by judicial enforcement, at which … Continue reading

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Apr 25 2016

Transborder Abduction of Hong Kong Booksellers: Implications under International Law

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By Sean Yau Shun Ming* In late 2015, five co-owners of a Hong Kong bookstore – specialising in selling Chinese political books mostly banned in China – all disappeared. Among them, the international community has paid considerable attention to Gui … Continue reading

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Apr 18 2016

A Conversation on Race (Part 3): ‘Race, UK Policy and the Chagos Islander’s case post-2000’

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The following article is the third and final post in a three-week series on the LSE Human Rights Blog entitled ‘A Conversation on Race’. This series has been compiled by MSc Human Rights candidate Allie Funk (A.Funk@lse.ac.uk).  By Cat Gough* “The Foreign … Continue reading

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Apr 11 2016

A Conversation on Race (Part 2): ‘Incarceration of Black Lives in America’

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The following article is the second in a three-week series on the LSE Human Rights Blog entitled ‘A Conversation on Race’. By Jacqueline Stein* To a foreigner, American incarceration rates must be haunting. Figures today report American prison rates toping world charts, … Continue reading

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Apr 4 2016

A Conversation on Race (Part 1): ‘The Geographies of Racism’

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The following podcast episodes are the first in a three-week series on the LSE Human Rights Blog entitled ‘A Conversation on Race’. This special program has been created by Sound Minds Radio – a research communication project funded by the Community … Continue reading

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Mar 10 2016

Dismantling labels: Colombia’s long-term challenge towards peace

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By Maria Hoyos-Carrero* After fifty years of war the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the longest operating left-wing guerrilla army in the hemisphere, have agreed to sign a peace accord by the end of this … Continue reading

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Mar 3 2016

Alone in the Jungle

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By Daniel Sippel* About 30 miles away from Dover, Rambo asks Liz for new shoes. He needs them to jump on a lorry, which is supposed to take him to his paradise. Last week, a friend of Rambo’s died when … Continue reading

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Feb 25 2016

Can we predict a humanitarian emergency?

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By Nicolò Maganza* Since the end of the Cold War, the humanitarian field has witnessed the emergence of new early warning systems, as well as the improvement of old ones, the purpose being to alert us of imminent humanitarian emergencies. … Continue reading

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