About Mark S. Langevin

Mark S. Langevin is Senior Fellow at the Schar School of Policy and Government, George Mason University, and Director of Brazilworks. Follow him on Twitter @brazil_works or contact him via mark@brazilworks.net.
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    Desemprego pode se tornar o calcanhar de Aquiles de Bolsonaro no Brasil

Desemprego pode se tornar o calcanhar de Aquiles de Bolsonaro no Brasil

O presidente Bolsonaro alcançou o sucesso eleitoral culpando o Partido dos Trabalhadores e o establishment político pelo naufrágio do país. No entanto, se o presidente brasileiro não conseguir combater o desemprego em breve, as eleições municipais de 2020 poderão se tornar um referendo nacional sobre o estado da economia e a aprovação presidencial, argumentam Mark S. Langevin (George Mason University) e Elisa Antunes (BrazilWorks).

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    Wilderness to wildest dreams: the remarkable rise of Bolsonaro’s Social Liberal Party in Brazil

Wilderness to wildest dreams: the remarkable rise of Bolsonaro’s Social Liberal Party in Brazil

The same disruptive tactics that swept the PSL and Bolsonaro into power may also undermine their capacity to formulate and negotiate the president’s ambitious legislative agenda, write Mark S. Langevin (George Mason University) and Edmund Ruge in the first of a two-part series on the roots and the role of the Partido Liberal Social.

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    Brazil elections 2018: the five risks facing President Bolsonaro

Brazil elections 2018: the five risks facing President Bolsonaro

Jair Bolsonaro’s remarkable rise to the presidency has already caused a significant shake-up of Brazilian politics. But in the longer term, a looming fiscal catastrophe and sky-high expectations on crime and corruption could lead to political instability or even a constitutional crisis, writes Mark S. Langevin (George Mason University).

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    Brazil elections 2018: who will win the race for second place behind Bolsonaro?

Brazil elections 2018: who will win the race for second place behind Bolsonaro?

With Jair Bolsonaro certain to reach the second round of Brazil’s elections in October 2018, the real issue now is which of the other 12 candidates will join him. Mark S. Langevin (George Mason University) analyses the key factors that will shape the prospects of Bolsonaro’s main rivals: Marina Silva, Geraldo Alckmin, Ciro Gomes, and especially Lula’s hand-picked candidate Fernando Haddad.

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    Brazil elections 2018: could a lack of legitimacy make the country ungovernable?

Brazil elections 2018: could a lack of legitimacy make the country ungovernable?

Brazil’s elections in October 2018 are likely to see unusually high levels of abstention. With legitimacy undermined both by the vast Lava Jato corruption scandal and by the horse-trading typical of Brazil’s hotly contested political system, the effectiveness of governance is likely to deteriorate even further, writes Mark S. Langevin (George Mason University).

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    When the mega-dam breaks: shaping the future of environmental licensing in Brazil

When the mega-dam breaks: shaping the future of environmental licensing in Brazil

If the problems and potential of environmental licensing are not taken seriously in this year’s policy debates and electoral campaigns, future development and economic recovery could trigger environmental degradation far more serious than any single mega-dam project, write Mark S. Langevin and Olivia Smith (both George Washington University).

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    Brazil’s crisis of political legitimacy has opened the door to rant-and-rave populist Jair Bolsonaro

Brazil’s crisis of political legitimacy has opened the door to rant-and-rave populist Jair Bolsonaro

Though Bolsonaro has little relevant experience, a poor record as a legislator, and few economic, fiscal, or foreign-policy proposals, his ability to capitalise on widespread hostility to Brazilian politics and politicians has made him the second most popular candidate for the 2018 presidential election, writes Mark S. Langevin (George Washington University).

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    The Temer government in Brazil lacks the legitimacy required to reform its way back to recovery

The Temer government in Brazil lacks the legitimacy required to reform its way back to recovery

A coordinated political effort to move toward higher labour productivity, higher valued-added activities, and a solid foundation of public education and health services can only be achieved through elections and negotiations between legitimate representatives, writes Mark S. Langevin.

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    Brazilian foreign policy in the Trump era: a chance as much as a challenge

Brazilian foreign policy in the Trump era: a chance as much as a challenge

Trump may represent a challenge to Brazil and multilateralism, but his government also offers unique opportunities for Brazilian foreign policymakers to advance economic integration and expand the nation’s leadership in the international community, writes Mark S. Langevin.