Management with Impact

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    Why global cities are changing the narrative in international trade

Why global cities are changing the narrative in international trade

Services, as opposed to goods, may provide the opportunity for trade diversification that the world is seeking. But this is dependent on the role of global cities, say Professors Saul Estrin and Daniel Shapiro.

Many countries have begun to think about trade diversification. After all, one of the reasons for Brexit was to allow the UK to trade more freely with […]

Understanding how we spend our money

Heather Kappes, Assistant Professor of Marketing at LSE’s Department of Management, spent six weeks during January and February 2019 doing research as part of Live Science at the Science Museum in London. In a time where money is still a taboo topic, Heather wanted to explore people’s attitudes to spending. Here’s what she found out…

My project, billed as ‘The […]

Can words make you cooperate?

Researchers looked at how cooperation can spread within networks and how strategic decision making can be influenced. 

Study participants took part in a series of computer-based games and were presented with different descriptions for the game they played. The participant’s strategies, along with the description of the game given to them, were recorded and analysed to see how varying descriptions […]

3 ways to work smarter

At work it’s often the little things that make a big difference in our success, according to economist, founder, author and LSE alumnus, Saj Jetha.

Traditional economic theory relies on the assumption that humans are rational and – importantly – make logical decisions in their own self-interest (self-regarding). But there’s a fatal flaw in that: humans can be far from rational. We […]

The science of spending

Dr. Heather Kappes investigates how and why we spend our money the way we do, as part of a Live Science residency at the Science Museum.

Across the world, many people aren’t saving enough money to be able to retire from work, or to be prepared for emergencies. Some of these people have very low incomes, but others earn a […]

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    Cultural, administrative, and economic proximity between the UK and Canada should be good for trade

Cultural, administrative, and economic proximity between the UK and Canada should be good for trade

Economists place considerable emphasis on the role of (geographic) distance in explaining the pattern of international trading relationships. Using a metaphor from Newtonian physics, trade and foreign direct investment (FDI) between countries are often seen as being driven by the forces of gravity, encapsulated in the relative size of their markets and the distance between their economies. Moreover, as […]

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    Global cities, multinationals, and trade in the age of Brexit

Global cities, multinationals, and trade in the age of Brexit

This post is the third in a series analysing the prospects for trade and foreign direct investment (FDI) diversification, with a particular focus on the UK and Canada in the age of Brexit. Daniel Shapiro, Saul Estrin, Christine Cote, Klaus Meyer, and Jing Li examine the nature of trade in services using ideas developed in the international business and economic geography literature to explore […]

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    Can the UK capitalise on its service-based economy for trade diversification post Brexit?

Can the UK capitalise on its service-based economy for trade diversification post Brexit?

As concerns increase over the prospects for a positive post-Brexit agreement with the EU on the terms of exit, much attention continues to be focused on the attractiveness and viability of UK trade diversification. Our first post concluded that physical distance still matters in economic relations between countries and that the role of gravity when considering trade in goods, […]

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    Can Brexit defy gravity? It is still much cheaper to trade with neighbouring countries

Can Brexit defy gravity? It is still much cheaper to trade with neighbouring countries

Is the UK locked into economic relationships dominated by geography? Can it reorient its trade and FDI patterns from the slower growing European economy to faster-growing markets in Asia, Latin America and Africa, as promised by the proponents of Brexit? In this article Saul Estrin, Christine Cote (LSE), and Daniel Shapiro (Simon Fraser University) concentrate their attention on trade […]

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    Entrepreneurial activity in the UK is strong, but regionally unbalanced

Entrepreneurial activity in the UK is strong, but regionally unbalanced

Mobilise labour and knowledge and the UK will enjoy a more inclusive and sustainable entrepreneurial society, writes Saul Estrin

 

Experts in the field of entrepreneurship recently met at the London School of Economics to discuss reform strategies proposed in a new policy brief, which seeks to promote entrepreneurship in the UK.

Dr Mark Sanders, Associate Professor at the Utrecht University School of […]