Law

  • Permalink Flood-affected people in Sindh, Pakistan, recipients of UK humanitarian aid in response to the 2010 floods.Gallery

    Protecting small farmers in Pakistan in the wake of the new Seed Act

Protecting small farmers in Pakistan in the wake of the new Seed Act

As a result of the Seed (Amendment) Act, farmer friendly seed policies have been replaced by legislation which favours multinational corporations. Abdul Waheed Jamali discusses why this is a problem, and draws on Sindh as a case study to explore how state governments can support existing public bodies to support small farmers.

Despite much opposition by civil society organisations (CSOs), small […]

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    “The great tragedy in India today is that there is little political will to do away with conservative laws” – Madhav Khosla

“The great tragedy in India today is that there is little political will to do away with conservative laws” – Madhav Khosla

At the second LSE India Summit Madhav Khosla took part in the Constitution Panel, which explored India’s constitutional founding and the extent to which the principles of the Constitution of India have been realised to date. After the panel Alexander Spalding probed him further about the capacity for progressive constitutional reform in India.
What does Ambedkar’s idea of ‘constitutional morality’ […]

May 31st, 2017|Featured, Interviews, Law|Comments Off on “The great tragedy in India today is that there is little political will to do away with conservative laws” – Madhav Khosla|
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    “Despite the prevalence of child abandonment in Pakistan there are no formal structures for adoption in place” – Tahera Hasan

“Despite the prevalence of child abandonment in Pakistan there are no formal structures for adoption in place” – Tahera Hasan

At Pakistan @ 70: LSE Pakistan Summit 2017 Tahera Hasan spoke on the Philanthropy and Institution-Building panel in her capacity as Director of Imkaan Welfare Organisation. After the session Sonali Campion caught up with her to discuss Imkaan’s work and the problem of child abandonment in more detail.
Tell me about Imkaan Welfare Organisation – why was it established and […]

May 24th, 2017|Development, Education, Featured, Gender, Interviews, Law|Comments Off on “Despite the prevalence of child abandonment in Pakistan there are no formal structures for adoption in place” – Tahera Hasan|
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    “I don’t see what is happening within universities as separate from what is happening in the political arena” – Kalpana Kannabiran

“I don’t see what is happening within universities as separate from what is happening in the political arena” – Kalpana Kannabiran

Following the Constitution panel at India @ 70: LSE India Summit 2017 Rebecca Bowers interviewed panellist Kalpana Kannabiran about the narrowing space for freedom of expression on Indian university campuses, the teaching of constitutional law, and the new Disabilities Act.
RB: Given a growing number of incidents on university campuses what can be done to ensure that freedom of expression […]

May 17th, 2017|Education, Featured, Interviews, Law, Politics|Comments Off on “I don’t see what is happening within universities as separate from what is happening in the political arena” – Kalpana Kannabiran|
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    Life in limbo: the Rohingya refugees trapped between Myanmar and Bangladesh

Life in limbo: the Rohingya refugees trapped between Myanmar and Bangladesh

Although Myanmar’s progress towards democracy in recent years has been celebrated, the persecution of the Rohingyas has continued to escalate. Ashraful Azad highlights the serious human rights violations that are causing thousands of them to flee to neighbouring countries such as Bangladesh, which are unwilling and ill-equipped to respond.

Violence against the Rohingyas, an ethnic Muslim minority in Myanmar, has reached a new […]

February 22nd, 2017|Development, Featured, Law, Politics, Security and Foreign Policy|Comments Off on Life in limbo: the Rohingya refugees trapped between Myanmar and Bangladesh|
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    The Sardar Sarovar Dam: Drowning out citizens but who benefits?

The Sardar Sarovar Dam: Drowning out citizens but who benefits?

The controversial damming of the Narmada river in central India goes on, even though the project has been plagued by escalating costs, corruption scandals and protests over human rights and environmental abuses. Yet despite financial, social and environmental deficiencies Defne Gonenc writes that the main beneficiaries are multinationals and large contractors, rather than the hundreds of ordinary Indians who need clean drinking water and […]

February 13th, 2017|Development, Environment, Featured, Law|Comments Off on The Sardar Sarovar Dam: Drowning out citizens but who benefits?|

Will there ever be a Women’s March in Bangladesh?

There has been remarkable and quantifiable progress for Bangladeshi women since the country became independent in 1971, particularly in terms of women’s political representation. But Tasmiah Rahman draws on her own professional research and personal experiences to argue that the connection between women in power and empowerment of women is missing.

The Women’s March on Washington gathered millions of […]

January 30th, 2017|Development, Featured, Gender, Law, LSE, Society and Culture|Comments Off on Will there ever be a Women’s March in Bangladesh?|
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    Book Review: Paper Tiger: Law, Bureaucracy and the Developmental State in Himalayan India by Nayanika Mathur

Book Review: Paper Tiger: Law, Bureaucracy and the Developmental State in Himalayan India by Nayanika Mathur

Following eighteen months of intensive fieldwork, in Paper Tiger: Law, Bureaucracy and the Developmental State in Himalayan India author Nayanika Mathur details the everyday absurdities of bureaucracy in the Himalayan borderlands, showing the frequent gulf between ‘real life’ and the abstract workings of the law. Elisabetta Iob highly recommends this accessible, witty and vividly written book as an outstanding and essential example […]

January 20th, 2017|Book Reviews, Development, Featured, Law|Comments Off on Book Review: Paper Tiger: Law, Bureaucracy and the Developmental State in Himalayan India by Nayanika Mathur|
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    The regressive and restrictive Surrogacy (Regulation) Bill does little to protect women from exploitation

The regressive and restrictive Surrogacy (Regulation) Bill does little to protect women from exploitation

The Surrogacy (Regulation) Bill approved by the Union Cabinet in August 2016 proposes a complete ban on commercial surrogacy and advocates solely its altruistic form. Anjora Sarangi writes there is a dire need to recognise that placing a blanket ban on commercial surrogacy cannot be an overarching solution to the problem of exploitation of women that the practice might result in. She […]

January 4th, 2017|Featured, Gender, Law, LSE|1 Comment|
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    Book Review: Marriage Migration in Asia: Emerging Minorities at the Frontiers of Nation-States edited by Sari K. Ishii

Book Review: Marriage Migration in Asia: Emerging Minorities at the Frontiers of Nation-States edited by Sari K. Ishii

In Marriage Migration in Asia: Emerging Minorities at the Frontiers of Nation-States, editor Sari K. Ishii brings together contributors to explore new and emerging patterns of transnational marriage migration in East and Southeast Asia. This book is a valuable contribution to research that complicates many existing assumptions – such as the perception that it is mainly women from poorer […]

December 9th, 2016|Book Reviews, Featured, Gender, Law, LSE, Society and Culture|Comments Off on Book Review: Marriage Migration in Asia: Emerging Minorities at the Frontiers of Nation-States edited by Sari K. Ishii|

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