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Anisa Zaman

May 5th, 2021

Study Spaces at LSE: The Library versus The Centre Building

0 comments | 2 shares

Estimated reading time: 6 minutes

Anisa Zaman

May 5th, 2021

Study Spaces at LSE: The Library versus The Centre Building

0 comments | 2 shares

Estimated reading time: 6 minutes

Despite it nearly being the start of summer term, I have only recently began using the study spaces on the LSE campus to revise. Over the last two weeks, I have mainly spent my time studying in the Library and the Centre Building – both impressive buildings with plenty of spaces to work. My experiences studying in both buildings have been pretty different, and not what I was expecting at all!

The Library

Looking down from the top of the atrium in the LSE Library (also known as the British Library of Political and Economic Science) in the Lionel Robbins Building

 

The Library was the first thing that really pulled me towards LSE when I first visited, even before I knew what I wanted to study at university. Its key feature has to be its striking staircase (which is quite a trek at times, but has done my calves wonders!) and escalators centred in the middle overlooking thousands of books. The Library definitely is the best place to study if you want easy access to books, tech support and plenty of space to study. It also has plenty of ports to charge your phones and laptops.

 

iRoam laptop loan service. Apple laptops are available during term time from the self-service machine on the first floor of the LSE Library
The LSE LIFE centre on the ground floor of the LSE Library in the Lionel Robbins Building. LSE LIFE is the School’s centre for academic, personal, and professional development. (Photo taken in 2016).

 

However, it can be quite busy at times, especially in group study areas as people move along the stairs and if there are any groups studying together (but there are silent study spaces available). With COVID restrictions in place at the moment and limited spaces, I often see queues outside the Library after 2.30pm. The library recommends students visiting before or after the period of 3-6pm, as this is when it is the busiest. 

 

The Centre Building

LSE Centre Building (CBG).
LSE Centre Building (CBG).

 

The Centre Building is by far my favourite in terms of architecture. It has a modern feel to it, with incredible windows which provide brilliant views of the campus and London. I was able to study both on the 2nd and 10th floors. The 2nd floor had many more study spaces and even though there were limited charging ports, I did have access to one. The 10th floor, with limited seating, did however provide incredible views of London. I was able to see the LSE campus, and all the way to the BT Tower! However, I did not have access to a charging port, which is another story you can read in my previous post, ‘An Afternoon in London’. Both floors were much quieter than the Library and despite the charging port-gate, I quite enjoyed myself!

 

Roof terrace of the Centre Building (CBG) (Photo taken in 2019).

The Verdict

 

I was incredibly productive studying in both buildings. They both had their benefits and their flaws, but are still great places to study. I found that the Library, despite being a bit noisier than I had expected at times, had larger desk space for me to study on and easy access to books. The Centre Building, though not as noisy, did not have large enough desks for me to study on. The flaws and benefits tend to balance out, and I found that where I studied depended on what I needed that day. If I needed access to books and a larger study space, I used the Library, and if I didn’t, then I chose the Centre Building. I also hope to use some of the other study spaces available on campus, including in the New Academic Building (NAB). However, if I did have to make a choice, I am a bit partial to the beautiful views of the Centre Building!

 

Discover and explore more of LSE’s campus from home online.

This post was written in late April 2021. Find LSE’s latest coronavirus guidance.

About the author

Anisa Zaman

A first year BA Geography student, interested in geopolitics and contemporary fiction.

Posted In: LSE | Student life

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