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Ramesh Kugendran

October 5th, 2022

Choosing the right A-Levels can get you one step closer to LSE

10 comments | 2 shares

Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

Ramesh Kugendran

October 5th, 2022

Choosing the right A-Levels can get you one step closer to LSE

10 comments | 2 shares

Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

This blog seeks to provide you with some suggestions on how to pick the best A-Level subjects to get into LSE. So read on to find out the best tips.

“Traditional” vs “non-preferred” subjects

LSE, like many other Russell Group universities, favours conventional subjects regarding A-Levels. But, of course, this is not limited to Mathematics, English and Science, but also to Sociology, Psychology, History and other studies. *To make your life a little easier, you can see the complete list by clicking here * The Undergraduate Admissions Office recommends selecting at least two of your subjects from the traditional list as they will provide you with the best preparation for studying at LSE.

Similarity of subjects 

When picking your A-Level studies, try to acquire a good balance of disciplines to demonstrate that you’re a well-rounded individual who can think critically in complex ways. For example, instead of Economics, Business Studies and Accounting, consider throwing an essay-based subject into the mix, like English or Sociology.

Degree programmes with prerequisites  

Regarding A-Level choices, some degree programmes at the LSE have prerequisites. If you know the exact degree programme you want to do or have a rough idea of what you would like to study, I recommend you check the course’s admission requirements before selecting your A-Levels. For example, BSc Mathematics and Economics requires either “A-level Maths, A-level Further Maths, and one other subject‘ OR ‘A-level Maths, two other courses, and AS-level Further Maths“.

Passion and pressure

The last and most important tip: choose what you are passionate about! I cannot stress how important this is. If you study something that you are not passionate about, you are less likely going to revise for that subject. And also, do not succumb to outside pressure, whether that comes from friends or even family members; please remember it is you who’s going to study the A-Levels, not them!

My personal A-Level experience

Granted, the advice above is all highly subjective and does not fully reflect LSE as I do not work for the Admissions team, but they are some of the prevalent tendencies found with the A-Level selections at LSE. For example, I studied Economics, Mathematics and Sociology for A-Levels, which helped me with my undergraduate degree in International Social and Public Policy. While Sociology and Economics are arguably the most directly connected in terms of theory and subject material, the Mathematics A-Level I took offered a solid foundation for studying statistical analysis in my degree.

Nonetheless, while many of you in Year 11 may have already chosen your A-Level subjects and are set to start on the following chapters of your academic pathways, whether that is college or sixth form, it is not too late to change your mind. You typically have two weeks after the commencement of the semester to swap your subjects, so if you are hesitant about some of your selections after reading the above, you are at liberty to alter them.

If you have any questions about anything I’ve written above, please comment below, where I can respond to any questions you may have. For further details on admissions, plase contact the LSE Undergraduate Admissions team by clicking here.

About the author

Ramesh Kugendran

Welcome to my blog! I'm Ramesh Kugendran, a student of International Social and Public Policy at LSE. As someone who is passionate about Social and Public Policy, I am excited to share my thoughts, insights, and experiences on this blog. Thank you for stopping by and I hope you enjoy reading my blog!

Posted In: Applying: Undergraduate

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