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Matheus

June 7th, 2023

This is what makes the LSE campus stand out

0 comments | 1 shares

Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

Matheus

June 7th, 2023

This is what makes the LSE campus stand out

0 comments | 1 shares

Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

If you’re approaching the campus of LSE from the north side, chances are that you’ll have to go through the busy Kingsway before taking a left on Portugal Street. Particularly important for those who alight at Holborn Station, Kingsway is a constant reminder of the fast-paced life of a city like London. However, if you’re arriving at the School from the south side, you will most likely pass by the vibrant and solemn Aldwych before reaching Houghton Street. Surrounded by old buildings embedded with historical, cultural, and political significance, Aldwych is an ensemble of all the things that make London a great city to live in. You can also get to LSE through the calm and relaxing Lincoln’s Inn Fields which is somewhat secluded from the other busier routes. This alternative access is significantly different from Kingsway and Aldwych, mostly on account of the small park in it that is a great place to go to whenever you feel like you need to unwind.

All of these different paths will sure get you to the LSE campus. However, that’s not the only thing they have in common. Of the utmost importance to anyone interested in finding out what makes LSE’s campus so unique is the fact that the School’s surroundings are very representative of what one can expect to find at LSE itself. For instance, the Centre Building and the Marshall Building – or CBG or MAR, as they are known by students and staff – are always busy with students rushing to lectures or seminars. They are also great places to meet friends and classmates and catch up for a little while before going to your next appointment. Some students also like to do some readings and study on the first and second floors of these buildings, but others find the intense flow of people distracting. Either way, the Centre and Marshal Buildings are a moving picture of how fast and agile life at LSE can be – much like a walk on Kingsway.

On the other hand, some other buildings are great allegories of the history and cultural significance of LSE as an educational institution. The Old Building (or just OLD), with its corridors that look like a maze, is laden with rooms and halls that carry the name of important figures. On a side note, the students’ Fourth Floor Restaurant is a must-go diner for anyone looking for a cheap and tasty meal. On a more political level, the interconnected Pankhurst (PAN), Fawcett (FAW), and Pethick-Lawrence (PEL) Houses, three buildings named after the Suffragettes who fought for women’s political rights, are also a good example of the history embedded in the campus’ walls. The Peacock Theatre (or simply PEA) is a relic of LSE’s commitment to artistic expressions of different sorts through plays, musicals, and concerts. The PEA’s façade on its own is a small-scale reflection of the vibrant atmosphere that one can find when walking along Aldwych.

The Library (LRB) and the Sir Arthur Lewis building (SAL) hide the best places to quietly study or focus on your assignments. Way past the busy entrances or central areas of these buildings, one can find quiet rooms or spots to dive into a complicated text or finish that challenging essay. These hidden places resemble the small park right next to campus, serving as an alternative to the busier routes or places within campus.

And of course, there are many other buildings that comprise the LSE campus, each of which with its own distinct features that will remind you of different things or places. However, what sets the School’s physical presence apart is that it can be somewhat hidden from its external accesses, and yet very similar to them. What this means is that the campus has an atmosphere of its own, even though it is located right in the heart of Central London. And this is why our campus is so unique.

Browse the LSE campus map and watch a tour of the LSE campus.

About the author

Matheus

Matheus Almeida is a master’s student, studying Media and Communications (Data and Society) with a bachelor’s degree in International Relations. Born and raised in the Brazilian state of Bahia. Highly interested in social media infrastructures and data applications. Main hobbies are dancing, partying, and dancing in parties as if nobody is watching.

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