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Lola

June 23rd, 2023

Empowering global change: LSE Festival highlights

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Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

Lola

June 23rd, 2023

Empowering global change: LSE Festival highlights

0 comments

Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

When I discovered the theme for this year’s LSE Festival, which ran from 12 to 17 June 2023, “People and Change,” I felt like I had arrived in London at the perfect moment. As someone who relocated to study behavioural science, I have a keen interest in behaviour change, so I was thrilled to explore the diverse array of events focusing on this niche subject.

However, as I delved into the event listings, I quickly realised that my interpretation of “people and change” was too narrow. The line up included thought-provoking sessions such as “The Changing Nature of Religion in Today’s World,” “The Power of Data in Health,” and “The Birth Lottery of History,” covering a wide range of fascinating topics that catered to diverse interests.

The true extent of the festival’s diversity became apparent when I attended one of the initial events—a panel discussion featuring policymakers, academics, and researchers tackling the question, “Why is Change so Hard?” While this was a challenging question to address, my favourite response came from one of the panellists who acknowledged that although LSE’s motto is “to know the cause of things,” effecting change is far more complex than understanding the reasons behind it. It requires the involvement of individuals from all walks of life to bring about the desired transformation. As I sat among the crowd, surrounded by people from various backgrounds—students like myself, professors, community members, and professionals—it became evident to me that events like this, which gather such a diverse group, serve as an incredible catalyst for the type of change this entire festival aims to promote.

What’s even more remarkable is that attending events at the LSE campus was just one of the many ways to engage with the festival. In addition to daily in-person events, there were hybrid sessions that offered online participation and exclusive online events focused on “Skills for a fast-changing world“. Furthermore, visitors had the option to simply explore the festival by visiting the LSE campus during this time. The exhibition titled “Mapping People and Change” was freely accessible and available for anyone to view, at any time of the day. The exhibition, based at the Marshall Building, showcased maps that shed light on various social science research topics, including inequality, climate, and health. Its purpose was to help individuals better understand the impacts of a rapidly changing world on people and communities. With these remarkably inclusive options—attending events in person, virtually participating from anywhere in the world, or exploring the exhibition at one’s convenience—the festival successfully reached not only the LSE and wider London community but also a global audience.

While it was a pleasure to experience the festival in person this year, I’m equally encouraged by the idea that, regardless of my location, I can participate in the annual festivities. It is one of the many benefits of being associated with LSE—discovering events like this that I may not have known about otherwise.

Catch up with the LSE Festival 2023 on YouTube.

About the author

Lola

My name is Lola Idowu, a master’s student from New York, studying Behavioural Science. Aside from my interest in human behaviour, I also love to read, try out new restaurants, and shop at local markets or boutiques.

Posted In: Student life

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