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Nandini

March 25th, 2024

Choosing Your Accommodation as a Study Abroad Student

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Estimated reading time: 7 minutes

Nandini

March 25th, 2024

Choosing Your Accommodation as a Study Abroad Student

0 comments | 1 shares

Estimated reading time: 7 minutes

As a prospective General Course or GO LSE student, you might be concerned about where to live. As you navigate the challenges of being far away from home, you’ll want to live in a space that makes a foreign country feel like home. While there is no ‘one-size fits all’ answer, several aspects require careful consideration.

 

1. Social life

Building a social network is an integral part of your study abroad experience and often, you’ll find your social circle in your residence. The available student accommodations can broadly be categorised as LSE-only accommodations and intercollegiate accommodations.

LSE-only accommodation: Bankside House, High Holborn, Passfield Hall, Rosebery Hall, Carr-Saunders Hall and Sidney Webb House are exclusive to LSE students. Here, you will interact with LSE students from various academic disciplines and years (it is possible that most of them are first-years and exchange students as second and third years generally tend to live in private apartments). Bankside House and High Holborn Residence are popular choices, with about 27% of General Course opting to live in Bankside House for the 2023-2024 academic year.

Intercollegiate accommodation: Garden Halls, International Hall, Connaught Hall, College Hall, Nutford House and Urbanest Westminster Bridge provide a chance to socialise with both LSE students and students from other University of London institutions. The demographic of each hall varies – Garden Halls and International Hall tend to have a majority of UCL students due to the university’s proximity and Urbanest Westminster Bridge has a large number of graduate students.

 

2. Food

Dining preferences can vary and it’s essential to ensure that your accommodation aligns with your culinary habits.

Catered accommodation: All the intercollegiate accommodation (except Urbanest) along with Bankside House, Passfield Hall, Rosebery Hall and Carr-Saunders Hall have catering services. It is important to note that normally only breakfast and dinner is served; for lunch you must find alternate means. Keep in mind that meals are served at specific time slots and that vegetarian options can be limited. For example, most intercollegiate accommodations have one and a half hour time slots for breakfast and dinner and usually just serve one main vegetarian dish.

Self-catered accommodation: High Holborn, Urbanest Westminster Bridge and certain rooms in Garden Halls provide kitchen facilities for those who prefer cooking their own meals. Depending on your room type, you may be sharing your kitchen with 3 to 11 people. With grocery stores like Tesco Express, Waitrose and Sainsbury Local at every corner, living in a self-catered accommodation can be a convenient option if you prefer cooking.

 

3. Location

It is important to consider the location of your accommodation in terms of its proximity to campus and the general neighbourhood.

Distance: High Holborn stands out as the closest accommodation, just a 10-minute walk from campus. Most of the others are a 20–30-minute walk or public transportation commute, with Sidney Webb House and Nutford House being the furthest away. You should factor in your daily schedule and preferences when deciding your preferred location.

Safety: While most accommodations are in safe areas, consider the atmosphere of the neighbourhood. The Bloomsbury district (Garden Halls, International Hall, Connaught Hall and Passfield Hall) is a popular residential area for students and young professionals, which in my experience, offers a sense of security when walking alone at night. Tourist-heavy areas like Southwark (Bankside House) tend to be vibrant during the day but relatively quieter at night. Regardless of where you live, it is essential to always stay vigilant.

 

4. Other factors

Some additional factors you might want to consider including the following:

Room Types: Different accommodations offer varying room styles, from flat-style to en-suite rooms. Evaluate your comfort level with sharing bathrooms, kitchens and other facilities.

Amenities: Examine the amenities provided in each hall to ensure that they match your needs.

Budget: The price varies across accommodations. Ensure that you choose one that fits your budget without compromising on your needs.

 

Remember, there is no strict rule on where you should live as a Study Abroad student. This blog aims to guide you in weighing up various factors and making an informed decision. Ultimately, regardless of your accommodation choice, you will have a fulfilling and enjoyable study abroad experience at LSE.

About the author

Nandini

Nandini Raisurana is a 2023/24 General Course student at LSE. She grew up in Mumbai, India, and is pursuing a bachelor’s degree in political science and leadership studies at the University of Richmond, VA. At LSE, she is taking international relations, history and law courses. When she’s not studying, she enjoys writing, dancing, travelling, meeting friends, and exploring London. She is super excited to spend time in London this year!

Posted In: Study Abroad

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