South Sudan

  • Permalink Riek Machar Teny-Dhurgon, First Vice-President of the Republic of South Sudan; President Salva Kiir; and James Wani Igga, Second Vice-President of the Republic of South Sudan join hands as the  Transitional Government of National Unity is sworn in on April 2016
Photo Credit: UN Photo via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2anlXoG) CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Gallery

    Peace Agreements Often Fail to Empower the People #SouthSudan

Peace Agreements Often Fail to Empower the People #SouthSudan

As violence flares in South Sudan once again, Naomi Pendle says that the way peace is made or war is fought will either empower or undermine the South Sudanese people.

 

In Juba on the evening of Monday 11 July 2016, as the previous days of gun battles subsided, South Sudanese firemen came to the streets to collect lorry loads of bodies. […]

  • Permalink Photo credit: James Case via Flickr (http://bit.ly/1Z0r2o6) CC BY 2.0Gallery

    Two-way, Not One-way Communication: Why Dialogue Should Be Included in Health Programs

Two-way, Not One-way Communication: Why Dialogue Should Be Included in Health Programs

Emily LeRoux-Rutledge discusses the importance of dialogue as a method of imparting information in a South Sudanese health programme.

On a hot, dry day in a village in the North of South Sudan, ten Dinka-speaking women are sitting under a tree listening to the radio. A local midwife on the radio is trying to debunk the traditional belief in ruaak.

Ruaak dictates […]

April 13th, 2016|Featured, Health|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Parliament in Juba Credit: BBC World Service via Flickr (http://bit.ly/1QWoTs7) CC BY-NC 2.0Gallery

    Book Review – South Sudan: A Slow Liberation by Edward Thomas

Book Review – South Sudan: A Slow Liberation by Edward Thomas

LSE’s Chris Suckling reviews Edward Thomas’ comprehensive, multi-layered examination of the forces that have shaped the South Sudan of today.

The civil conflict pitched between President Salva Kiir’s ruling Sudan Peoples’ Liberation Movement (SPLM), and political and military defectors led by former Vice President Riek Machar, has typically been presented in both cynical and cyclical terms: broken ceasefires are predictable […]

The Ethics of Refugee Repatriation

Mollie Gerver examines how refugees can be assisted in a making an informed choice in returning to a country from which they have fled.

This post is part of our series African Perspectives on Migration looking at the theme of regular migration.

Around the world, refugees are often denied rights under the 1951 Convention for the Protection of Refugees. They cannot access work […]

Overhaul Needed in Stalled South Sudan Peace Process

LSE alumnus Jacob Dut looks as the drivers behind the failure in the South Sudan peace negotiations.

On 15 December 2013, the fledgling nation of South Sudan made a sudden descent into civil war as the President Salva Kiir and his erstwhile deputy Dr Riek Machar found themselves on opposite sides of the political divide. Given the success of the […]

April 1st, 2015|Conflict|1 Comment|
  • Permalink St Andrews, African Inland Church compound, Caigon Boma, Pajok (Photo: Ryan O’Byrne)Gallery

    Lessons from Pajok: Towards a comparative ethnography of security and justice in Africa

Lessons from Pajok: Towards a comparative ethnography of security and justice in Africa

Following an extended period of fieldwork in Pajok, South Sudan, Ryan O’Byrne explores key issues  on the cosmological dimensions of (in)justice and (in)security in the country as raised in his recent JSRP Paper.

There is a growing realisation among donors and policy makers that a stronger evidence base is needed on issues such as how public authority and governance serve […]

March 11th, 2015|Development|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Cattle in Jonglei StateGallery

    Ten years after the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, Why Peace Still Eludes South Sudan

Ten years after the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, Why Peace Still Eludes South Sudan

Edward Thomas takes a fresh look at South Sudan’s fight for liberation.

Twentieth-century Sudan was Africa’s conflicted behemoth: a landmass of one million square miles; societies rich with interconnections and contradictions; and a highly unequal economic and political system that set those societies against each other. The 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement, signed ten years ago, was supposed to end the […]

Film Review: We Were Rebels

LSE’s Cameron Demetre reviews the film We Were Rebels, directed by Katharina von Schroeder and  Florian Schewe, which tells the story of a former child soldier who returns to South Sudan at independence to help rebuild his country.

How could one leave the relative ease of a life in a conflict-free land abroad to return to a homeland rife with violence? […]

January 12th, 2015|Conflict|1 Comment|

Seeking Justice in Nimule, South Sudan

Rachel Ibreck reports on the challenges to obtaining justice in South Sudan.

‘There is no law in South Sudan’, a resident of the town of Nimule, Eastern Equatoria, explained: ‘You see the police cell there is for those who are very poor. You will never see a rich person in that prison for the rest of your life. Trust me, […]

December 18th, 2014|Human Rights|0 Comments|
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    Book Review – The New Kings of Crude: China, India and the Global Struggle for Oil in Sudan and South Sudan

Book Review – The New Kings of Crude: China, India and the Global Struggle for Oil in Sudan and South Sudan

Reviewed by Ed Reed

Sudan provided a proof of concept for Asian NOCs to move from serving domestic demand only, to engaging with all the profits – and problems – that come from international exploration and production, replacing a traditional Western super-major, Chevron. Since production started up in 1999, though, Asian NOCs have evolved, while the Sudanese and South Sudanese […]

October 10th, 2014|Book Reviews, Resources|1 Comment|

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