UK and European law

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    Brexit could mean greater freedom, but also international domination over the UK

Brexit could mean greater freedom, but also international domination over the UK

For some, Brexit was about giving the UK the freedom to make its own decisions without having to respect, be accountable to, or abide by EU law. Matteo Bonotti uses the republican concept of freedom as non-domination in order to explain why Leavers’ understanding of freedom may not be the whole story.

In an article published on this blog shortly […]

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    Permalink Henry VIII, after Hans Holbein the Younger. <a href=Public domain" />Gallery

    The (not so) Great Repeal Bill, part 2: How Henry VIII clauses undermine Parliament

The (not so) Great Repeal Bill, part 2: How Henry VIII clauses undermine Parliament

The Great Repeal Bill proposes to delegate power to Government in the form of a Henry VIII clause which will enable Government to change all EU-derived primary and secondary law by means of a secondary act (usually a statutory instrument) with limited or no Parliamentary scrutiny or oversight. In the second of her two posts on the Bill, Joelle […]

The (not so) Great Repeal Bill, part 1: only uncertainty is certain

The Great Repeal Bill is intended to convert all existing EU law into UK law. The aim is to provide legal certainty after Brexit Day and to enable the government to repeal aspects of EU law afterwards. But, writes Joelle Grogan in the first of a two-part series on the Bill, the proposed Brexit Day division will still create a great […]

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    Brexit is not only an expression of nostalgia for empire, it is also the fruit of empire

Brexit is not only an expression of nostalgia for empire, it is also the fruit of empire

In her novel Beloved, through its examination of America’s violent and brutal history of chattel slavery, Toni Morrison warns against the forgetting of painful pasts. If a society is to ‘come to terms with its own raced history’, painful memories must be ‘“re-membered”… [or] they will haunt the social imagination and disrupt the present’. Catherine Hall, writing almost 20 […]

The Great Repeal Bill explained in sticky notes

The Great Repeal Bill will let the government repeal those EU laws it wants to scrap or change. Joelle Grogan sets out the plan in the form of sticky notes.

This post represents the views of the author and not those of the Brexit blog, nor the LSE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why the European Court of Justice isn’t going away

One of the most contentious issues in Britain’s exit from the EU is the role of the European Court of Justice (ECJ) during and after Brexit. This is because Brexit is ultimately a question of sovereign authority. Who decides the rules of the game when things go awry: a UK judge, or their EU counterpart? Davor Jancic examines the […]

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    Elective dictatorship? The democratic mandate concept has become dangerously over-extended

Elective dictatorship? The democratic mandate concept has become dangerously over-extended

Against the background of a general breakdown of public confidence in the political elite, politicians on both left and right have seen themselves not as part of a broader governing elite but as outsiders, empowered by their democratic mandate to shake up government and make it more responsive to the wishes of the people. Nat le Roux argues that taken to its […]

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    Brexit’s implications for Northern Ireland may be destabilising, but not fatal

Brexit’s implications for Northern Ireland may be destabilising, but not fatal

Brexit created specific uncertainties in Northern Ireland, a post-conflict region where 55.7% of voters (and 85% of Catholics) voted to remain in the EU and where a land border is shared with Ireland. There are fears that Brexit will undermine the 1998 Good Friday Agreement (GFA) and jeopardise the peace process in Northern Ireland. In this post, Etain Tannam, argues that […]

The Article 50 notification explained in sticky notes

Now Article 50 has been invoked, the UK has two years to reach an agreement with the EU. With the help of sticky notes, Joelle Grogan explains what happens next .

 

 

Charities must have a voice in Brexit – for the sake of the disaffected people they help

Brexit is causing consternation among charities and the rest of the voluntary sector. But it is happening – and, argues Stuart Etherington, they must step up and ensure they, and the marginalised people they help, have a say in government policy. Many social care workers are EU citizens and their rights must be guaranteed. Brexit will take away some sources […]