#LSEThinks

By LSE authors

  • Permalink Referendum Party campaigning materials. Image: LSE LibraryGallery

    ‘The most important video you’ll ever watch’: the 1997 roots of British Euroscepticism

‘The most important video you’ll ever watch’: the 1997 roots of British Euroscepticism

Twenty-two years ago, long before the word Brexit was coined, a proto-Euroscepticism was taking root in British politics. Ukip’s first incarnation and the relative success of the Referendum Party both played a part in the 1997 general election. Ros Taylor (LSE) looks at some of the campaign literature from that year.

The 1997 general election is chiefly remembered for Tony […]

Despite ‘Global Britain’, Britain will follow the European trade model for the next few years

The government would like to implement its vision for a ‘Global Britain’ after Brexit. But, says Stephen Woolcock (LSE), for the next few years at least companies are likely to favour the continuity of European trading practices. He looks at the factors shaping that preference.

There are competing visions for British trade policy: ‘Global Britain’, which sees a sovereign Britain […]

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    Will of the people vs democracy: Brexiteers are turning into their own worst enemy

Will of the people vs democracy: Brexiteers are turning into their own worst enemy

The ‘will of the people’ appears to have become a legitimating idea for the Johnson government to supersede representative democracy and the rule of law. Yet in giving the ‘will of the people’ such prominence, the Brexiteers have begun to behave just like their worst enemy, writes Pravar Petkar (LSE).

The Brexit negotiation has seen an array of constitutionally significant moments […]

  • prorogation lords
    Permalink In the House of Lords, 10 September 2019. Photo: <a href=UK Parliament. Copyright House of Lords 2019 / Photography by Roger Harris." />Gallery

    The Supreme Court judges are oiling the democratic machine, not telling it what to produce

The Supreme Court judges are oiling the democratic machine, not telling it what to produce

The Miller2/Cherry case is not about judges seizing the policy agenda, whatever the critics of the outcome might say, writes Conor Gearty (LSE). In this decision the judges are oiling the democratic machine, not telling it what to produce. This Supreme Court decision is a telling illustration of why all populist authoritarians need to dismantle the independent judiciary.

In March 1954, that […]

Rational high ground or compromise? Liberal strategies for coping with Brexit

How do liberal Remainers negotiate their dismay and shock at the Leave vote? Daphne Fietz (LSE) talked to nine people who voted Remain and analysed the comment section of the Guardian. She discusses how they deployed different liberal values in an effort to either distance themselves from the ‘irrationality’ of Leavers, or seek compromise.

While Brexit may be imminent, no […]

The Supreme Court should repair the tear in the fabric of the constitution that prorogation has opened up

The Supreme Court is considering whether Boris Johnson’s prorogation of Parliament is lawful. Thomas Poole (LSE) says the claimants face two hurdles: one concerns the involvement of the Queen, the other whether prorogation is a purely political or a justiciable issue. He argues that the court should recognise that the power to prorogue has legal limits.

On 28 August, the […]

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    The impact of Brexit on UK firms: reduced investments and decreased productivity

The impact of Brexit on UK firms: reduced investments and decreased productivity

The UK’s decision to leave the EU in the June 2016 referendum was a largely unexpected event that has generated a large, broad, and long-lasting increase in uncertainty. It has also affected some firms more than others depending on the strength of their links to Continental Europe. This column exploits these features and uses a major new survey of […]

Does New Zealand provide Brexit lessons for Britain?

What lessons does New Zealand provide for Brexit Britain? Hamish McDougall (LSE) argues that while parallels between New Zealand and Britain in the event of no-deal Brexit are tenuous, New Zealand’s approach to free trade remains a relevant historical case study.

Insights into a no-deal Brexit can be found, of all places, in 1970s New Zealand, according to a recent Bloomberg news article. This […]

Labour cannot be a party of Remain if it is serious about radical change

Brexit has energised the centrist political forces that want to remain in the EU, but they have little to show for their efforts. Michael Wilkinson (LSE) argues that Labour should avoid flirting with Remainism if it wants to be the party of radical change and defeat Boris Johnson.

The divisions underlying Brexit are deep and complex, and cut across various […]

Proponents of the new Bill to stop No Deal face a significant dilemma over Queen’s Consent

MPs opposed to a no-deal Brexit have now published their Bill. Robert Craig (LSE) explains why the existence of Queen’s Consent means that they face a complex legal Catch-22 in their efforts to stop the Prime Minister. This post has been updated after the MPs’ bill was made public.

MPs who wish to prevent No Deal have decided that their […]