James Ker-Lindsay

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    Did the unfounded claim that Turkey was about to join the EU swing the Brexit referendum?

Did the unfounded claim that Turkey was about to join the EU swing the Brexit referendum?

Most observers agree that the chances of Turkey joining the EU are becoming increasingly remote. But even in early 2016, before the country’s failed coup attempt and the 2017 constitutional referendum, Turkish accession was looking a distant prospect. Yet as James Ker-Lindsay writes, this did not prevent Vote Leave from claiming towards the end of the UK’s EU referendum campaign that Turkey was poised to […]

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Look ahead to 2017: A potential Cyprus settlement?

To mark the end of the year, we’ve asked our contributors to preview some of the possible stories of 2017. In this contribution, James Ker-Lindsay writes on the potential for a settlement to be agreed in Cyprus by the summer.

After a turbulent 2016, Cyprus may prove to be an early bright spot in 2017. For the past two years, […]

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Experts react: EU progress reports 2015

On 10 November, a month later than usual, the European Commission released its annual reports on the progress achieved by EU candidate and potential candidate countries. We asked seven experts in the region to give their responses to the key points raised for each state. (If you are interested in how this compares to last year’s reports, the 2014 […]

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  • Permalink A man carries a 6-day-old child at Horgoš near the Hungary-Serbia border. © Elio Germani 2015 / Politico (published with the permission of the author)Gallery

    Five minutes with James Ker-Lindsay: “I have never seen the EU so utterly divided and working against the very principles upon which it was built”

Five minutes with James Ker-Lindsay: “I have never seen the EU so utterly divided and working against the very principles upon which it was built”

How has the refugee crisis affected countries in South Eastern Europe? In a discussion on the situation in Serbia, Croatia and Hungary, James Ker-Lindsay argues that with no country – Germany included – managing to get all of their moves right, the crisis is proving to be the most divisive issue Europe has so far had to face.

Serbia […]

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Experts react: EU progress reports 2014

On 8 October, the European Commission released its annual reports on the progress achieved by EU candidate and potential candidate countries. Experts on the seven countries for which reports were issued give their responses below to the key points raised for each state.

James Ker-Lindsay on Serbia: “It’s time to start building a new state”
Krenar Gashi on Kosovo: “Same alarms, […]

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    Western Balkan states will need allies in an increasingly enlargement sceptic EU if they are to realise their aims of EU accession

Western Balkan states will need allies in an increasingly enlargement sceptic EU if they are to realise their aims of EU accession

The results of the European Parliament elections will have been closely watched in the Western Balkans – and with good reason. James Ker-Lindsay writes that support for enlargement, undermined in recent years by the attention given to the financial crisis, is likely to diminish still further as the anti-immigrant and Eurosceptic feeling that emerged from the period of austerity […]

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    There were few surprises in the European election results in Cyprus, but public discontent was apparent in the large drop in turnout

There were few surprises in the European election results in Cyprus, but public discontent was apparent in the large drop in turnout

The European Parliament elections in Cyprus came a little over a year after the severe financial crisis which hit the country in 2013. James Ker-Lindsay writes that with the allocation of seats among parties remaining the same as it was in the 2009 European elections, public discontent was largely expressed through abstention rather than protest votes. Perhaps the biggest […]

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    Five minutes with James Ker-Lindsay: “Few countries, even ones that are considered to be fully functioning democracies, are willing to accept the loss of territory”

Five minutes with James Ker-Lindsay: “Few countries, even ones that are considered to be fully functioning democracies, are willing to accept the loss of territory”

A number of movements aimed at securing independence for territories within European states have emerged in recent decades. While some of these, such as the Scottish and Catalan independence movements, have received a great deal of attention, others are relatively unknown outside of their own regions. In an interview with Theodora Vasilopoulou, LSE’s James Ker-Lindsay discusses the history of contested […]

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Book Review: Unrecognized States: The Struggle for Sovereignty in the Modern International System

Unrecognized States aims to offer a much-needed and engaging account of the development of unrecognised states in the modern international system: state-like entities that have achieved de facto independence, but have failed to gain widespread international recognition. This book is an extremely interesting study and an invaluable addition to the literature on unrecognised states, writes James Ker-Lindsay. Unrecognized States: The […]

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There is a good case to be made for Cyprus pressing ahead with full recognition of Kosovo’s independence

Cyprus is one of the five EU member states that refuse to recognise the independence of Kosovo from Serbia. James Ker-Lindsay writes that a recent meeting between the Cypriot Foreign Minister and the Prime Minister and Foreign Minister of Kosovo suggests that the country’s stance may be softening over the issue. He notes that although this may seem surprising given […]

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The crisis in Cyprus not only threatens the Cypriot economy, but might also undermine the country’s relations with key partners and allies.

On Monday, the Cypriot government agreed a €10 billion bailout deal with the European Union and the International Monetary Fund, following a week of uncertainty and controversy. James Ker-Lindsay writes that while the situation has damaged Cyprus’s economy, it has also had a significant impact on the country’s relations with its neighbours and partners. Russia and Israel, who had both […]

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Following a litany of failures, few will miss Cyprus’ outgoing president, Dimitris Christofias.

This weekend Cyprus will elect a new president. James Ker-Lindsay writes that history will not be kind to outgoing president, Dimitris Christofias – and rightly so. Over the course of the past five years he has presided over the failure of yet another round of UN peace talks aimed at reuniting the island, oversaw the collapse of the island’s economy, […]

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Barack Obama is re-elected as US President – our experts react

Barack Obama has been re-elected to a second term as President of the United States. We asked EUROPP’s expert contributors for their immediate reactions and their thoughts on the result’s implications for Europe and the wider world. We still matter for US foreign policy – Richard Sennett,  LSE Sociology Obama’s election should be good news for us in Europe – Christopher Pissarides – LSE Economics […]

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EU wins Nobel Peace Prize- reactions from EUROPP experts

Today it was announced that the European Union has been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize “for over six decades contributed to the advancement of peace and reconciliation, democracy and human rights in Europe”. We asked EUROPP’s expert contributors for their immediate reactions.  South East Europe poses a continuing challenge to the Union and its widely lauded model of conflict transformation […]

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Peace efforts in Cyprus must involve civil society if there is to be any chance of success where so many others have failed.

Over the course of five decades, numerous efforts have been undertaken to solve the Cyprus Problem. All have failed. James Ker-Lindsay argues that there is a good case to be made for civil society to play a greater role in the peace process, and that such a bottom-up approach, drawing on a variety of stakeholders, might have more chance of […]

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After a shock victory in Serbia, Tomislav Nikolic now faces a dilemma over Kosovo and EU accession.

Last Sunday’s presidential elections in Serbia saw a surprise win by opposition leader Tomislav Nikolic, of the right-leaning Serbia Progressive Party. James Ker-Lindsay argues that Nikolic will not be able to ignore the issue of Kosovo during his term as the EU is very likely to push Serbia to resolve its differences with Pristina for it to be able to […]

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An independent Scotland would face little European opposition to membership of the European Union.

The question of Scottish independence has been heavily debated in the United Kingdom, with one claim against it being that some European countries might not recognise its independence from the UK and would therefore block Scotland’s membership of the European Union. Citing the examples of Kosovo and South Sudan, James Ker-Lindsay argues that this argument is not based on any real […]

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