Theofanis Exadaktylos

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    Assessing Syriza’s first month in office: why Greece remains a long way from a break with austerity

Assessing Syriza’s first month in office: why Greece remains a long way from a break with austerity

The new Greek government, led by the Coalition of the Radical Left (Syriza), won power on 25 January. Theofanis Exadaktylos assesses the government’s first month in office. He notes that while Syriza won the election with a commitment to renegotiate the country’s bailout agreement, the subsequent negotiations have proven even more challenging than might have been expected, not least […]

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    Syriza is now a mainstream party and there is little for Europe to fear in its electoral success

Syriza is now a mainstream party and there is little for Europe to fear in its electoral success

The Coalition of the Radical Left (Syriza) is currently leading the polls ahead of Greek parliamentary elections on 25 January. Theofanis Exadaktylos writes on the development of the party and what a Syriza victory might mean for the rest of Europe. He argues that Syriza has significantly moderated its position since the last Greek elections in 2012 and that […]

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Book Review: Right-Wing Populism in Europe: Politics and Discourse, edited by Ruth Wodak, Majid KhosraviNik and Brigitte Mral

Right-wing populist movements and related political parties are gaining ground in many EU member states. This book aims to provide an overall picture of the dynamics and development of these parties across Europe and beyond. Combining theory with in-depth case studies, it offers a comparative analysis of the policies and rhetoric of existing and emerging parties including the British BNP, […]

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The primary response by Greek parties to the crisis has been to divert political accountability through populist blame-shifting

Greece has been hit harder by the financial crisis than any other EU member state, with the economic fallout threatening to undermine the country’s democratic system. Based on an analysis of political speeches, Sofia Vasilopoulou, Daphne Halikiopoulou and Theofanis Exadaktylos assess the response to the crisis by the five parliamentary parties in Greece between 2009 and 2011. They find that […]

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Until Angela Merkel forms a governing coalition, Greece will continue to be in limbo

Following last weekend’s German elections, Theofanis Exadaktylos writes on the Greek reaction to Angela Merkel’s victory. He notes that the elections received extensive coverage in the Greek media due to their implications for the country’s economic crisis. Nevertheless, the general perception is that Germany is unlikely to change its course on Europe. The key concern is therefore likely to be […]

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The lack of public trust in political institutions is a massive obstacle to public policy change in Greece.

Since its initial bailout by the EU, IMF and the European Central Bank in 2009, Greece has struggled to implement the agreed measures. Theofanis Exadaktylos and Nikos Zahariadis write that declining levels of public trust across Greek political institutions mean that the government’s efforts at reform will continue to be ineffective. They argue that a long-term change in cultural paradigms […]

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While Greece’s new government has survived the summer’s tests and some of the public’s trust has been restored, further turmoil likely lies ahead.

Since its election in June, the new Greek government has been working hard to restore the trust of the public. In a ‘postcard’ from Greece Theofanis Exadaktylos finds that an apparent relaxation of the Greek public’s mood may be more to do with the languor of a hot summer and headlines that divert attention away from the deficiencies of the […]

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Ouzo and Out! It remains to be seen what Greece is in for after ‘exiting’ the Euro 2012

Theofanis Exadaktylos argues that it remains to be seen whether Greece’s new government will manage to keep up with the rest of Europe’s expectations and show that it is credit-worthy, and that their proposed changes to the memorandum will yield concrete results, or if it will continue its entanglement in Greek politics’ never-ending spiral and succumb to social, economic and political […]

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