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    Book Review: Open Data and the Knowledge Society by Bridgette Wessels, Kush Wadhwa, Rachel L. Finn and Thordis Sveinsdottir

Book Review: Open Data and the Knowledge Society by Bridgette Wessels, Kush Wadhwa, Rachel L. Finn and Thordis Sveinsdottir

In Open Data and the Knowledge Society, authors Bridgette Wessels, Kush Wadhwa, Rachel L. Finn and Thordis Sveinsdottir place the management of open data ecosystems at the heart of the transformation into a “knowledge society”, presenting five case studies through which to consider various ways of dealing with different types of data. Miranda Nell welcomes this book for showing how open data […]

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    SCOSS: strengthening the network of services that underpin open science and ensuring its sustainability

SCOSS: strengthening the network of services that underpin open science and ensuring its sustainability

Many have come to depend heavily upon the large ecosystem of non-commercial services that support open access and open science. However, many of these services are not financially secure; a concern the Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services (SCOSS) was formed to address, calling on the academic and library communities to help with funding. Vanessa Proudman describes how […]

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    Collaboration and concerted action are key to making open data a reality

Collaboration and concerted action are key to making open data a reality

The case for open data is increasingly inarguable. Improved data practice can help to address concerns about reproducibility and research integrity, reducing fraud and improving patient outcomes, for example. Research also shows good data practice can lead to improved productivity and increased citations. However, as Grace Baynes reports, recent survey data shows that while the research community recognises the […]

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The Publishing Trap! A game of scholarly communication

In a complex, evolving scholarly communications environment, it is more important than ever for researchers to have access to information and support resources relating to copyright and intellectual property rights. However, many among the academic community continue to view copyright as something of a problem and difficult to engage with. Experimenting with new ways to communicate and critically examine […]

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    The Radical Open Access Collective: building alliances for a progressive, scholar-led commons

The Radical Open Access Collective: building alliances for a progressive, scholar-led commons

The Radical Open Access Collective launched its new website earlier this week. Open access has always been about more than just improving access to research, and Janneke Adema and Samuel A. Moore here highlight what the Radical OA Collective can offer. A focus on experimentation with new forms of publishing and authorship; the promotion of traditionally underrepresented cultures, languages, […]

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    Journal flipping or a public open access infrastructure? What kind of open access future do we want?

Journal flipping or a public open access infrastructure? What kind of open access future do we want?

Open access debates are increasingly focused on “how” rather than “why”. Tony Ross-Hellauer and Benedikt Fecher present two possible scenarios for an open access future, consider the relative merits and viability of each, and invite your input to the discussion.

Open access (OA) is advocated by science funders, policymakers and researchers alike. It will most likely be the default way […]

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    LSE’s “request a copy” service: widening access to research both within and beyond academia

LSE’s “request a copy” service: widening access to research both within and beyond academia

The 2016 introduction of HEFCE’s open access research policy and specifically its “deposit on acceptance” message has led to a large volume of restricted-access items being placed in institutional repositories. Dimity Flanagan reports on how LSE Library’s “request a copy service” has offered would-be readers a way to overcome this obstacle to research, and how the data the service […]

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    It’s time for “pushmi-pullyu” open access: servicing the distinct needs of readers and authors

It’s time for “pushmi-pullyu” open access: servicing the distinct needs of readers and authors

The open access movement has failed. Self-archiving and open-access journals are struggling to deliver 100% open access and probably never will. Moreover, readers, the curious minds it was hoped research would be opened to, have been marginalised from the debate. Toby Green suggests an unbundling of the often disparate, distinct services required by readers and authors; a new model […]

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    Fair Open Access: returning control of scholarly journals to their communities

Fair Open Access: returning control of scholarly journals to their communities

The problem of how we should transition to open access is now urgent. The current situation is one of exorbitant subscription journals and expensive open-access ones, and to address it requires organised action from academics. The Fair Open Access Alliance, set up to facilitate the conversion of existing subscription journals to open access, is an example of such organisation. […]

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    Book Review: Disrupt This! MOOCs and the Promise of Technology by Karen Head

Book Review: Disrupt This! MOOCs and the Promise of Technology by Karen Head

In Disrupt This! MOOCs and the Promise of Technology, Karen Head draws on a “view from inside” of developing and teaching a first-year writing massive open online course (MOOC) to critically interrogate the claim that such technology will fundamentally “disrupt” educational structures. This is an eloquent and intricate analysis that shows how personal experience and practice can add nuance to questions regarding the […]

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    Taking back control: the new university and academic presses that are re-envisioning scholarly publishing

Taking back control: the new university and academic presses that are re-envisioning scholarly publishing

A recent report from Jisc showcases the upward trend in universities and academics setting up their own presses in an environment increasingly dominated by large commercial publishing houses. Following up on the recommendations arising from this report, authors Janneke Adema and Graham Stone put forward some ideas on how to best support these new initiatives through community and infrastructure-building.

In […]

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    There are new frontiers for academic publishing but scholarly associations and faculty must seize the opportunities

There are new frontiers for academic publishing but scholarly associations and faculty must seize the opportunities

Scholarly publishing faces daunting challenges. Rising journal costs have seen many universities have to make strategic cuts to library collections. To Kyle Siler, the digital world has opened new niches and frontiers for academic publishing, offering many innovative and diverse possibilities. But opportunities must be grasped by scientific professional associations that have arguably lost sight of ideals of accessibility […]

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    Book Review: The Silence of the Archive by David Thomas, Simon Fowler and Valerie Johnson

Book Review: The Silence of the Archive by David Thomas, Simon Fowler and Valerie Johnson

In The Silence of the Archive, David Thomas, Simon Fowler and Valerie Johnson challenge the imagined notion of the archive as a comprehensive repository by exploring their silences, gaps and elisions. While the book could do more to draw out its hopeful implications, this is a timely and valuable call for a new relationship between archivists, archival subjects and archive users, writes Peter Webster.
This review originally […]

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What does the future hold for academic books?

Between August 2014 and September 2016, the Academic Book of the Future Project, initiated by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the British Library, explored the current and future status of the traditional academic monograph. Marilyn Deegan, one of the co-investigators on the project and author of the project report, reflects on its findings, welcoming them as an opportunity to […]

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    Book Review: The Makerspace Librarian’s Sourcebook edited by Ellyssa Kroski

Book Review: The Makerspace Librarian’s Sourcebook edited by Ellyssa Kroski

With The Makerspace Librarian’s Sourcebook, editor Ellyssa Kroski offers a guide for librarians wanting to learn more about the different approaches to, challenges of, and technologies involved in makerspaces. This is an interesting, informative and fun read, writes Antony Groves, that will inspire a wide audience.
This review originally appeared on LSE Review of Books and is published under a CC BY-NC-ND […]

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    Book Review: Copyright and E-learning: A Guide for Practitioners, 2nd ed. by Jane Secker with Chris Morrison

Book Review: Copyright and E-learning: A Guide for Practitioners, 2nd ed. by Jane Secker with Chris Morrison

In Copyright and E-Learning, A Guide for Practitioners, Jane Secker and Chris Morrison provide guidance to educational practitioners working with copyright content. While the book is particularly of use to those in the HE sector, this guide offers a holistic, timely and useful overview of the most pertinent copyright issues affecting education today, writes Emily Stannard.
This review originally appeared on LSE […]

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    OpenAIRE can form the basis for a truly public European Open Access Platform

OpenAIRE can form the basis for a truly public European Open Access Platform

In a previous Impact Blog post, Benedikt Fecher and colleagues envisioned a European Open Access Platform, an innovative public information infrastructure that would integrate publishing and dissemination into the research lifecycle, rather than having it outsourced. Tony Ross-Hellauer describes how OpenAIRE is working to make this vision a reality, and how it can contribute further to create a participatory, […]

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    Book Review: The Data Librarian’s Handbook by Robin Rice and John Southall

Book Review: The Data Librarian’s Handbook by Robin Rice and John Southall

In The Data Librarian’s Handbook, Robin Rice and John Southall examine the role of the data librarian, an emergent profession increasingly vital for academic libraries to support activities around Research Data Management (RDM). This is an accessible and engaging book full of interesting case studies and insights that will be essential for any information professional looking to broaden their knowledge of data […]

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This work by LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported.