Democracy and culture

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    Book Review: Ideology and the Future of Progressive Social Movements by Rafal Soborski

Book Review: Ideology and the Future of Progressive Social Movements by Rafal Soborski

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In Ideology and the Future of Progressive Social Movements, Rafal Soborski provides a punchy and passionate critique of the post-ideology approach of progressive social movements from an anti-neoliberal perspective. While questioning whether all grassroots protest movements have abandoned ideology to the extent described in the book, Luke Martell finds this a distinctive and stimulating contribution recommended to all those interested in social […]

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    Book Review: Feminism and the Politics of Childhood: Friends or Foes? edited by Rachel Rosen and Katherine Twamley

Book Review: Feminism and the Politics of Childhood: Friends or Foes? edited by Rachel Rosen and Katherine Twamley

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In Feminism and the Politics of Childhood: Friends or Foes?, editors Rachel Rosen and Katherine Twamley bring together contributors to explore ways to think about women’s and children’s interests without assuming them to be either antagonists or equivalents. Fabrizia Serafim welcomes the collection for providing a range of alternative theoretical constructs and practical examples of thinking relations with complexity. 

Feminism and the Politics of Childhood: Friends […]

Why the racialization of American politics is here to stay

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Since the election of Barack Obama and continuing with the rise of Donald trump in 2016, American politics has become more and more racialized. While levels of racial resentment have remained largely unchanged since the 1980s, Adam Enders and Jamil Scott find new evidence that it has become increasingly correlated with political issues such as vote choice, partisanship […]

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    Book Review: When the State Meets the Street: Public Service and Moral Agency by Bernardo Zacka

Book Review: When the State Meets the Street: Public Service and Moral Agency by Bernardo Zacka

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In When the State Meets the Street: Public Service and Moral Agency, Bernardo Zacka draws on eight months of fieldwork working as a receptionist in an anti-poverty agency to challenge dominant understandings of the role that bureaucrats and bureaucracy play in the functioning of the state. Alex Sager praises this as a subtle and thoughtful discussion that opens up a […]

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    Book Review: Against Meritocracy: Culture, Power and Myths of Mobility by Jo Littler

Book Review: Against Meritocracy: Culture, Power and Myths of Mobility by Jo Littler

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In Against Meritocracy: Culture, Power and Myths of Mobility, Jo Littler offers a rich analysis that intricately teases out the grasp ‘merit’ and ‘meritocracy’ have on everyday cultural and social narratives of value and power in contemporary society. This is a rewarding contribution to the shared work of challenging hegemonic, neoliberal myths that uphold the status quo, recommends Sarah Burton, and to […]

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    What the Roseanne saga tells us about the left’s view of the white working class

What the Roseanne saga tells us about the left’s view of the white working class

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Last week, ABC cancelled the newly returned sitcom, Roseanne, in the wake of the racist and extremist statements made on Twitter by its titular star. Ben Margulies writes on how Roseanne – the actress – has been made into a populist avatar taken by the media and many on the left to be representative of all of Donald Trump’s […]

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    Book Review: The Cost of Being a Girl: Working Teens and the Origins of the Gender Wage Gap by Yasemin Besen-Cassino

Book Review: The Cost of Being a Girl: Working Teens and the Origins of the Gender Wage Gap by Yasemin Besen-Cassino

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In The Cost of Being a Girl: Working Teens and the Origins of the Gender Wage Gap, Yasemin Besen-Cassino contributes to understandings of pay inequality by showing how the gender wage gap is experienced by the youngest members of society. This nuanced study both reveals and challenges the intersecting elements of workplace culture that enable gendered inequalities to exist, and […]

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    Being the boss is not always good: power taints how we interact with others

Being the boss is not always good: power taints how we interact with others

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Abusive leaders cause suffering not only for their employees, but also for themselves, writes Trevor Foulk.

Lord Acton’s quote that “power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely” probably conforms to most of our experiences with powerful people. People who feel powerful tend to be self-focused, less empathetic, a little more rude or pushy, and just generally difficult to deal with. […]

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    Book Review: How to be a Geek: Essays on the Culture of Software by Matthew Fuller

Book Review: How to be a Geek: Essays on the Culture of Software by Matthew Fuller

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In How to be a Geek: Essays on the Culture of Software, Matthew Fuller explores the bits and bytes that have reshaped our world through a collection of essays that examines the figure of the geek and software cultures. While the lack of cohesive thread and use of terminology means this collection is best suited to scholars already familiar with […]

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    Corporate social responsibility and the dehumanisation of people

Corporate social responsibility and the dehumanisation of people

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A look at CSR in light of the tensions between analytic and empathic reasoning in our brains – by Gareth Craze.

One of the hallmarks of moral and ethical progress in the world of business has been the increasing recognition of just how embedded organisations are in the wider social, cultural and physical environments that they occupy. It might seem […]

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