Democracy and culture

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    Why Trump’s war on the media may have been the best thing to happen to them in years

Why Trump’s war on the media may have been the best thing to happen to them in years

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Since he became president – and during his election campaign – Donald Trump has positioned himself as being in direct opposition to the media, at times calling them the “enemies of the people”. Anne Daguerre argues that in contrast to the relatively placid Obama White House, the Trump administration’s seemingly never-ending supply of scandals and stories has actually been […]

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    Why looking through the lens of religion can help us to understand the popularity of conspiracy theories like Pizzagate

Why looking through the lens of religion can help us to understand the popularity of conspiracy theories like Pizzagate

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Conspiracy theories rarely lead to violence; with the main exception being 2016’s Pizzagate which culminated in a gunman threatening a pizza restaurant which he believed was a front for a satanic paedophile ring. David G. Robertson and Asbjorn Dyrendal unpack some of the reasons why conspiracy theories such as Pizzagate can gain ground so rapidly, citing links to the […]

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    The Brexit mess shows how the UK’s referendum process could learn from California’s ballot initiatives

The Brexit mess shows how the UK’s referendum process could learn from California’s ballot initiatives

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This week sees the UK parliament knee-deep in Brexit related debates, all of which stem from 2016’s non-binding referendum. Erik P. Bucy writes the current rancor in the UK over Brexit is reminiscent of California’s difficult experience with its anti-immigration Proposition 187, which had been strategically pushed by a Republican Governor in 1994. He argues that the UK may […]

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    How President Trump helped the media lose the 2018 midterm elections

How President Trump helped the media lose the 2018 midterm elections

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Historically, leading up to Election Day, media coverage tends to follow the polls: when one party is doing better with voters, the media’s tone tends to be more favorable towards them. But in a new analysis of news coverage of midterm elections since 2002, Stuart Soroka finds that the 2018 midterms were a different story. If the midterms had […]

Book Review: Nihilism and Technology by Nolen Gertz

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In Nihilism and Technology, Nolen Gertz aims to circumvent the binary discussions that characterise contemporary popular discourses surrounding technology, instead exploring the philosophy of nihilism in order to reflect upon the relationship between our values and the ways we use and design technologies. This is a lively and convincing read, finds Jon Greenaway, that will leave readers far better equipped to understand and resist […]

  • Permalink The bridge is jointly owned by the Federal Bridge Corporation and the Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation. It is operated by the Seaway International Bridge Corporation, which came under the control of the Federal Bridge Corporation from the Saint Lawrence Seaway Authority in 1998.

Previously known as the Cornwall-Massena International Bridge, the SIB was a private bridge whose outstanding stock was purchased by the Saint Lawrence Seaway Authority (Canada) and the Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation (U.S.) in 1957. It was incorporated in Canada five years later.

The bridge consists of the South and North Channel Bridges. The South Channel Bridge was opened in 1958, and spans the St. Lawrence Seaway. The North Channel Bridge, opened in 1962, connects the City of Cornwall to Cornwall Island.

In 2000, the international border crossing that the Seaway International Bridge comprises was named the Three Nations Crossing, in honor of the Mohawks of Akwesasne who inhabit the region. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seaway_International_BridgeGallery

    Book Review: Invisible Countries: Journeys to the Edge of Nationhood by Joshua Keating

Book Review: Invisible Countries: Journeys to the Edge of Nationhood by Joshua Keating

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In Invisible Countries: Journeys to the Edge of Nationhood, Joshua Keating presents five present-day cases of border debates, humanising the issues they raise through personal stories and daily experiences. Covering topics from virtual citizenship to nested sovereignty, this book may rejuvenate the conversation about how countries and borders affect residents when they are neither static nor responsive to people, writes Jennifer Stubbs.

Invisible […]

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    Almost 60 percent of Americans believe in conspiracy theories about JFK. Here’s why that might be a problem.

Almost 60 percent of Americans believe in conspiracy theories about JFK. Here’s why that might be a problem.

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November 22nd marks 55 years since the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas, Texas. More than half a century after the event, a majority of Americans believe that more people were involved with the killing than simply Lee Harvey Oswald. Joseph E. Uscinski takes a close look at Kennedy conspiracy theories, arguing that one of the reasons […]

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    Conspiracy thinking is only dangerous when it mixes with extreme partisanship

Conspiracy thinking is only dangerous when it mixes with extreme partisanship

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Conspiracy theories about American politics are nothing new, but recent months have seen an upswing in their impact, after pipe bombs were mailed by a conspiracy theorist to high-profile figures with links to the Democratic Party. Adam M. Enders and Steven M. Smallpage write that conspiracy thinking is not dangerous in and of itself: most Americans have a tendency […]

Book Review: New Female Tribes by Rachel Pashley

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In New Female Tribes: Shattering Female Stereotypes and Redefining Women Today, Rachel Pashley presents the results of a survey of over 8000 women aged 17-70 in nineteen different countries, navigating the reader through a series of snapshots that show how women see themselves around the globe today. While at times engaging in broad brush-stroking in its depiction of four female […]

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    The Brexit vote and Trump’s election were decided democratically. So why don’t they feel that way?

The Brexit vote and Trump’s election were decided democratically. So why don’t they feel that way?

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The Brexit referendum and Trump’s election were each decided by a free and fair vote, yet large proportions of UK and US citizens have trouble accepting them as truly “democratic.” A working democracy requires more than free elections; it requires additional institutions, such as well-functioning political public sphere and a responsive political party system, to channel citizens’ voices into […]

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