Migration

The UK’s new post-Brexit immigration plan is surreal and cynical

The publication of the British government’s white paper for a post-Brexit immigration system is long overdue. But coming so late in the day, with such uncertainty continuing about what Brexit will look like, much of what’s being proposed feels quite surreal, writes Emma Carmel (University of Bath).

The UK’s immigration system is currently a malfunctioning mess. It’s overly complicated, opaque and weighed […]

January 14th, 2019|Featured, Migration|1 Comment|
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    Thermostatic public opinion: why UK anti-immigrant sentiments rise and then fall

Thermostatic public opinion: why UK anti-immigrant sentiments rise and then fall

Contrary to popular narratives, there has been a collapse in anti-immigrant hostility in Britain, evident since the run-up to the 2016 referendum. Patrick English (University of Exeter) explains how the success of the BNP and UKIP may have caused this fall and argues that recent changes may be seen as confirming the ‘thermostatic’ character of British public opinion.

The Britain of […]

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    The parochial altruist: why voters are sceptical about immigration

The parochial altruist: why voters are sceptical about immigration

Why are many – even unprejudiced – people sceptical about immigration? Alexander Kustov (Princeton University) shows this scepticism is largely because they think freer immigration will damage their own country. Despite their ethnic biases and other concerns, most voters can support increased immigration if they see that these policies benefit their compatriots in a clear and straightforward way.
Why do unprejudiced voters oppose immigration, […]

December 18th, 2018|Featured, Migration|6 Comments|

How EU migrants have propped up Britain’s social care

Last week NIESR published new research for the Cavendish Coalition on the implications of Brexit for the health and social care sector.  Their conclusions are stark:  Brexit is likely to lead to a substantial shortfall in nurses and doctors which needs to be urgently addressed by new immigration policy, writes Heather Rolfe (NIESR). However, while the implications of any future immigration […]

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    Curiosity, intelligence and spirit of adventure: challenging misconceptions about low-skilled EU migrants

Curiosity, intelligence and spirit of adventure: challenging misconceptions about low-skilled EU migrants

Curiosity, intelligence and spirit of adventure are the attributes of many low-skilled migrants to the United Kingdom. In this post, Simone Varriale challenges the misconceptions about EU migrants in the current debate. He presents two stories of Italian migrants that explain why dangerous assumptions about low-skilled migration should not feed into policy proposals, and why the government’s current post-Brexit immigration plans […]

October 31st, 2018|Featured, Migration|3 Comments|

Race, class and Brexit: how did we get here?

Although the anti-immigration feeling expressed by the Leave vote was ostensibly directed at other Europeans, racist hate crime also surged immediately after the EU referendum. Brendan McGeever (Birkbeck, University of London) (left) and Satnam Virdee (University of Glasgow) locate the causes of Brexit in neoliberalism, the decline of working-class solidarity, and the emergence of a new politics of racist resentment.

The neoliberal settlement in […]

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    Brexit and migration: Why do rocket scientists pick strawberries?

Brexit and migration: Why do rocket scientists pick strawberries?

Why do rocket scientists pick strawberries, asks Nauro F Campos (Brunel University)? He explains that there are many benefits to migration that are hard to gauge from an economic perspective. Central-Eastern European migrants, for example, who came to the UK in droves in 2004, are known to have significantly higher levels of schooling than that native workers. These migrants take on unskilled jobs […]

October 3rd, 2018|Featured, Migration|2 Comments|

Long read: let’s ditch the stereotypes about Britons who live in the EU

Our images of Britons living in the rest of the EU are dominated by twin stereotypes: the sun-seeking, patriotic pensioner in Spain and the upper-middle-class English couple renovating a Dordogne property. Karen O’Reilly and Michaela Benson (Goldsmiths University of London) make a plea for the true complexity and diversity of the British diaspora to be recognised, and explain how these […]

Other EU countries must reach out to the Britons living there

The UK has belatedly published plans for EU citizens living in the UK to apply for settled status. But most other EU countries have paid little attention to what will happen to the UK citizens living within their borders. Aliyyah Ahad (Migration Policy Institute Europe) says that many are living in limbo, unsure of what their residency, health and […]

September 26th, 2018|Featured, Migration|3 Comments|
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    A Windrush in waiting: post-Brexit categories of citizen in Northern Ireland

A Windrush in waiting: post-Brexit categories of citizen in Northern Ireland

Northern Irish citizens are entitled to apply for an Irish passport, and many of those concerned about the consequences of Brexit have done so. But efforts to accommodate this, alongside changes to the status of EU citizens, will create no less than nine categories of citizen in Northern Ireland. Ben Warwick (University of Birmingham) looks at what this means for the […]

September 11th, 2018|Featured, Migration|2 Comments|