UK and European law

Are referendums a sign of no confidence in the government?

Are referendums a sign of no confidence in the government? In this blog, Joseph Ward (University of Birmingham) compares the 1979 devolution and 2016 EU referendums in Britain. He argues that the 1979 Scottish referendum holds many important insights for understanding the political ramifications of the Brexit vote.

Throughout the protracted debate on Britain’s exit from the European Union, many scholars and commentators […]

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    Long read: There is no such thing as completely frictionless trade across a border

Long read: There is no such thing as completely frictionless trade across a border

The concept of a frictionless border is a constant theme of the Brexit debate. But as Anna Jerzewska (British Chambers of Commerce) points out there is no such thing as completely frictionless trade across a border. Brexit potentially adds new border formalities and checks when moving physical goods across the border, and these extra formalities add to border friction. The […]

February 6th, 2019|Economics of Brexit, Exit negotiations, UK and European law|Comments Off on Long read: There is no such thing as completely frictionless trade across a border|
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    Labour’s path to victory is through Leave-voting Conservative marginals

Labour’s path to victory is through Leave-voting Conservative marginals

Labour must maintain a broad electoral coalition if it wishes to form a government. Its path to Downing Street goes through the Leave-voting Conservative marginals, writes Richard Johnson (Lancaster University). Winning the Conservative-held constituencies in England and Wales that voted for Brexit is a sine qua non for the formation of a Labour government, he argues. 

Based on the results of the 2017 […]

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    Many opportunities to learn from Europe will no longer be available after Brexit

Many opportunities to learn from Europe will no longer be available after Brexit

Opportunities to learn from Europe will no longer be available after Brexit. This is because the UK will be absent from EU policy coordination processes specifically designed to promote learning. In this blog, Kate Mattocks (University of East Anglia) writes about what exactly will no longer be available to the UK, after Brexit.

While Brexit’s putative material impacts have received a great deal of […]

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    Has Parliament taken control of Brexit? Well, it’s complicated

Has Parliament taken control of Brexit? Well, it’s complicated

UK Parliament is an institution that is traditionally considered weak in the foreign policymaking process. Has it now taken control of Brexit? Well, it’s complicated, writes Thomas Eason (University of Nottingham). On balance then, it is currently unclear who really has control of Brexit, he concludes.

Traditionally, Parliament is considered particularly weak when it comes to making foreign policy. Sure, Parliament […]

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    Have British judges already left the EU? The impact of the Brexit vote on EU law in the UK

Have British judges already left the EU? The impact of the Brexit vote on EU law in the UK

In principle, EU law still applies in the UK until the day the country formally leaves. However, as Arthur Dyevre (KU Leuven) writes, the UK’s impending exit may have already altered the application of EU law in British courts. Drawing on new research, he explains that UK courts have submitted substantially fewer questions to the Court of Justice of the […]

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    Confidence motions, humble addresses, and amendments: Brexit’s procedural dilemmas

Confidence motions, humble addresses, and amendments: Brexit’s procedural dilemmas

Brexit has revealed some of the tools that govern the legislative process and how these interact with party politics. Louise Thompson summarises the key procedural dilemmas faced in the Commons so far, and explains why things could get even more complicated.

As we watch the continued unfolding of the Brexit story and wait to see when (and if) MPs will […]

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    Breaking the Brexit deadlock: a binding Protocol to the Withdrawal Agreement might provide the answer

Breaking the Brexit deadlock: a binding Protocol to the Withdrawal Agreement might provide the answer

What if the solution for the Brexit shambles does lie with the EU? In this blog, Stijn Smismans (Cardiff University) proposes the tool of a Protocol to the Withdrawal Agreement, instead of a Political Declaration, as a way to change the dynamics of cross-party compromise on a new deal.

Arguably the UK government has only itself to blame for the political and constitutional Brexit drama. […]

MPs say they won’t allow a no deal Brexit. Can they stop one?

No deal is the default position if the Withdrawal Agreement is rejected by Parliament – but the situation is complex and developing quickly. Omar Salem explains what would be needed for a no deal Brexit to be avoided.

As things currently stand, the UK will leave the EU by operation of law at 11pm on 29 March 2019. If Parliament […]

The time has come to revoke Article 50

It’s time to revoke Article 50, writes Phil Syrpis (University of Bristol). Westminster has yet to see it, but it will not be long before the reality becomes impossible to avoid. Unless something is agreed, the UK will leave the EU on 29 March with no deal.

While attention was focused on the travails of Theresa May – who on 12 […]