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Richard Horton

November 3rd, 2020

Read an exclusive extract from Richard Horton’s The COVID-19 Catastrophe

1 comment | 17 shares

Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

Richard Horton

November 3rd, 2020

Read an exclusive extract from Richard Horton’s The COVID-19 Catastrophe

1 comment | 17 shares

Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

This post is an exclusive extract from Chapter Three of Richard Horton’s, Editor-in-Chief  of leading medical journal The Lancet, recent book The COVID-19 Catastrophe: What’s Gone Wrong and How to Stop It Happening Again. Polity Press.  


This is the seventh post in a six-week series: Rapid or Rushed? exploring rapid response publishing in covid times.

Read the rest of the series here.

As part of the series, there was a virtual roundtable featuring Professor Joshua Gans (Economics in the Age of COVID-19, MIT Press),  in conversation with Richard Horton (The COVID-19 Catastrophe, Polity Press and Editor of The Lancet), Victoria Pittman (Bristol University Press) and Qudsiya Ahmed (Cambridge University Press, India)


Chapter 3

Science: The Paradox of Success and Failure

 

Due to licensing restrictions this extract is no longer available. 

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About the author

Richard Horton

Richard Horton is Editor-in-Chief of The Lancet. He qualified in physiology and medicine with honours from the University of Birmingham in 1986. He joined The Lancet in 1990, moving to New York as North American Editor in 1993. In 2016, he chaired the Expert Group for the High Level Commission on Health Employment and Economic Growth, convened by Presidents Hollande of France and Zuma of South Africa. In 2011, he was elected a Foreign Associate of the US Institute of Medicine and, in 2015, he received the Friendship Award from the Government of China. In 2019 he was awarded the WHO Director-General’s Health Leaders Award for outstanding leadership in global health and the Roux Prize in recognition of innovation in the application of global health evidence. He works to develop the idea of planetary health – the health of human civilizations and the ecosystems on which they depend.

Posted In: COVID 19 | Rapid Response Publishing

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