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Victoria Dyas

December 5th, 2013

A new scholarship programme at LSE featuring some of East Africa’s brightest and best

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Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

Victoria Dyas

December 5th, 2013

A new scholarship programme at LSE featuring some of East Africa’s brightest and best

0 comments

Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

Lalji PfAL Scholarship recipient, Moses Mpungu hopes he and his colleagues can follow in the tradition of other world leaders who studied at LSE.

There has been a strong East African flavour on the LSE campus this term, mostly due to 26 students from Uganda, Kenya and South Sudan studying for Masters degrees in the Department of International Development.

The 26 Lalji PfAL Scholarship recipients pose with Firoz Lalji (centre) and academics from LSE's Department of International Development

This post is re-posted from the ‘Africa at LSE’ blog. Read the full original post here.

 

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Victoria Dyas

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