LSE - Small Logo
LSE - Small Logo

Dipa Patel20

May 13th, 2021

The world of consulting: An interview with ‘The Black Humanitarian’, Susan Sebatindira

0 comments | 2 shares

Estimated reading time: 2 minutes

Dipa Patel20

May 13th, 2021

The world of consulting: An interview with ‘The Black Humanitarian’, Susan Sebatindira

0 comments | 2 shares

Estimated reading time: 2 minutes

In the fourth episode of Can You Hear Us, the team continue with our theme of – Having it All – by exploring a particular area of development that both creates barriers and opportunities for women of colour to professionally engage with and advise on development, aid, and humanitarian interventions: Consulting. Susan Sebantindira, LSE alumnus and founder of The Black Humanitarian, sits down with CYHU team to tackle the world of consulting, and how to find and make space within it.

I do think imposter syndrome is also a structural issue and not just an individual issue. Too often we place on the individual the onus of removing imposter syndrome or finding a solution for it… but you also have to look at the structures in place that lead women of colour feeling disempowered.”

I felt like it was the first time I could see myself in the [development] sector, that there was a place for me.”

Can You Hear Us? is a podcast affiliated to the LSE’s first society dedicated to Women of Colour in Consulting (WoCo), created by the 2020/21 Cohort. Find them on the LSE ID SoundCloud every other Thursday: https://soundcloud.com/lse_id/sets/can-you-hear-us.

The views expressed in this post are those of the author and in no way reflect those of the International Development LSE blog or the London School of Economics and Political Science.

About the author

Dipa Patel20

Posted In: Featured | Fieldwork and Travel | Podcasts | Student Experience | Topical and Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

RSS Justice and Security Research Programme

  • JSRP and the future
    The JSRP drew to a close in 2017 but many of the researchers and partners involved in the programme continue to work on the issues and theories developed during the lifetime of the programme. Tim Allen now directs the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa (FLCA) at LSE where many of the JSRP research team working […]
  • Life after the LRA
    The JSRP reached the end of its grant in spring 2017 but several outputs from the programme are scheduled for publication in the coming months. The most recent of these is a new journal article from Holly Porter and Letha Victor drawing on their extensive research with JSRP in the Acholi region of northern Uganda.  The […]

RSS LSE’s engagement with South Asia

  • Extra-Judicial Killings in India: A Crisis of Justice, Faith and Public Morality?
    This post discusses extrajudicial killings in India, the consequent legal challenges they create, and the increasing normalisation of such encounters through pop culture and public acclamation. Gauri Kumar and Naina Bhargava highlight these arguments using specific examples, and present the existing response of the Supreme Court of India regarding extrajudicial killings.   Extrajudicial killings are […]
  • Celebrating Bangladesh at 50: A Positive Deviance
    LSE alumnus and Member of our Senior Advisory Board Ahmed Mushtaque Raza Chowdhury’s personal account of his journey in independent Bangladesh explains the triumphs of the nation against the odds, the challenges that lie ahead, and his own participation in it.           If someone asked me which year I would like to […]