Economy and Society

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    If we want a better civil society we need to get policy thinkers to focus more on it

If we want a better civil society we need to get policy thinkers to focus more on it

A healthy charity sector is a crucial part of a good society, writes Dan Corry. He draws on the Charity Tax Commission’s latest report to explain why the sector deserves more study by academics, researchers, and policymakers.

Civil society is a very important part of what makes a good society and underpins a strong economy. Yet I am constantly amazed […]

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    Between a rock and a hard place: using tectonics to explore the nature of gentrification

Between a rock and a hard place: using tectonics to explore the nature of gentrification

Patrick Mulrenan and Jane Lewis hope to re-imagine the analogy of ‘social tectonics’ developed by Butler and Robson in their study of gentrification in Brixton in 2001. They argue that, like tectonic plates, communities constantly pull apart, collide into one another and glide past each other, reshaping the urban environment.

Urban spaces are the site of constant physical and social […]

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    Understanding Boris Johnson’s appeal: performative rebelliousness, impishness, and indiscipline

Understanding Boris Johnson’s appeal: performative rebelliousness, impishness, and indiscipline

While Boris Johnson does not meet the definitional elements of populism, he deploys some of its rhetoric and style, explains Ben Margulies.

Many leaders who are described as being ‘populist’ have messy personal lives or outlandish public personae. Donald Trump’s affairs and rhetorical outlandishness are the most prominent example; before his rise, Italy’s Silvio Berlusconi sought a similar public performance. […]

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    No-deal Cabinet: time for another Bank of England stress test

No-deal Cabinet: time for another Bank of England stress test

With the new Cabinet made up of ‘Vote Leave veterans and right-wing free marketers’, Costas Milas discusses how the Bank of England may want to respond.

Evan Esar quipped in his Comic Dictionary that statistics is ‘the only science that enables different experts using the same figures to draw different conclusions’. This definitely applies to the notorious Brexit divorce bill […]

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    Alcohol taxes can improve health outcomes and stimulate the UK economy

Alcohol taxes can improve health outcomes and stimulate the UK economy

Contrary to government thinking, higher taxes on alcohol would not be bad for the economy as a whole: they would bring economic benefits, as well as be an effective public health measure, writes Aveek Bhattacharya. This potential ‘double dividend’ is the reason why the next Chancellor will do well to look again at alcohol duty.

The government has cut alcohol taxes […]

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    Why the Living Wage is an important, but partial, solution to labour market inequality and in-work poverty

Why the Living Wage is an important, but partial, solution to labour market inequality and in-work poverty

Mathew Johnson, Aristea Koukiadaki, and Damian Grimshaw argue that despite the popularity of the living wage, it has not become sufficiently embedded in the UK labour market. This is because employers can choose whether to become accredited or not with the Living Wage Foundation, and there are only weak mechanisms through which to pass on the wage gains to […]

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    Egg freezing: the case for extending the (arbitrary) ten-year storage limit

Egg freezing: the case for extending the (arbitrary) ten-year storage limit

Emily Jackson outlines the rules regulating egg freezing in the UK, and explains why the government should support a new Private Members Bill recently introduced in the Lords proposing to extend the current storage time limit.

It is easy to see the appeal of egg freezing for women who know that they want to have children in the future, […]

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    Never had it so good? Millennials, their living standards, and the UK’s intergenerational audit

Never had it so good? Millennials, their living standards, and the UK’s intergenerational audit

Stephen Clarke draws on the Resolution Foundation’s intergenerational audit to outline key differences in generational living standards. He concludes that in some areas millennials have made little gains on their predecessors, while in others things have even gone backwards for them.

In 1957 the Prime Minister Harold Macmillan told the country that it had ‘never had it so good’. Since […]