Economy and Society

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    The political roots of capital mobility: reassessing Britain’s abolition of exchange controls

The political roots of capital mobility: reassessing Britain’s abolition of exchange controls

Jack Copley explains how the Callaghan and Thatcher governments in the late 1970s were concerned by the worsening performance of British industrial exporters, and so exchange control abolition constituted a strategy to depreciate sterling and boost export competitiveness.

Exchange controls – restrictions on the purchase or sale of currencies – have been thoroughly delegitimised as an instrument of economic management […]

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    Double discrimination: the economic gap between disabled women and the rest of the population

Double discrimination: the economic gap between disabled women and the rest of the population

In the UK, gender policies tend to ignore the needs of disabled women, and disability policies tend to have a gender-blind approach, write Eun Jung Kim, Susan L. Parish, and Tina Skinner. They provide new evidence on the elevated marginalisation experienced by disabled women and call for policies with a more intersectional approach.

In 2018, approximately 14 million individuals, or […]

The Everyday Economy: why it matters and how to rebuild it

Whatever happens after the Brexit process, the UK needs a radical transformation of its economic settlement, write Rachel Reeves, John Tomaney, and Karel Williams. They explain why this transformation should revolve around everyday economics.

Global market forces and national policy have concentrated wealth and political power in the metropolitan cities and major university towns, amongst the asset rich elite and the professional […]

How UK austerity is made: economic storytelling about debt

Johnna Montgomerie argues that austerity is made through economic narratives about debt. She explains how the story the UK has adopted ends up preventing the necessary structural reforms needed to revitalise the economy.

Austerity changed the landscape of the UK, but also Europe, since the 2008 economic crisis. Austerity is the new normal and we are getting used to it. […]

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    Spoofing, truthing, and social proofing: digital influencing after terrorist attacks

Spoofing, truthing, and social proofing: digital influencing after terrorist attacks

Martin Innes, Helen Innes, and Diyana Dobreva explain how digital communications platforms are used in the aftermath of terrorist attacks to amplify or constrain their wider social impacts and consequences.

Terrorist attacks are fundamentally designed to ‘terrorise, polarise and mobilise’ different segments of the public. That this is so was tragically underscored by the recent events in New Zealand, where […]

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    What explains the rising levels of lethal violence in England and Wales?

What explains the rising levels of lethal violence in England and Wales?

Is there a causal association between rising lethal violence and the policy context of austerity, as has recently been suggested? Anthony Ellis explains in what sense austerity may be an important piece of the puzzle of rising violence, alongside the effects of inequality, competitive individualism, and insecurity.

In the wake of the fatal stabbings of Jodie Chesney and Yousef Makki […]

Why the ‘Life in the UK’ test alienates new citizens

The UK’s citizenship process subjects immigrants to requirements intended to enhance their identification with ‘British values’. Does the current process do that, or does it exacerbate immigrants’ marginalisation? David Bartram finds evidence in support of the latter: citizenship policy does more to alienate new citizens than it does to facilitate their political integration.

Have you taken the ‘Life in the […]

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    Business rates: how reform can benefit both business and public services

Business rates: how reform can benefit both business and public services

Organisations across the political, public, and business sectors see business rates as outdated and problematic. Reforming the system could have profound consequences for business vitality and regional development, while also having the potential for securing the proceeds of local wealth creation, explains Kevin Muldoon-Smith.

Business rates – originally a simple property tax based on a periodical Treasury assessment of rateable […]