LSE Comment

  • Permalink Gallery

    The data behind mortality trends: explaining the recent improvement in mortality in England

The data behind mortality trends: explaining the recent improvement in mortality in England

One of the most important functions of a government is to ensure the health of its population, with the main indicator being measures of mortality such as life expectancy. Mike Murphy writes that, contrary to popular belief, current levels of mortality are the lowest ever-recorded by a substantial margin.

Recent reports of adverse mortality trends in Britain have attracted […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Empty Bills: The Queen’s Speech was an odd contribution to solving the UK’s problems

Empty Bills: The Queen’s Speech was an odd contribution to solving the UK’s problems

Artemis Photiadou and Alice Park draw on various strands of research to argue that unless a Conservative manifesto is more radical and relevant than this Queen’s Speech, then a future Johnson government will fail to address fundamental issues, many of which have been caused by other Conservative policies.

Though the likelihood remains the Queen’s Speech will be voted down in […]

An asset to Boris Johnson: ideology in Brexit Britain

Despite all the comings and goings at Westminster, and the debatable qualities of the latest Brexit proposal, the underlying ideological dispositions of a large proportion of the electorate favour Boris Johnson and the Conservatives, write Joe Greenwood and Joe Twyman.

In the aftermath of the success of the Leave campaign in the 2016 referendum on the UK’s membership of the […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Supreme Court judgment: in law, reason still matters, facts are relevant, and nonsense doesn’t work

Supreme Court judgment: in law, reason still matters, facts are relevant, and nonsense doesn’t work

The Supreme Court decision is a telling illustration of why all populist authoritarians need to dismantle the independent judiciary, writes Conor Gearty. He discusses the importance of the case.

Without question, the Supreme Court decision on prorogation is the finest moment in the annals of the UK’s judicial history. Building on the work of their Scottish colleagues, the Court has […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Civic vs. ethnic nationalism in Britain: lessons from the UK Supreme Court

Civic vs. ethnic nationalism in Britain: lessons from the UK Supreme Court

Elliott Green compares some of the remarks made by Aidan O’Neill QC – counsel for the various MPs challenging the Prime Minister’s decision to prorogue Parliament – with those of Boris Johnson, and explains what they highlight about British national identity. 

In Wednesday’s hearing at the UK Supreme Court Aidan O’Neill QC gave a rousing and wide-ranging opening statement that […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    How the Supreme Court could spell out the message that Parliament is not an optional extra

How the Supreme Court could spell out the message that Parliament is not an optional extra

The Supreme Court is considering whether Boris Johnson’s prorogation of Parliament is lawful. Thomas Poole argues that, whatever its final decision, the court should spell out the message that the power to prorogue has legal limits.

In certain respects, the British constitution navigated a path quite effectively from medieval to modern. Walter Bagehot captured the political craft underlying this transition […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    How to fight a class struggle: Immanuel Wallerstein, 1930-2019

How to fight a class struggle: Immanuel Wallerstein, 1930-2019

Lea Ypi outlines Immanuel Wallerstein’s analysis of capitalism as a global phenomenon, and explains how it informs the search for alternatives to overcome it.
Immanuel Wallerstein, the radical intellectual best known for pioneering an account of society known as ‘world systems analysis’, published a commentary aptly titled This is the end, this is the beginning shortly before his death in […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Performative prorogation: what Johnson, Cummings and Co are trying to teach the public

Performative prorogation: what Johnson, Cummings and Co are trying to teach the public

By proroguing Parliament, the government may be trying to teach the public that liberal democracy is a charade and that playing dirty is how politics must go, writes Jonathan White. He explains how prorogation is a performance of ideas about authority and politics. 

What do political leaders hope to achieve by breaking with constitutional rules and conventions? Much of […]