General Election 2015

The last general election was held on 7 May 2015. Here, we’ve compiled all our relevant articles that cover the theme.

The Loser Takes It All – The SNP after the referendum

The independence referendum has given SNP support a level and fervency that makes them a unique force in British politics, writes James Dennison.

If a political party were ever lucky enough to find itself in the SNP’s current position in Scotland, but across the entire United Kingdom, it would be heading towards the biggest landslide in British political history. The […]

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    The glass cliff: Evidence that women and ethnic minorities contest “hopeless” seats

The glass cliff: Evidence that women and ethnic minorities contest “hopeless” seats

Are women and ethnic minorities set up to fail when they run in UK general elections? Clara Kulich from the University of Geneva (Switzerland) presents findings from collaborative research with colleagues at the University of Exeter (UK) and the University of Queensland (Australia) which show that in past UK general elections (2001 to 2010) women and ethnic minority candidates […]

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    Britain’s voting system is partially responsible for holding back women’s representation

Britain’s voting system is partially responsible for holding back women’s representation

The proportion of women elected to parliament in the UK remains low compared to other countries. In this post, Chris Terry examines the gender balance of parliamentary candidates for the upcoming election, and concludes that some progress is being made. Nevertheless, he suggests switching to a system of proportional representation would increase the descriptive representation of women faster than […]

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    There are fewer people registered to vote in 2015 than there were in 2010: is that to Labour’s advantage?

There are fewer people registered to vote in 2015 than there were in 2010: is that to Labour’s advantage?

The 2010 general election result was considerably biased in Labour’s favour: if they and Conservatives had won equal shares of the vote total, Labour could have obtained as many as 54 more seats than their Tory opponents. This bias partly reflected unequal electorates across the country’s constituencies. Recently published data show that the number of registered electors nationally has […]

We need clarity about the 2015 election

The 2015 election is one of the most unpredictable in decades. But this week’s dissolution of parliament was the most predictable event of the year and still large parts of the media got it wrong. This does not bode well for how the post-election period will be reported. In this article and a new report, Akash Paun corrects some of the main misconceptions.

Under […]

Britain’s evolving multi-party system(s)

Throughout the short campaign, this blog will publish a series of posts that focus on each of the electoral regions in the UK. In this post, Jack Blumenau and Simon Hix discuss the overall picture of party competition across these different regions. They show that different regions face different constellations of competitive parties, and that there has been a steady increase in […]

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    Regarding public service spending, the UK electorate faces real choices this election

Regarding public service spending, the UK electorate faces real choices this election

The possible spending plans of Labour and the Tories illustrate the fact that there are real choices to be made at the election, writes John Van Reenen.

When viewed over the longer term, the state of the UK economy is not pretty. National income per person is today about 16 per cent below where it would be on pre-crisis trends (see Figure 1). […]

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    The (not so) basic legislative arithmetic of the 2015 election

The (not so) basic legislative arithmetic of the 2015 election

Most election forecasting models aim to predict two things: the number of votes and the number of seats that each party will receive. However, these analyses are normally driven by the (often implicit) question, “which parties will form the next government?” Forecasters tend to avoid giving direct answers to this question because it is difficult to model the bargaining […]