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Fanny Blanc

Lindiwe Rennert

May 16th, 2021

Progressing Planning – our podcast with Lindiwe Rennert

0 comments | 24 shares

Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

Fanny Blanc

Lindiwe Rennert

May 16th, 2021

Progressing Planning – our podcast with Lindiwe Rennert

0 comments | 24 shares

Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

Our first guest for this series exploring how urban planning is fostering change in contemporary society was Lindiwe Rennert, a transport planner and PhD student in the department or Geography and Environment at the LSE. Lindiwe’s work focusses on the interplay between transit and race-based inequity in urban environments.

In this episode, we talked about the role transport planning carries in shaping our cities, particularly exploring themes of race, property value and access to services. We also discussed the case for reparation and the importance of increasing access to opportunities for Black communities through public transport provision.

I was curious about Lindiwe’s experience as a transport planner in Boston, how she had tackled the topics of public transport provision and race in this dense city. Lindiwe has led on the institutionalizing of race-centric metrics into the project evaluation processes. She is also a strong advocate for the bus, a flexible tool to increase mobility quickly in less connected areas.

Of course, we did not stay far off the topic of the Covid-19 pandemic and its impact on cities, in terms of car traffic and use of public transport. More and more pressure has been added on the roads, impacting the relationship citizens have to traffic enforcement but also threatening the adequate provision of safe public transport options.

 

🎙Listen to the podcast

 

Read more about this 

Darity Jr, W. (2008). Forty Acres and a Mule in the 21st Century. Social Science Quarterly, 89(3), 656-664.

Posner, E. A., & Vermeule, A. (2003). Reparations for slavery and other historical injustices. Colum. L. Rev., 103, 689.

Le Duc, T. (1957). The Work of the Indian Claims Commission under the Act of 1946. Pacific Historical Review, 26(1), 1-16.

Dixon, P. J., Moffett, L., & Rudling, A. (2019). Postconflict Reparations. In Oxford Research Encyclopedia of International Studies.

Coates, T. N. (2015). The case for reparations (pp. 1-50). Columbia University Press.

Hassan, A. & Healy, J. (2019). America Has Tried Reparations Before. Here is How it Went. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/19/us/reparations-slavery.html

Brooks, R. L. (Ed.). (2020). When sorry isn’t enough: The controversy over apologies and reparations for human injustice. New York University Press.

Hylton, K. N. (2004). A Framework for Reparations Claims. BC Third World LJ, 24, 31.

De Greiff, P. (Ed.). (2008). The handbook of reparations. Oxford University Press.

Atkinson, K. (2019). Reparations: Where the 2020 Democratic Candidates Stand. https://www.axios.com/reparations-2020-presidential-candidates-02cce9ac-082e-4777-955b-33c8196e64c0.html

Taylor, K. Y. (2019). Race for profit: How banks and the real estate industry undermined black homeownership. UNC Press Books.

Don’t miss our episode with Dr Romola Sanyal HERE

 

About the author

Fanny Blanc

Fanny is a Policy Officer at LSE London where she carries out policy-oriented analysis and public engagement in the fields of housing and urban planning. She is co-author of several reports targeted at policymakers and practitioners including Residents’ experience of high-density housing in London and A 21st Century Metropolitan Green Belt. Fanny is also in charge of events at LSE London and has developed the ‘London Talks’ with Nancy Holman & Alan Mace since January 2019.

Lindiwe Rennert

Lindiwe is an MPhil/PhD student at LSE in the Regional and Urban Planning Studies program. Her current research is focused on the interplay between public transit and race-based inequity in urban environments. Prior to joining LSE, Lindiwe was a Transit Planner. During her time in the private sector with Nelson\Nygaard Consulting Associates, she worked on long-range municipal development strategies, campus masterplans, fare structure augmentation, system network redesigns, downtown parking plans, and Title VI equity analyses. As a public sector planner with the City of Boston Transportation Department, her work largely focused on combatting racial and spatial inequities in quality of life through rail service enhancements, the implementation of Bus Rapid Transit projects, and the institutionalizing of race-centric metrics into the department’s project evaluation process.

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