Tanzania

Book Review: Julius Nyerere by Paul Bjerk

In a short and precise volume, Paul Bjerk succeeds in debating the legacy of Nyerere in six short chapters. The book deals with the highs and lows of Nyerere’s illustrious political career and balances this in a manner befitting a great African statesman, says Nicodemus Minde.

 

Paul Bjerk has taken keen interest in the study of Tanzania’s postcolonial history and […]

Book Review – Nyerere: The Early Years by Thomas Molony

LSE’s Richard Stupart says this book offers a detailed, entertaining account of the life and ideas of one of Africa’s greatest statesmen.

Bringing together a range of previously-unconsidered sources on the early life and education of independent Tanzania’s first leader, Nyerere: The Early Years adds complexity to a story often told more as a hagiography. A senior lecturer in African […]

Britain and the Scramble for East Africa

LSE’s Jonas Fossli Gjersø examines the reasons behind Britain annexation of modern-day Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda.

 

By the end of the 19th century, Britain had amassed an enormous colonial empire in Africa. In an almost unbroken line, it spanned from Alexandria in the north to Cape Town in the south, and was famously epitomised in the image of the Rhodes […]

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    Sampling, snowballs and non-strategies: How to accidentally stumble upon data ​

Sampling, snowballs and non-strategies: How to accidentally stumble upon data ​

LSE’s Femke Gubbels describes the snowball sampling technique proved useful while doing research in Tanzania.

 
Participant sampling techniques are of relevance to any study involving human subjects. The options are myriad and choosing the right one hinges on what your research is trying to uncover. When conducting research guided by ethnographic principles, it is not uncommon to use snowball sampling; […]

  • Permalink Photo Credit: Bekka Ross RussellGallery

    The Paradox of Caring for Orphans versus Caring for Children

The Paradox of Caring for Orphans versus Caring for Children

LSE alumna Bekka Russell argues that orphanage care for children who have lost their parents should never be the end goal, but rather the fall back when there are no other safe options.

I founded and run an organisation that includes an orphanage, and I hate orphanages. Just one of the many mind-bending situations you find yourself in when working […]

Is Tanzania held together by more than green and gold?

As Tanzanians celebrate their independence 52 years on, Nick Branson reflects on the state of the country’s union.

Fifty-two years ago this week, Presidents Julius Nyerere and Abeid Karume ratified the Articles of Union, establishing the United Republic of Tanganyika and Zanzibar. The two men pledged to draft a constitution for the new nation within one year. Although the new […]

Africa at LSE Blog: Most Popular Posts of 2015

As the year draws to a close, it is normal to think back on how the year went. For those of us who work on the blog, we asked ourselves which articles our readers liked the most. We thought that you probably would like to know too! We hope you enjoy discovering a post you may have missed or […]

Is the Tanzanian National Electoral Commission credible?

As confusion surrounds the 2015 Tanzania elections, Chambi Chachage examines the role played by the National Electoral Commission so far.

“There is a grey area between incompetency and conspiracy” – Election Observer

If a palm wine tapper is praised, he/she dilutes it with water. This Swahili proverb captures what has been happening in the aftermath of Tanzania’s General Elections that seemed to be […]

  • Permalink Jakaya Kikwete will step down as President of Tanzania in October 2015 Photo: WEF via Flickr (http://bit.ly/1KpjIy4) (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)Gallery

    Opposition Politics in Tanzania and Why the Country will Benefit from a Strong Unified Opposition

Opposition Politics in Tanzania and Why the Country will Benefit from a Strong Unified Opposition

As opposition parties in Tanzania unite, Nicodemus Minde looks at how this new coalition could become a credible option for the country’s citizens.

In a region bedevilled by incessant political crises, Tanzania has always stood as a beacon of hope in the larger East African region. Tanzania’s neighbours Burundi, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo have all been in […]

  • Permalink President Julius Nyerere on the Arusha Declaration March in 1967. Image via juliusnyerere.net Gallery

    What’s at stake in Tanzania’s constitutional referendum? Part III: Familiar principles, new rights and responsibilities

What’s at stake in Tanzania’s constitutional referendum? Part III: Familiar principles, new rights and responsibilities

This is the final piece in a series by Nick Branson on Tanzania’s proposed constitution, or ­katiba. Here we consider how historical attachments to African socialism have been balanced with efforts to enshrine new norms and values in the basic law. Read about the preservation of the two-tier government in part one, and changes to the presidency and parliament in part […]

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