By LSE authors

Which British regions will suffer most – and least – from Brexit?

Britain’s richer cities, particularly those in the south of England, will be hit hardest by Brexit, according to a study by the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance (working with the Centre for Cities think tank). Henry G Overman writes that the local economic impact will be particularly apparent in areas with strong specialist service industries.

Our research (with Swati Dhingra and Stephen Machin) looks at […]

A Brexit summer reading guide

Have you been struggling to keep up with all the new books on Brexit? Were you secretly planning to spend your summer holiday catching up on some of them? OK – perhaps not. But if you were,  Tim Oliver is here to help with a guide on what to take away with you to the beach or pool to focus on […]

Why May can’t have it all: the ECJ and the Brexit rules of (dis-)engagement

Theresa May was adamant that the UK would not accept the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice after Brexit. But as reality has sunk in, that red line has begun to blur. LSE Fellow Anna Tsiftsoglou explains why the ECJ is such a vital issue in the exit negotiations. To reverse David Davis’ footballing metaphor, if the UK plays in […]

When unpaid childcare isn’t ‘work’: EU residency rights have gendered consequences

All EU migrants are not equal when it comes to residency rights, writes Isabel Shutes, Assistant Professor of Social Policy at the LSE. The unpaid labour of women with young children, who take time out of paid work to look after them, is not recognised as “genuine and effective work” in EU case law. Consequently, they are at greater risk of […]

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    Desire for change and rejection of a ‘hard Brexit’ motivated young people in the General Election

Desire for change and rejection of a ‘hard Brexit’ motivated young people in the General Election

A new survey of voters in the recent UK general election has revealed that young voters – those between the ages of 18 and 24 years old – were significantly more motivated by a desire for change, a rejection of the vision of Brexit that the Government was promoting, and frustration with the current political climate than the rest […]

Euroscepticism has taken hold across the EU – but it has many different roots

Euroscepticism – defined as outright or defined opposition to the European project – is becoming a mainstream, contested phenomenon, writes Simona Guerra. The EU has been challenged by the Greek referendum in July 2015, the refugee crisis and Brexit. Euroscepticism is no longer the exclusive province of ‘peripheral’ parties like Ukip or the fringes of society. How did a previously sidelined […]

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    Post-Brexit work visa quotas on EU nationals are likely to favour graduates

Post-Brexit work visa quotas on EU nationals are likely to favour graduates

Businesses that rely on low-skilled EU labour may face hiring difficulties, writes Jonathan Wadsworth. He argues that post-Brexit work visa quotas on EU nationals will probably favour graduates.

Had things gone as most commentators expected, the UK would now be entering hard Brexit talks with the near certainty of leaving the single market and/or customs union and the consequent ending of […]

Divorce doesn’t have to be bloody difficult

Framing Brexit as overwhelmingly negative prevents productive dialogue. Jennifer Jackson-Preece who has recently introduced the Generation Brexit project on the blog, which gives voice to the millennial generation, addresses ways of developing a less confrontational Brexit identity.

In a recent blog, Steve Bullock rightly reminds us that tough and difficult are not the same thing. As a former EU trade negotiator, he speaks from experience. But […]

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    A U-turn on a hard Brexit should not be entirely disregarded

A U-turn on a hard Brexit should not be entirely disregarded

Britain’s recent General Election and its unanticipated outcome marks the latest chapter in the political turbulence that has characterised the last twelve months since the EU referendum. Tim Oliver argues that the election was not in fact about Brexit, although it does now leave the timing of Brexit in flux. 

 

Much ink has been spilt explaining one of the most unexpected […]

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    Brexit is a fascinating case study for the next generation of students and teachers of British and European politics

Brexit is a fascinating case study for the next generation of students and teachers of British and European politics

Brexit is both a boon and a bane to the teaching and study of British and European politics. For Dr Tim Oliver of LSE and Alex Boyle, a politics student at the University of Liverpool, there are five ways in which Brexit is central to the study and teaching of both.

As a student learning the politics of Europe […]