By LSE authors

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    Understanding the Brexit vote: the interplay between economic internationalisation and cultural openness

Understanding the Brexit vote: the interplay between economic internationalisation and cultural openness

The Leave vote prevailed in regions where local workers do not interact much with foreign cultures – yet some of these places rely on jobs created by foreign firms. If internationalisation in the workplace does not match internationalisation ‘at home’, pressure on local workers to opt out from further economic integration increases, write Riccardo Crescenzi (LSE) (left), Marco Di Cataldo (LSE), and Alessandra […]

How the European Council can break the impasse and give EU citizens certainty

The way that EU27 citizens in the UK have been used as bargaining chips in the Brexit negotiations is woeful. Unfortunately, write Ruvi Ziegler (University of Reading) (left) and Brad Blitz (Middlesex University and LSE), the EU has not helped matters by conceding that the rights of UK citizens living in the rest of the EU were negotiable, too. […]

Expect a backlash if the £50bn offer doesn’t move negotiations on

After threatening to pay nothing to the EU, then conceding £20bn, the government has finally indicated it will pay a Brexit ‘divorce bill’ of £40-50bn. The initial reaction from Eurosceptics has been rather muted, writes Iain Begg (LSE). But if the European Council does not allow exit negotiations to move to the next stage, we can expect a serious backlash […]

Post-Brexit UK trade policy remains a wish list

About half of UK’s trade and investment is with the EU and, as a member of the single market, the UK implements similar standards for products and services as the EU. Furthermore, as a member of the customs union, the UK operates a common external tariff, and goods and services can move seamlessly with no customs or compliance checks. How […]

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    The productivity gap adds to the concerns about how Brexit can be navigated

The productivity gap adds to the concerns about how Brexit can be navigated

In this blog, Iain Begg (LSE) explains why the low expectations of the trend of productivity growth in the UK, published by the Office for Budget Responsibility, add to the concerns about how Brexit can be navigated.

Chancellors usually try to achieve three things in their annual budget speeches: setting a course for the economy; pulling rabbits from their hats […]

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    Germany’s Brexit moment: What happens now following the collapse of coalition talks?

Germany’s Brexit moment: What happens now following the collapse of coalition talks?

Coalition talks in Germany between the CDU/CSU, the FDP and the Greens have collapsed, with the FDP withdrawing from the discussions after four weeks of negotiations. Julian Göpffarth assesses why the FDP chose to quit the process and what is likely to happen now.

This morning, Berlin woke up in shock. Most observers anticipated that the so-called Jamaica coalition negotiations […]

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    A happy Brexit? We should rather brace ourselves for a dramatic change in our democratic freedom – for the worse

A happy Brexit? We should rather brace ourselves for a dramatic change in our democratic freedom – for the worse

As the Conservative MP and prospective scholar Chris Heaton-Harris reminds us, it is important when reflecting on Brexit within the academy to identify the potentially positive as well as the negative aspects of leaving the EU. Conor Gearty (LSE) scrutinises this notion of a happy Brexit, and outlines multiple areas in which the EU Withdrawal Bill will constitute a large transfer of power to the […]

LSE Continental Breakfast 5: Britain’s financial obligations to the EU

How much does Britain owe the EU? What are its legal obligations? Is the European Commission right to demand that the vexed issue of Britain’s ‘divorce bill’ is settled before trade talks can begin? Britain’s financial obligations to the EU were the subject of the fifth Continental Breakfast discussion at the LSE – held under Chatham House rules, so […]

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    UK households are already paying an average of £404pa for Brexit

UK households are already paying an average of £404pa for Brexit

On 23 June 2016, the UK voted to leave the EU. As soon as the result became clear, sterling depreciated sharply and, since the vote, UK inflation has dramatically increased. How much of the rise in inflation is due to the referendum? Holger Breinlich, Elsa Leromain, Dennis Novy, and Thomas Sampson, (LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance) find that the referendum result pushed up UK […]

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    What makes Britain ‘Great’? The end of the postwar consensus of liberal internationalism

What makes Britain ‘Great’? The end of the postwar consensus of liberal internationalism

The Leave and Remain campaigns defined British ‘greatness’ in very different ways. The referendum reflects more than attitudes toward EU membership — it  marks a new understanding of Britain’s role in the world, argues Benjamin Martill (LSE). The end of the postwar consensus of liberal internationalism has important implications and needs to be taken seriously.

The ‘Great’ in Great Britain is a geographical […]