EU institutions

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    European views on the UK’s renegotiation: Germany, Greece, Slovakia and the EU’s institutions

European views on the UK’s renegotiation: Germany, Greece, Slovakia and the EU’s institutions

The success or failure of David Cameron’s planned renegotiation of the UK’s EU membership will depend to a large extent on how the other 27 EU member states respond to his proposals. But how do countries across the EU view the UK’s renegotiation? Building on a report published in 2014 by the German Council on Foreign Relations, EUROPP is […]

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National politicians should keep an open mind over proposals to create a European Public Prosecutor’s Office

National parliaments in several European countries have voiced opposition against proposals to create a European Public Prosecutor’s Office (EPPO). Hugo Brady provides an overview of what an EPPO would entail, and assesses the extent to which it would help tackle the misuse of EU funds. He argues that those who are sceptical about the proposals should keep an open mind […]

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It’s time for European governments to embrace a real reform agenda for the EU

David Cameron has announced his intention to renegotiate Britain’s membership of the European Union ahead of an ‘in/out’ referendum in 2017. Hugo Brady writes that rather than attempting to negotiate the re-nationalisation of EU powers to Westminster, he and other European leaders should consider some practical, feasible reforms that the Union can begin to implement immediately. Outlining a series of […]

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Falling support for the European Parliament, not the economic crisis, has led to a decline in support for the EU in Spain and Portugal.

In April, a major Eurobarometer study reported that there had been a decline in support for the European Union across Europe, especially in countries where the Eurozone crisis’ effects had been most severe. Mariano Torcal takes a closer look at the reasons behind falling support for the EU in Spain and Portugal. Using panel data, he finds that a significant […]

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‘Crisis, What Crisis?’ On the Virtues of Muddling Through in European Politics

There can be little doubt that the EU faces a political crisis. But is this really an existential crisis for the European project, as many claim? Writing in a personal capacity, Henry Radice argues that muddling through a serious crisis, however unsatisfactory it might feel at the time, can be a sign of institutional resilience and strength, not weakness. As Europe muddles […]

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The European Commission is a unique ‘laboratory’ for supranational institution building.

As Morten Egeberg writes, international organisations are typically composed of representatives with affiliations to the national level. The European Commission, in contrast, is one of the few international institutions in which key actors owe their allegiances to the supranational level. Assessing the potential for the Commission to act as a ‘laboratory’ for experiments in supranational institution building, he finds that […]

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Far from dominating EU decision-making, France and Germany are among the least successful EU states at negotiating legislation and budget contributions

A common assumption is that the largest EU countries get their way most often in negotiations within the EU’s institutions. Contrary to this perspective, Jonathan Golub finds that smaller states like Finland tend to be far more successful at negotiating EU legislation than countries like France and Germany. He also finds little evidence for the idea that Member States might […]

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Book Review: Euroscepticism within the EU Institutions: diverging views of Europe

Since its origins, there have been competing views concerning the nature, scope and objectives of the process of integration and of the European Union. Attitudes towards Europe and European integration, both among political elites and citizens, have been much studied over the last 15 years. But there is no comprehensive analysis of these competing views of Europe at the supranational […]

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Recent measures may have signalled the beginning of the end of the Eurozone crisis. But the transformation of EU economic governance is still far from complete.

Measures such as the new Fiscal Compact and the European Stability Mechanism may have averted the immediate threat to the Euro. But, according to Iain Begg, some further measures, such as the introduction of Eurobonds, are needed on top of what has been, up until now, the largely piecemeal evolution of European economic governance. Slowly, painfully and often reluctantly, the […]

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The EU must re-create trust between member states if the benefits of integration are not to ebb away – and persuade its citizens that credible state institutions can be rebuilt in Greece

The Euro crisis is more than the breakdown of a currency – it is also causing a breakdown of trust between the EU’s members.Heather Grabbe argues that the competing narratives about who is to blame for the crisis have led to loss of trust that goes beyond the Euro. If the Germans cannot trust Greece to keep its financial house […]

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The European Court of Justice is now little more than a rubber stamp for the EU. It should be replaced with better alternative arrangements for central judicial guidance.

Last Friday saw the ECJ taking on new roles as ‘enforcer’ of the new fiscal compact to limit budget deficits and debt across 25 EU member states. Damian Chalmers argues that the Court has grown too institutionally close to the EU to now be judicially effective. In order to check EU Institutions the ECJ could be replaced by a new […]

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The European Court of Justice has taken on huge new powers as ‘enforcer’ of the Treaty on Stability, Coordination and Governance. Yet its record as a judicial institution has been little scrutinised.

In the ongoing effort to solve the Eurozone crisis, 25 EU member states have signed a fiscal compact to limit budget deficits and debt. The European Court of Justice has taken on a new role to enforce these provisions by enacting severe penalties on non-compliant countries. Damian Chalmers argues that the Court’s record has been very little scrutinised. He argues […]

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