financial crisis

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    Data on political attention in the Council illustrates the EU’s failure to proactively address major crises

Data on political attention in the Council illustrates the EU’s failure to proactively address major crises

When government ministers meet in the Council of the European Union, what determines the level of attention they direct toward particular policy areas and issues? Based on recent research, Frank Häge illustrates how the Council has focused on different policy areas over time. He writes that one of the most striking trends to emerge from the data is the […]

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    Beyond the nation state: How European cities and regions responded to the financial crisis

Beyond the nation state: How European cities and regions responded to the financial crisis

The financial crisis affected European countries in radically different ways, with some countries emerging relatively unscathed, while others suffered extreme economic problems that still persist today. But as Riccardo Crescenzi, Davide Luca and Simona Milio outline, the effects were also substantially different between individual cities and regions. Based on recent research, they demonstrate which regions were best placed to […]

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    Pension reforms since the financial crisis could have a serious impact on the future retirement incomes of young Europeans

Pension reforms since the financial crisis could have a serious impact on the future retirement incomes of young Europeans

What effect has the financial crisis had on pension systems in EU countries? Aaron G. Grech notes that prior to the crisis there was a significant divergence in pensions across the EU, with some states having relatively generous systems in comparison to others. He writes that following the crisis, southern European states have had to substantially cut back on […]

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    Five minutes with Phillip Blond: “We’re looking at a complete collapse of standard left and right ideologies”

Five minutes with Phillip Blond: “We’re looking at a complete collapse of standard left and right ideologies”

Traditional political and economic models have been challenged by their inability to predict the financial crisis and their failure to bring about a return to prosperity. In an interview with EUROPP’s Managing Editor Stuart Brown, Phillip Blond discusses the collapse of left-wing and right-wing ideologies, the new majorities that may take their place, and why despite the EU’s failings, […]

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    Spain’s labour market and social reforms have exacerbated the country’s unemployment problem

Spain’s labour market and social reforms have exacerbated the country’s unemployment problem

Spain was one of the countries hardest hit by the Eurozone crisis. Vincent Navarro writes on labour market and social reforms which have taken place within the country as part of the response to the crisis. He argues that policies aimed at deregulating the labour market have done little to solve Spain’s unemployment problem and have been more geared […]

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    The proposed EU Financial Transactions Tax is both illogical and likely to be economically damaging

The proposed EU Financial Transactions Tax is both illogical and likely to be economically damaging

In 2011, the European Commission proposed a Financial Transactions Tax (FTT) to raise revenue from the financial sectors in EU countries following the financial crisis. To date, however, only 11 EU states have so far agreed to implement such a tax. John Grahl and Photis Lysandrou write that while they broadly agree with the objectives behind the FTT, the […]

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    Economics has had a significant rethink since the financial crisis, but political science sails blithely onwards

Economics has had a significant rethink since the financial crisis, but political science sails blithely onwards

The financial crisis which began in 2007 prompted a number of changes in academic approaches to economics. As Mick Moran writes, however, political science has not experienced the same level of introspection, despite the crisis also offering challenges to the discipline. He argues that the reasons for this lie in the historical mission of political science and in its […]

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April 5th, 2014|Mick Moran|4 Comments|

Iceland’s centre-left parties must offer a genuine alternative to the ruling centre-right coalition if they are to regain their credibility with the electorate

Iceland’s centre-left parties suffered a loss of support in elections earlier this year, with the centre-right Progressive Party and the Independence Party entering government. Matthew Deaves outlines the main factors behind the result, and assesses what the future holds for Iceland’s left. He argues that the left largely failed to live up to its reputation in government, and must offer […]

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The financial crisis means that Europe will need to look beyond the public sector to provide its healthcare needs

The financial crisis has led to public spending cuts across most European countries. Richard B Saltman and Zachary Cahn write that even if current levels of health spending are maintained, public healthcare systems will increasingly come under strain due to projected rises in healthcare costs. They argue that the only solution left for European governments is to increase the contribution […]

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Divided Nations: Why global governance is failing, and what we can do about it

Globalisation has made the world a far more interconnected place than ever before. Ian Goldin writes that while this increased connectivity provides unprecedented opportunities for collaboration and innovation, it also risks facilitating the spread of global crises. Meeting these globalised challenges will require a radical rethinking of global governance structures, with five core principles being at the heart of any […]

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voxEUROPP Episode 3: What does it mean to be European?

Today EUROPP launches the third episode in our voxEUROPP series of podcasts. Presented by Chris Gilson, voxEUROPP draws on academic experts from EUROPP to discuss the latest issues across European governance, economics, politics, culture and society, both at the European Union and national levels.

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In this voxEUROPP episode we hear from renowned philosophers and historians about what it means to be ‘European […]

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Book Review: In the Wake of the Financial Crisis: Leading Economists Reassess Economic Policy

In 2011, the International Monetary Fund invited prominent economists and economic policy makers to consider the brave new world of the post-crisis global economy. The result is a book that captures the state of macroeconomic thinking at a transformational moment. Among the new realities they consider are the swing towards regulation, the need to incorporate behavioural economics, and the importance for macroeconomic […]

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Book Review: European Identity and Culture: Narratives of Transnational Belonging

European Identity and Culture explores cultural aspects of transnational identity formation. At its core, it tries to shed light on why there is both resistance and a search for common belonging in Europe. Amy Ludlow finds that in reframing our conceptual understanding of identity and its formation, this book sheds light upon how we might respond to the longstanding crisis […]

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October 14th, 2012|Book Reviews|0 Comments|

Fiscal contractions to reduce deficits can only slow down the recovery: Richard Layard explains the Manifesto for Economic Sense

Richard Layard discusses his ‘Manifesto for Economic Sense’, co-authored with Paul Krugman, which argues that fiscal deficits are due to stagnation, and that further austerity to reduce deficits will only slow down the recovery. Thousands of economists disagree with the austerity policies being followed in so many countries. Yet few speak out and I am one of the guilty ones. That is […]

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Book Review: What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets

In What Money Can’t Buy, Sandel examines one of the biggest ethical questions of our time and provokes a debate that’s been missing in our market-driven age: What is the proper role of markets in a democratic society, and how can we protect the moral and civic goods that markets do not honour and money cannot buy? Gil Shidlo feels that Sandel brings the […]

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Book Review: Irish Governance in Crisis

Ireland’s rapid shift from economic success story to recession casualty left many to rethink the country’s relationship to Europe. However, Irish Governance in Crisis argues that the downturn in the economy exposed failures in governance within the country itself which remain resistant to change. The book’s focus on these systemic problems, finds Mary Murphy, offers an important, but depressing lesson for those interested in meaningful and effective reform. […]

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June 10th, 2012|Book Reviews|3 Comments|

Book Review: Governing Ireland: From Cabinet Government to Delegated Governance by Eoin O’Malley and Muiris MacCarthaigh

The structures of Irish government were once considered reliably stable and efficient, but the economic crash of 2008 swept away all such sureties. How did those in government fail to foresee the challenges and avert a crisis that has undermined the state in many respects? Liz Carolan finds that Governing Ireland maintains a considered, confident and probing air, collecting together the personal and surprisingly outspoken analysis of […]

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Socio-economic volatility and the rise of anti-establishment politics will characterise Greece’s most important election in nearly 40 years. The likely outcome is a coalition government, but will it be able to undertake the substantive reforms Greece badly needs?

Greece is one of several countries in Europe facing elections in May. But, if polling is to be believed,  there are few countries in Europe that are experiencing as drastic an electoral shift as has been occurring in Greece since the onset of the crisis. Daphne Halikiopoulou and Sofia Vasilopoulou argue that the social and economic uncertainty brought on by […]

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Book Review: Understanding The Crisis in Greece: From Boom to Bust, by Michael Mitsopoulos & Theodore Pelagidis

The new book from Michael Mitsopoulos & Theodore Pelagidis provides a good and honest account of the Greek economic crisis, focusing on issues that are both sensitive and critical: nepotism and corruption. At a time when elections are fast approaching, Daphne Halikiopoulou finds this book to be extremely relevant and topical. Understanding The Crisis in Greece: From Boom to Bust. Michael Mitsopoulos & Theodore Pelagidis. […]

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Book Review: Spain’s ‘Second Transition’: The Socialist Government of Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero, edited by Bonnie N. Field

Considering the developments and reforms that occurred under Spanish Prime Minister José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero between 2004 and 2008, Bonnie N. Field and contributors analyze the patterns of continuity and change and provide a critical evaluation of the concept of a ‘second transition’. Sebastian Balfour finds the title problematic, but praises the book for restoring balance to the almost uniformly negative judgements in the […]

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