Research

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    Is culture more important than economics in shaping ideology?

Is culture more important than economics in shaping ideology?

Joe Greenwood discusses the analysis of new survey data revealing that contemporary ideological groups are related not only to political factors such as party identity but also to demographic and cultural characteristics. In particular, Moderates and Left-Wing Progressives appear to be demographically distinct from both Mainstream and Right-Wing Populists, but culturally distinct from Centrists and Mainstream Populists. Further, to […]

October 17th, 2018|Featured, Research, Staff|0 Comments|

Legacies of Mass Atrocity and the Rejection of Human Rights

Ivor Sokolić discusses his new book publication ‘International Courts and Mass Atrocity: Narratives of War and Justice in Croatia’ and explores why universal human rights norms struggle to take hold in post-conflict societies.   

Efforts by international organisations to instil universal human rights norms in post-conflict societies often fail because such efforts ignore the localised complexities they operate in. They […]

The Institutions for Democratic Politics

Frank Vibert draws from his new book to outline how our current democratic institutions are increasingly in need of reform in order to address the blind spots and content-lite nature of our current democratic politics.

Those of us who follow politics on a daily basis suffer from information overload, trivia fatigue and ‘sorting failure’ as we try to distinguish between […]

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    “A wonderful introduction to the world of academic research” – Undergraduate research takes centre stage

“A wonderful introduction to the world of academic research” – Undergraduate research takes centre stage

Eponine Howarth reflects on a successful year for the LSE Undergraduate Political Review, which led to them sharing their undergraduate research at the ‘Political Science Association Undergraduate Conference’ and the ‘British Conference for Undergraduate Research’.

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    Will the ‘youthquake’ shake up the 2018 local elections?

Will the ‘youthquake’ shake up the 2018 local elections?

Youth engagement was heralded by some as a key factor in the 2017 UK general election result but what impact could it have in the 2018 local elections? Erica Belcher argues that this enthusiasm may not necessarily translate to the local level, but it’s more important than ever for young people to engage in local politics.

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    Mohammed bin Salman and Saudi Arabia: from political paralysis to rapid action

Mohammed bin Salman and Saudi Arabia: from political paralysis to rapid action

Steffen Hertog reflects on Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman much needed economic overhaul in Saudi Arabia and why the Crown Prince’s plans don’t add up.

Saudi Arabia has moved from political paralysis to rapid action under the de facto leadership of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. He has introduced a raft of ambitious economic reform plans, including the kingdom’s first […]

Reconciliation as Activity: Constraints and Possibilities

Reconciliation is proving to be a problematic concept for both practitioners and academics: it is laden with normative expectations and is often rejected by local publics. Ivor Sokolic and Denisa Kostovicova report on the exchange with civil society in Kosovo on reconciliation as activity. Participants shared their experiences of how interethnic contact between individuals through a variety of activities […]

What are transboundary crises and how can they be managed?

We ask Professor Martin Lodge about TransCrisis, a collaborative research project which has brought together experts from across Europe to assess the EU’s capacity to manage transboundary crises.

  • A black and white silhouette of power station chimneys belching out smoke
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    Anti-fossil fuel norms: a new frontier in climate change politics

Anti-fossil fuel norms: a new frontier in climate change politics

Fergus Green discusses his latest research in which he argues that major historic shifts in moral attitudes could inspire new ways of tackling climate change.

February 20th, 2018|Featured, PhD, Research|1 Comment|
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    Undergraduate Research Internships in the Department of Government

Undergraduate Research Internships in the Department of Government

In Summer 2017 the Department of Government ran its annual research internship scheme for undergraduates. The programme provides an opportunity for the Department’s BSc students to develop key skills by working with academic faculty on their research. We spoke to three of our undergraduate research interns about their experience working with faculty on research projects.

Tetsekela M. Anyiam-Osigwe assisted Ryan Jablonski with research projects […]