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    Low visibility of Latin American repositories in Google Scholar: technical incompatibility or lack of web strategy?

Low visibility of Latin American repositories in Google Scholar: technical incompatibility or lack of web strategy?

The content in many repositories in Latin America fail to come up in systematic searches largely due to the inadequate use of domain names and metadata schema, find Enrique Orduña-Malea and Emilio Delgado-López-Cózar. Institutional repositories are ultimately websites and concepts such as usability, information architecture, search engine optimization, among others, should be considered in their primary design. In a context like […]

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    The Impact Factor and Its Discontents: Reading list on controversies and shortcomings of the Journal Impact Factor.

The Impact Factor and Its Discontents: Reading list on controversies and shortcomings of the Journal Impact Factor.

Thomson Reuters have released the annual round of updates to their ranked list of journals by journal impact factor (JIF) in yesterday’s Journal Citation Reports. Impact Factors have come under increasing scrutiny in recent years for their lack of transparency and for misleading attempts at research assessment. Last year the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA) took a groundbreaking stance […]

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    Should self-citations be included or excluded from measures of academic performance?

Should self-citations be included or excluded from measures of academic performance?

There has been much discussion over how useful citation metrics, like Google Scholar’s H-index, really are and to what extent they can be gamed. Specifically there appears to be concern over the practice of self-citation as it varies widely between disciplines. So what should academics make of self-citations? Referring back to our Handbook on Maximising the Impact of Your […]

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    Twitter and blogs are not add-ons to academic research, but a simple reflection of the passion that underpins it.

Twitter and blogs are not add-ons to academic research, but a simple reflection of the passion that underpins it.

The role of the academic humanist has always been a public one – however mediated through teaching and publication, argues Tim Hitchcock. As central means to participate in public conversations, Twitter and blogging just make good academic sense. Hitchcock looks at how these new platforms are facilitating academic collaboration, teaching and public engagement. What starts as a blog, ends as an academic […]

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    Book Review: Intellectual Property Rights: Legal and Economic Challenges for Development

Book Review: Intellectual Property Rights: Legal and Economic Challenges for Development

This volume aims to address the effects of Intellectual Property Rights on the processes of innovation and innovation diffusion with respect to developing countries. Contributions cover ethical incentives for innovation, green innovation, and growth in agriculture. Catherine Easton writes that this collection has the potential to be innovative and influential.

This review originally appeared on LSE Review of Books.
Intellectual Property Rights: Legal and Economic Challenges […]

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    Scientific Misbehavior in Economics: Unacceptable research practice linked to perceived pressure to publish.

Scientific Misbehavior in Economics: Unacceptable research practice linked to perceived pressure to publish.

Upholding research integrity depends on our ability to understand the extent of misconduct. Sarah Necker describes her landmark study on economists’ research norms and practices. Fabrication, falsification and plagiarism are widely considered to be unjustifiable, but misbehaviour is still prevalent. For example, 1-3% of economists surveyed admit that they have accepted or offered gifts, money, or sex in exchange for […]

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    Disruption disrupted? As innovation comes to academia, scholars look to challenge Christensen’s compelling theory.

Disruption disrupted? As innovation comes to academia, scholars look to challenge Christensen’s compelling theory.

‘Disruptive Innovation’ has become a more practical than theoretical debate in higher education all while criticism mounts over the theory’s scholarly merits. In the midst of high-profile interrogation by academics, Eric Van de Velde reflects on his experience of the value of Christensen’s concept of disruption for information sharing and technological advancement in the scholarly community. The episode also poses […]

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    Working towards Sustainable Software for Science: on the creation, maintenance and evaluation of open-source software

Working towards Sustainable Software for Science: on the creation, maintenance and evaluation of open-source software

Alongside research papers and data, software is a vital research object. As more become confronted with its significance in the future of scientific discovery, a variety of opinions and philosophies are emerging over how to approach sustainable scientific software development. Matthew Turk provides background on his involvement in the Working towards Sustainable Software for Science: Practice and Experiences (WSSSPE) […]

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    Miseducation of Scholarly Communication: Beyond binaries and toward a transparent, information-rich publishing system

Miseducation of Scholarly Communication: Beyond binaries and toward a transparent, information-rich publishing system

The Society for Scholarly Publishing recently hosted a session on open access publishing and authors’ rights titled “Open Access Mandates and Open Access ‘Mandates’: How Much Control Should Authors Have over Their Work?” This post is the edited text from Micah Vandegrift’s talk along with his accompanying slides. Scholarly communication is mired in a binary, black and white system that […]

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    The Philosophy of Data Science (series) – Evelyn Ruppert: “Social consequences of Big Data are not being attended to”

The Philosophy of Data Science (series) – Evelyn Ruppert: “Social consequences of Big Data are not being attended to”

For the second interview in our Philosophy of Data Science series, Mark Carrigan interviews Evelyn Ruppert on creating an interdisciplinary forum to discuss the major changes in our relations to data, as subjects, citizens and researchers. The journal Big Data and Society will investigate how data is generated as a part of everyday digital practice and how it is curated, categorised, cleaned, […]

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    Across all fields, Open Access articles in Swedish repository have a higher citation rate than non-OA articles.

Across all fields, Open Access articles in Swedish repository have a higher citation rate than non-OA articles.

Due to differences in citation practices amongst scientific disciplines, existing research on a possible open access citation advantage remains limited. A new study seeks to overcome these limitations by investigating whether there is a possible OA citation advantage across all fields. Lars Kullman  presents his findings on cross-field citation comparisons between OA and non-OA articles from the Chalmers University of Technology self-archive repository. […]

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    Is the fear of metrics symptomatic of a deeper malaise? On fiefdoms and scapegoats of the academic community.

Is the fear of metrics symptomatic of a deeper malaise? On fiefdoms and scapegoats of the academic community.

This Monday marks the end of the open consultation for HEFCE’s Independent Review of the Role of Metrics in Research Assessment. Steve Fuller expands on his submission and also responds to other prominent critiques offered. He argues that academics, especially interdisciplinary scholars, should welcome the opportunity to approach the task of citation differently. Whilst many complain of the high citation rates […]

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    A modest proposal to solve the problem of peer review: Treat evaluation as an in-house publishing function.

A modest proposal to solve the problem of peer review: Treat evaluation as an in-house publishing function.

Peer review is under constant scrutiny due to its failure to adapt to a more effective model in the digital age. Steve Fuller argues that academic evaluation proceeds much too slowly for the quite simple reason that academics are valued mainly for being productive and not evaluative. It may be the job of publishers to rescue the academic brand […]

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    Reflections on the contemporary university: Reading List for Governing Academic Life #GAL2014

Reflections on the contemporary university: Reading List for Governing Academic Life #GAL2014

Changes to higher education, the role of neo-liberalism in academic life and the various social forces shaping researcher identity and practice are all set to be discussed and interrogated at the Governing Academic Life conference 25-26 June. To kick-start discussion ahead of the event we’ve pulled together a range of resources here on the topics to be explored over the two days. […]

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    A note to administrators and librarians: Those that fund research are responsible for funding its dissemination.

A note to administrators and librarians: Those that fund research are responsible for funding its dissemination.

Only when the bulk of research comes with funds to pay author-side fees will publishers feel comfortable moving to new open business models. But who should be responsible for paying these new author-side fees? Stuart Shieber argues that those that fund research should be held responsible for funding its dissemination. As funders of research, universities themselves should be looking to […]

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    Impact Round-Up 7th June: Prometheus gagged, Einstein’s peer review, and turning repositories into journals.

Impact Round-Up 7th June: Prometheus gagged, Einstein’s peer review, and turning repositories into journals.

Managing Editor Sierra Williams presents a round-up of popular stories from around the web on higher education, academic impact, and trends in scholarly communication.

This week the Times Higher Education reported on a stand-off between academic editorial board and commercial publisher. The journal Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation appears to have faced delays and unexplained edits from its publisher Taylor and Francis on content […]

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    Five Minutes with Anne Barron and Mary Evans: “Academics seldom have the opportunity to discuss issues about their profession”

Five Minutes with Anne Barron and Mary Evans: “Academics seldom have the opportunity to discuss issues about their profession”

To mark the thirtieth anniversary of the death of social theorist Michel Foucault, Anne Barron and Mary Evans have organised a conference in late June for academics to reflect on his legacy in relation to higher education. Governing Academic Life will create an interdisciplinary space to discuss the public university, neoliberalism, academic publishing, and assessment measurement. Managing Editor Sierra Williams […]

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    The right to read is the right to mine: Text and data mining copyright exceptions introduced in the UK.

The right to read is the right to mine: Text and data mining copyright exceptions introduced in the UK.

New copyright exceptions to text and data mining for non-commercial research have recently come into effect and this is welcome news for UK researchers and research, argues Ross Mounce. Here he provides a brief overview of the past issues discouraging text and data mining and the what the future holds now that these exceptions have been introduced. But despite […]

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    Data sharing may lead to some embarrassment but will ultimately improve scientific transparency and accuracy.

Data sharing may lead to some embarrassment but will ultimately improve scientific transparency and accuracy.

Open Data is important for science but in practice can be difficult for scientists afraid of the potential embarrassment of someone finding a mistake. Dorothy Bishop shares her own experience sharing her own data. When you share data you are forced to ensure it is accurate and properly documented. But she finds that error is inevitable and unavoidable in science, […]

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