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    Author survey data reveals changing perceptions of scholarly communication and wider participation in open access.

Author survey data reveals changing perceptions of scholarly communication and wider participation in open access.

Dan Penny, Head of Insights at Nature Publishing Group and Palgrave Macmillan, shares findings from the recent Author Insights Survey. The survey data is openly available and offers an extensive look into researcher perceptions and understandings of academic publishing. Few researchers are now unaware of open access. But perceptions of quality still remain a significant barrier to further OA involvement.

From Chinese […]

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    Stop shielding early-career researchers from open access – limiting wider involvement won’t change a broken system.

Stop shielding early-career researchers from open access – limiting wider involvement won’t change a broken system.

The competitive nature of scholarship and the precariousness of academic employment is what currently hinders early-career researchers, not open access publishing. Rather than warning researchers of the dangers of confronting outdated and proprietary forms of scholarship, all should be engaged in questioning the practices that perpetuate the broken system, argues Samuel Moore.

One of the frequently voiced criticisms of open-access […]

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    How to write a peer review to improve scholarship: Do unto others as you would wish them do unto you.

How to write a peer review to improve scholarship: Do unto others as you would wish them do unto you.

In academia, peer review functions as a quality-assurance mechanism which also aims to improve the scientific process as a whole. But few reviewers are provided with any training or mentoring on how to undertake a review. Hugh McLaughlin offers clarification on the process and the objective of peer review feedback and stresses the need for specific critical analysis for authors, […]

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    Amid mounting political and social uncertainty, institutions must evolve to support evidence-based decision-making.

Amid mounting political and social uncertainty, institutions must evolve to support evidence-based decision-making.

Knowledge exchange is a process often discussed in vague detail in relation to research impact. Chris Cvitanovic looks at the available exchange mechanisms for marine scientists and decision-makers. Survey findings suggest that while engaging with decision-makers was important to scientists on a personal level, a range of barriers prevent this from happening. Formal recognition of engagement activities and dedicated funding and resources […]

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    The Historian’s Altmetrics: How can we measure the impact of people in the past?

The Historian’s Altmetrics: How can we measure the impact of people in the past?

How can historians measure the influence of intellectual contribution over time? Scraping from online catalogs and employing a range of digital humanities tools, Michelle Moravec looks at women’s liberation scholarship and explores the relationships between authors and essays. It is important to critically examine why certain contributions appear in our web searches and others do not. In particular, she ponders […]

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    Pursuing a multidimensional path to research assessment – Elsevier’s approach to metrics

Pursuing a multidimensional path to research assessment – Elsevier’s approach to metrics

The Metric Tide report calls for the responsible use of metrics. As a supplier of data and metrics to the scholarly community, Elsevier supports this approach and agrees that metrics should support human judgment and not replace it, writes Peter Darroch. To be used effectively, there needs to be a broad range of metrics generated by academia and industry […]

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    The case against the journal article: The age of publisher authority is going, going, gone — and we’ll be just fine.

The case against the journal article: The age of publisher authority is going, going, gone — and we’ll be just fine.

Heidi Laine evaluates the often unsubstantiated claim that the journal article is central to the research communication process. Is a formal article really such a law of nature? She argues that the journal article (at least as we know it) will become a thing of the past. It will soon be replaced by article-style narrative reports, blogs, wikis, video and audio […]

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    Is withholding your data simply bad science, or should it fall under scientific misconduct?

Is withholding your data simply bad science, or should it fall under scientific misconduct?

A recent study sent data requests to 200 authors of economics articles where it was stated ‘data available upon request’. Most of the authors refused. What does the scientific community think about those withholding their data? Are they guilty of scientific misconduct? Nicole Janz argues that if you don’t share your data, you are breaking professional standards in research, and are […]

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    First among equals? Recommendations and guidelines for deciding who gets authorship credit.

First among equals? Recommendations and guidelines for deciding who gets authorship credit.

Across all disciplines, the course of determining authorship does not always run smoothly. Emma-Louise Aveling and Graham Martin argue that with funders pushing for wider collaboration, dilemmas about how to allocate authorship fairly is set to intensify. They present guidelines for research teams to consider. To ensure all decisions remain transparent, start discussions on authorship credit early on in the research process.

If there’s […]

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    How can universities increase Green Open Access? Article deposit rates soar after direct solicitation from library.

How can universities increase Green Open Access? Article deposit rates soar after direct solicitation from library.

Universities have struggled to increase article deposit rates for their institutional repositories. Regardless of citation benefits and top-down mandates, getting faculty to adjust publishing workflows does not happen overnight. At their institution, Michael Boock and Hui Zhang found that direct solicitation of author manuscripts has been the most effective method of reaching a higher deposit rate.

Authors who wish to provide open […]

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    Subscriptions no longer needed: flipping journals to Open Access while supporting existing OA publications

Subscriptions no longer needed: flipping journals to Open Access while supporting existing OA publications

The Open Library of Humanities is an open access publishing platform for the humanities and social sciences. Key to its growth will be to convince current journals to join the platform. Co-founder Martin Eve reflects on how this might work and the range of benefits for subscription and other high cost open-access journals in making the switch. Finding ways to move […]

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    Reputation instead of obligation: forging new policies to motivate academic data sharing.

Reputation instead of obligation: forging new policies to motivate academic data sharing.

Despite strong support from funding agencies and policy makers academic data sharing sees hardly any adoption among researchers. Current policies that try to foster academic data sharing fail, as they try to either motivate researchers to share for the common good or force researchers to publish their data. Instead, Dr Sascha Friesike, Benedikt Fecher, Marcel Hebing, and Stephanie Linek argue that […]

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    Elsevier’s new sharing policy is really a reversal of the rights of authors.

Elsevier’s new sharing policy is really a reversal of the rights of authors.

Virgina Barbour takes to task publishing giant Elsevier for their latest round of introduced restrictions on the sharing of academic research. Their new policy states that, if no article processing charge is paid, an author’s accepted version of the article cannot be made publicly available via their institution’s repository until after the embargo period, which can ranges from six months to […]

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    Passing Review: how the R-index aims to improve the peer-review system by quantifying reviewer contributions.

Passing Review: how the R-index aims to improve the peer-review system by quantifying reviewer contributions.

Peer review is flawed. Look no further than the storm of attention over sexist reviewer comments. A new index proposes a simple way to create transparency and quality control mechanisms. Shane Gero and Maurício Cantor believe that giving citable recognition to reviewers can improve the system by encouraging more participation but also higher quality, constructive input, without the need for a […]

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    Why perpetuate a 300-year-old anachronism? Reincarnating the research article into a ‘living document’.

Why perpetuate a 300-year-old anachronism? Reincarnating the research article into a ‘living document’.

Online publication provides us with new freedom to update, amend and extend the research article as we know it. Daniel Shanahan presents a vision of the evolution of the article beyond the limits of the printed page. Creating a living document for a single research project, updated in real time, would lead to it being evaluated based on the […]

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    Empirical analysis reveals significant discrepancy between journal reputation and perceived relevance in economics.

Empirical analysis reveals significant discrepancy between journal reputation and perceived relevance in economics.

Using survey data on the evaluations of 150 economics journals, a recent study explored the relationship between economics journals’ reputation and perceived relevance amongst economists working in the field. Justus Haucap shares some of the headline findings from the analysis based on the survey data. The findings suggest that a journal’s relevance is driven by average article quality, while reputation depends […]

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    How long does a scientific paper need to be? Length limits can have a detrimental effect on scientific reporting.

How long does a scientific paper need to be? Length limits can have a detrimental effect on scientific reporting.

In principle, length limits should help with the accessibility and readability of a scientific paper. But in practice these limits often achieve the opposite effect. Now that journals are becoming online-only, Dorothy Bishop argues, lengths limits are far less relevant. Yes, we should encourage authors to be succinct, but not so succinct that scientific communication is compromised.

There was an interesting exchange a […]

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    Data is King: Tracking internal performance metrics at your journal

Data is King: Tracking internal performance metrics at your journal

Academic journals can improve their publishing and review services by understanding the efficiency and effectiveness of their internal processes. Danielle Padula shares insights from a collection on academic journal management and identifies some key performance indicators that journal staff should be tracking. Authors could also consider these metrics when choosing the best outlet for their research.

If you’re like most editors, […]

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