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    Discovering Open Practices: one-day conference on open research information for PGRs and Early Career Researchers.

Discovering Open Practices: one-day conference on open research information for PGRs and Early Career Researchers.

The FOSTER project is currently looking at sustainable mechanisms to encourage wider adoption of open practices amongst EU researchers. A one day conference this Thursday in London will look to introduce key themes and wider considerations of open access for students and early career researchers. Lucy Ayre writes the aim of the afternoon is to show the practical steps, which complement […]

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    Book Review: Managing and Sharing Research Data: A Guide to Good Practice by Louise Corti et al.

Book Review: Managing and Sharing Research Data: A Guide to Good Practice by Louise Corti et al.

Research funders across the world are implementing data management and sharing policies to maximize openness of data, transparency and accountability of the research they support. This guide aims to cover guidance on how to plan your research using a data management checklist, how to format and organize data, and how to publish and cite data. This is a useful guide for students […]

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    STM’s new publishing licenses raise antitrust concerns amid wider efforts to pollute open access standards.

STM’s new publishing licenses raise antitrust concerns amid wider efforts to pollute open access standards.

Ariel Katz looks at the legal implications of STM’s move to release their own version of “open” licenses. As more and more authors consider the openness of a publication venue, publishers compete on this aspect. But by recommending STM members to adopt their specific licenses, will this limit competition? Whilst coordination amongst competitors is not by its nature illegal, antitrust […]

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    Crowd-Sourced Peer Review: Substitute or supplement for the current outdated system?

Crowd-Sourced Peer Review: Substitute or supplement for the current outdated system?

The problem with peer review today is that there is so much research being produced that there are not enough experts with enough time to peer-review it all. As we look to address this problem, issues of standards and hierarchy remain unsolved. Stevan Harnad wonders whether crowd-sourced peer review could match, exceed, or come close to the benchmark of […]

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    OpenCon to bring together students and early career researchers to advance Open Access, OER, and Open Data.

OpenCon to bring together students and early career researchers to advance Open Access, OER, and Open Data.

Recognition and awareness of how the next generation of scholars are transforming scholarly communication is well underway. Nick Shockey highlights OpenCon, a conference to take place in November aimed at mobilising support around open access, open educational resources and open data amongst early career researchers. Funding has been made available to cover travel to attend the conference in Washington DC […]

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    Impact Round-Up 16th August: Google Science, digital age knowledge creation, and scientific accountability.

Impact Round-Up 16th August: Google Science, digital age knowledge creation, and scientific accountability.

Managing Editor Sierra Williams presents a round-up of popular stories from around the web on higher education, academic impact, and trends in scholarly communication.
An exaggerated title given the piece itself confirms these rumours “are almost certainly a hoax”, but still, How ‘Google Science’ could transform academic publishing by Liat Clark at WIRED provides a helpful overview of the previous efforts made my Google to […]

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    Secrets of journal subscription prices: For-profit publishers charge libraries two to three times more than non-profits.

Secrets of journal subscription prices: For-profit publishers charge libraries two to three times more than non-profits.

Ted Bergstrom writes of his involvement requesting copies of library contracts with several major publishers in order to compare journal pricing data for bundled journal access. The significant differences that exist across universities for the same content and between publishers raises some major questions on the effectiveness of such pricing models. He finds that the differences in bundle prices depend largely […]

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    Impact Round-Up 9th August: Research recommendations, open data outcomes, and keeping open access simple.

Impact Round-Up 9th August: Research recommendations, open data outcomes, and keeping open access simple.

Managing Editor Sierra Williams presents a round-up of popular stories from around the web on higher education, academic impact, and trends in scholarly communication.

Jennifer Lin at PLOS announced an exciting new recommendations feature to be implemented across the PLOS journals in Diving into the haystack to make more hay? at the PLOS Tech Blog. Linking up with figshare, the Related Content tab on […]

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    Low visibility of Latin American repositories in Google Scholar: technical incompatibility or lack of web strategy?

Low visibility of Latin American repositories in Google Scholar: technical incompatibility or lack of web strategy?

The content in many repositories in Latin America fail to come up in systematic searches largely due to the inadequate use of domain names and metadata schema, find Enrique Orduña-Malea and Emilio Delgado-López-Cózar. Institutional repositories are ultimately websites and concepts such as usability, information architecture, search engine optimization, among others, should be considered in their primary design. In a context like […]

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    The Impact Factor and Its Discontents: Reading list on controversies and shortcomings of the Journal Impact Factor.

The Impact Factor and Its Discontents: Reading list on controversies and shortcomings of the Journal Impact Factor.

Thomson Reuters have released the annual round of updates to their ranked list of journals by journal impact factor (JIF) in yesterday’s Journal Citation Reports. Impact Factors have come under increasing scrutiny in recent years for their lack of transparency and for misleading attempts at research assessment. Last year the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA) took a groundbreaking stance […]

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    Should self-citations be included or excluded from measures of academic performance?

Should self-citations be included or excluded from measures of academic performance?

There has been much discussion over how useful citation metrics, like Google Scholar’s H-index, really are and to what extent they can be gamed. Specifically there appears to be concern over the practice of self-citation as it varies widely between disciplines. So what should academics make of self-citations? Referring back to our Handbook on Maximising the Impact of Your […]

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    Twitter and blogs are not add-ons to academic research, but a simple reflection of the passion that underpins it.

Twitter and blogs are not add-ons to academic research, but a simple reflection of the passion that underpins it.

The role of the academic humanist has always been a public one – however mediated through teaching and publication, argues Tim Hitchcock. As central means to participate in public conversations, Twitter and blogging just make good academic sense. Hitchcock looks at how these new platforms are facilitating academic collaboration, teaching and public engagement. What starts as a blog, ends as an academic […]

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    Book Review: Intellectual Property Rights: Legal and Economic Challenges for Development

Book Review: Intellectual Property Rights: Legal and Economic Challenges for Development

This volume aims to address the effects of Intellectual Property Rights on the processes of innovation and innovation diffusion with respect to developing countries. Contributions cover ethical incentives for innovation, green innovation, and growth in agriculture. Catherine Easton writes that this collection has the potential to be innovative and influential.

This review originally appeared on LSE Review of Books.
Intellectual Property Rights: Legal and Economic Challenges […]

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    Scientific Misbehavior in Economics: Unacceptable research practice linked to perceived pressure to publish.

Scientific Misbehavior in Economics: Unacceptable research practice linked to perceived pressure to publish.

Upholding research integrity depends on our ability to understand the extent of misconduct. Sarah Necker describes her landmark study on economists’ research norms and practices. Fabrication, falsification and plagiarism are widely considered to be unjustifiable, but misbehaviour is still prevalent. For example, 1-3% of economists surveyed admit that they have accepted or offered gifts, money, or sex in exchange for […]

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    Disruption disrupted? As innovation comes to academia, scholars look to challenge Christensen’s compelling theory.

Disruption disrupted? As innovation comes to academia, scholars look to challenge Christensen’s compelling theory.

‘Disruptive Innovation’ has become a more practical than theoretical debate in higher education all while criticism mounts over the theory’s scholarly merits. In the midst of high-profile interrogation by academics, Eric Van de Velde reflects on his experience of the value of Christensen’s concept of disruption for information sharing and technological advancement in the scholarly community. The episode also poses […]

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    Working towards Sustainable Software for Science: on the creation, maintenance and evaluation of open-source software

Working towards Sustainable Software for Science: on the creation, maintenance and evaluation of open-source software

Alongside research papers and data, software is a vital research object. As more become confronted with its significance in the future of scientific discovery, a variety of opinions and philosophies are emerging over how to approach sustainable scientific software development. Matthew Turk provides background on his involvement in the Working towards Sustainable Software for Science: Practice and Experiences (WSSSPE) […]

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    Miseducation of Scholarly Communication: Beyond binaries and toward a transparent, information-rich publishing system

Miseducation of Scholarly Communication: Beyond binaries and toward a transparent, information-rich publishing system

The Society for Scholarly Publishing recently hosted a session on open access publishing and authors’ rights titled “Open Access Mandates and Open Access ‘Mandates’: How Much Control Should Authors Have over Their Work?” This post is the edited text from Micah Vandegrift’s talk along with his accompanying slides. Scholarly communication is mired in a binary, black and white system that […]

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    The Philosophy of Data Science (series) – Evelyn Ruppert: “Social consequences of Big Data are not being attended to”

The Philosophy of Data Science (series) – Evelyn Ruppert: “Social consequences of Big Data are not being attended to”

For the second interview in our Philosophy of Data Science series, Mark Carrigan interviews Evelyn Ruppert on creating an interdisciplinary forum to discuss the major changes in our relations to data, as subjects, citizens and researchers. The journal Big Data and Society will investigate how data is generated as a part of everyday digital practice and how it is curated, categorised, cleaned, […]

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    Across all fields, Open Access articles in Swedish repository have a higher citation rate than non-OA articles.

Across all fields, Open Access articles in Swedish repository have a higher citation rate than non-OA articles.

Due to differences in citation practices amongst scientific disciplines, existing research on a possible open access citation advantage remains limited. A new study seeks to overcome these limitations by investigating whether there is a possible OA citation advantage across all fields. Lars Kullman  presents his findings on cross-field citation comparisons between OA and non-OA articles from the Chalmers University of Technology self-archive repository. […]

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