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    Putting hypotheses to the test: We must hold ourselves accountable to decisions made before we see the data.

Putting hypotheses to the test: We must hold ourselves accountable to decisions made before we see the data.

In the daily practice of doing research, it is easy to confuse what is being done. There is often confusion over whether a study is exploratory (hypothesis-generating) research or confirmatory (hypothesis-testing) research. By defining how a hypothesis or research question will be tested at the outset of research, preregistration eliminates this ambiguity. David Mellor outlines the value of preregistration for […]

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    Libraries and Open Journal Systems: Hosting and facilitating the creation of Open Access scholarship

Libraries and Open Journal Systems: Hosting and facilitating the creation of Open Access scholarship

There is a growing availability of free tools and software for academic publishing. How might libraries leverage existing platforms? Anna R. Craft describes one experience of an academic library hosting locally-produced open access journals through Open Journals Systems (OJS). But even “free” software is not without costs in relation to time and expertise. Care should be taken in facilitating a […]

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    Are scientific findings exaggerated? Study finds steady increase of superlatives in PubMed abstracts.

Are scientific findings exaggerated? Study finds steady increase of superlatives in PubMed abstracts.

Are scientists using language aimed at convincing editors and reviewers to publish their work? Joeri Tijdink, Christiaan Vinkers and Wim Otte present findings which suggest a rise in potentially exaggerated language. Potentially conflicting with the core values of science, the pressure to publish in high impact publications may be contributing to a paradigm of over-interpretation, overstatement and misreporting of scientific results.

Our perception […]

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    How to write a blogpost from your journal article in eleven easy steps.

How to write a blogpost from your journal article in eleven easy steps.

You’ve just published a research article – why should you bother writing a blog post about it? Patrick Dunleavy argues that if you’ve devoted months to writing the paper, dealing with comments, doing rewrites and hacking through the publishing process, why would you not spend the extra couple of hours crafting an accessible blogpost? Here he breaks down in eleven easy […]

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    Writing the introduction to a journal article: Say what the reader is going to encounter and why it is important.

Writing the introduction to a journal article: Say what the reader is going to encounter and why it is important.

An introduction has a lot of work to do in few words. Pat Thomson clarifies the core components of a journal article introduction and argues it should be thought of as a kind of mini-thesis statement, with the what, why and how of the argument spelled out in advance of the extended version. Writing a good introduction typically means “straightforward” […]

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    Five Minutes with Lambert Heller: “Do we need an open operating system of science?”

Five Minutes with Lambert Heller: “Do we need an open operating system of science?”

Publishing companies such as Elsevier are facing increasing criticism from scientists. And yet they do not only pursue antiquated models such as traditional journals – they are also working towards creating tomorrow’s “operating system of science”. For Lambert Heller the essential question is whether science will be capable of developing open alternatives to such a system.

This is an English version […]

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    Playing the (open) publishing game – Top Posts of 2015: Open Access

Playing the (open) publishing game – Top Posts of 2015: Open Access

What does Academia_edu’s success mean for Open Access? The data-driven world of search engines and social networking
With over 36 million visitors each month, the massive popularity of Academia.edu is uncontested. But posting on Academia.edu is far from being ethically and politically equivalent to using an institutional open access repository, argues Gary Hall. Academia.edu’s financial rationale rests on exploiting the data flows generated […]

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    Flipping journals to open: Rethinking publishing infrastructure in light of Lingua/Glossa case

Flipping journals to open: Rethinking publishing infrastructure in light of Lingua/Glossa case

The resignation of the editorial board of an Elsevier-owned linguistics journal and its open access reorganization could get the ball rolling for other journals to follow suit. Benedikt Fecher and Gert Wagner argue this case is a reminder that open access means more than just providing access to an article; it means rethinking the whole process of publishing. Open access also raises important questions about who owns the […]

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    Book Review: The Academic Book of the Future edited by Rebecca E. Lyons and Samantha J. Rayner

Book Review: The Academic Book of the Future edited by Rebecca E. Lyons and Samantha J. Rayner

Edited by Rebecca E. Lyons and Samantha J. Rayner, members of ‘The Academic Book of the Future’ investigative team, The Academic Book of the Future presents a short collection of essays by academics, publishers, booksellers and librarians ruminating on the future of the academic book. With the book published through the Palgrave Pivot initiative, Leah Tether welcomes its content and physical form […]

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    Applied Altmetrics: How university presses, academic publishing services and institutional repositories benefit.

Applied Altmetrics: How university presses, academic publishing services and institutional repositories benefit.

Academic institutions are increasingly looking for ways to demonstrate the value and breadth of their publishing activity. Danielle Padula and Catherine Williams look at how one university, the University of Michigan, have incorporated altmetrics data as an author service to help academic colleagues articulate institutional-wide successes.

A key benefit of altmetrics for younger or smaller publishers is that, unlike the Thomson Reuters’ […]

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    Top ten tips for getting your research the attention it deserves

Top ten tips for getting your research the attention it deserves

Altmetrics offer a record of the wider attention and engagement that academic work generates and these broad indicators can provide a helpful starting point for understanding the influence and impact of your research. Danielle Padula and Catherine Williams provide ten simple steps for researchers looking to boost online engagement and wider attention of academic research.

Authors are facing more competition than ever for funding […]

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    The arXiv cannot replace traditional publishing without addressing the standards of research assessment.

The arXiv cannot replace traditional publishing without addressing the standards of research assessment.

Jan van den Heuvel considers the vital role of discipline-specific repositories in the research process. The arXiv came into existence because it provided a solution to a very practical problem, namely publication time-lags. Recent developments like overlay journals suggest these platforms could play a bigger role in the publishing process, but as long as recruitment and promotion panels attach value to […]

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    Five Minutes with Professor Sonia Livingstone on the benefits of open access and institutional repositories.

Five Minutes with Professor Sonia Livingstone on the benefits of open access and institutional repositories.

Professor Sonia Livingstone shares her thoughts on the LSE’s institutional repository, LSE Research Online (LSERO). Since 2010, content in LSERO has received over six million downloads. For 2015, it has already received over one million downloads. LSERO is a rich resource containing a variety of LSE research, including journal articles, reports, book chapters, working papers, conference papers, datasets and video.

Do you […]

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    Making Open Access work: Clustering analysis of academic discourse suggests OA is still grappling with controversy.

Making Open Access work: Clustering analysis of academic discourse suggests OA is still grappling with controversy.

Open Access Week starts this Monday 19th October. In the run-up, Stephen Pinfield provides an overview of eighteen propositions on open access identified through an extensive analysis of the discourse. Key elements remain controversial. Particularly in relation to quality, researchers continue to view open access publishing with disinterest, suspicion and scepticism. It is clear that whilst OA has come a long […]

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    Exploring the publishing model of the Open Library of Humanities: A view from Latin America

Exploring the publishing model of the Open Library of Humanities: A view from Latin America

This week marks the launch of the greatly anticipated open access mega-journal, the Open Library of Humanities. Francisco Osorio provides a brief overview of what sets this journal project apart from the rest and how the new funding model offers an economic, social and technological platform for the humanities and social sciences to transition to open access. At the heart […]

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    Researchers are not ‘hoodwinked’ victims. All choose to play the publishing game and some can choose to change it.

Researchers are not ‘hoodwinked’ victims. All choose to play the publishing game and some can choose to change it.

Researchers are often cast as hapless victims in the scholarly communication system. Cameron Neylon argues their largely rational actions to demonstrate productivity are a choice and are also all part of the game they helped to create. Everyone is playing the game, publishers, researchers and funders, but that doesn’t mean that all the players have the same freedom to change it. It […]

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    To understand the replication crisis, imagine a world in which everything was published.

To understand the replication crisis, imagine a world in which everything was published.

Countering the claim that failed replications merely reflect the underlying truth of the scientific process and are not a matter of concern, Andrew Gelman argues that actually, the process is largely broken and we are in danger of dismissing the value of replication efforts. Current practice, centered on publication thresholds, is not filtering out poorly designed and executed studies.

John Snow points me […]

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    Wikipedia is significantly amplifying the impact of Open Access publications.

Wikipedia is significantly amplifying the impact of Open Access publications.

When you edit Wikipedia to include a claim, you are required to substantiate that edit by referencing a reliable source. According to a recent study, the single biggest predictor of a journal’s appearance in Wikipedia is its impact factor. One of the exciting findings, writes Eamon Duede, is that it appears Wikipedia editors are putting a premium on open access […]

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    Opening-up the early stages of research: new journal RIO to publish research proposals.

Opening-up the early stages of research: new journal RIO to publish research proposals.

Research Ideas & Outcomes (RIO) is the latest scholarly journal seeking to fix the broken scientific publishing system. It has been created specifically to enable and encourage the entire research cycle to be published, including research proposals and ideas. Founding editor Ross Mounce outlines what the journal seeks to achieve and how it will speed up the publishing process by eliminating […]

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