Book Reviews

In this section of the blog you can read reviews of all the latest books relevant to British politics and policy. Each Sunday we publish a review originating from the LSE Review of Books, aiming to cover a wide range of academic and non-academic books on all aspects of public policy and politics. Whether you’re interested in Benjamin Disraeli’s influence on David Cameron’s policies, the inside story of the Miliband Labour leadership battle, or the history of women in British politics since the 1700s, you’re sure to find all the essential information on these pages. Scroll down to browse the archive.

If you’d like to read more reviews of academic titles from across the social sciences, visit our sister blog, the LSE Review of Books. And if you’re interested in writing a review for the blog or if you would like to see your book reviewed here, please contact our our book reviews editor Amy Mollett at lsereviewofbooks@lse.ac.uk.

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    Long Read Review: Deplorable Me: The Alt-Right Comes to Power

Long Read Review: Deplorable Me: The Alt-Right Comes to Power

J.A Smith reflects on two recent books that help us to take stock of the election of President Donald Trump as part of the wider rise of the ‘alt-right’, questioning furthermore how the left today might contend with the emergence of those at one time termed ‘a basket of deplorables’.

Devil’s Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donald Trump and the Storming of […]

The Long Read: The Working Class Hasn’t Gone Away

Ron Johnston reviews three recent books that, in very different ways, explore the changing nature and politics of the working class in post-industrial societies.
The New Politics of Class: The Political Exclusion of the British Working Class. Geoffrey Evans and James Tilley. Oxford University Press. 2017.
The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality. Justin […]

Hate Speech and Democratic Citizenship by Eric Heinze

In Hate Speech and Democratic Citizenship, Eric Heinze argues for the unrestricted right to freedom of speech in contemporary democratic states, positioning it as one of the ‘legitimising expressive conditions’ of democratic citizenship. While some readers may take issue with Heinze’s particular conceptualisation of democracy and his account of the potential risks of hate speech, this is an important and […]

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    Book Review: Why the UK Voted for Brexit: David Cameron’s Great Miscalculation

Book Review: Why the UK Voted for Brexit: David Cameron’s Great Miscalculation

In Why the UK Voted for Brexit: David Cameron’s Great Miscalculation, Andrew Glencross offers an analysis of ‘Brexit’: the UK referendum vote on 23 June 2016 to leave the European Union. While the pace of developments since the book’s publication make some of its observations inevitably prematurely obsolete, this remains an important and historically sensitive account of this momentous event in the […]

Book Review: The Cabinet Office: 1916-2016

The Cabinet Office: 1916-2016, authored by Anthony Seldon with Jonathan Meakin, offers a detailed history of the Cabinet Office from its creation during World War I up to the present as well as the eleven Cabinet Secretaries that have served as part of this constant, if somewhat hidden, presence in the otherwise changing political landscape of the UK. The book […]

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    The Econocracy: The Perils of Leaving Economics to the Experts

The Econocracy: The Perils of Leaving Economics to the Experts

In The Econocracy: The Perils of Leaving Economics to the Experts, Joe Earle, Cahal Moran and Zach Ward-Perkins argue that the logic of economics has come to shape how political issues are framed and addressed, leading to a deep divide between economics ‘experts’ and the majority of citizens who have grown increasingly suspicious of the discipline. This concise and well-researched book […]

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    Red Ellen: The Life of Ellen Wilkinson, Socialist, Feminist, Internationalist

Red Ellen: The Life of Ellen Wilkinson, Socialist, Feminist, Internationalist

In Red Ellen: The Life of Ellen Wilkinson, Socialist, Feminist, Internationalist, Laura Beers presents a dynamic account of the life of Ellen Wilkinson, a working-class girl from Manchester turned humanitarian, campaigner and politician. Beers’s book offers an insight into Wilkinson’s sometimes controversial life and a period of British history when young people from all walks of life were driven […]

February 26th, 2017|Book Reviews, Featured|0 Comments|
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    The New Elizabethan Age: Culture, Society and National Identity after World War II

The New Elizabethan Age: Culture, Society and National Identity after World War II

In The New Elizabethan Age: Culture, Society and National Identity after World War II, editors Irene Morra and Rob Gossedge bring together contributors to explore the emergence of a cultural ‘new Elizabethanism’ following the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II at the start of the 1950s, which drew upon the historical example of the Elizabethans to express and channel a […]

February 19th, 2017|Book Reviews, Featured|2 Comments|