LSE Comment

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    Section 28, three decades on: the legacy of a homophobic law through the LSE Library’s collections

Section 28, three decades on: the legacy of a homophobic law through the LSE Library’s collections

Kevin Wilson, Heather Dawson, and Gillian Murphy discuss the controversial Section 28 clause that banned the promotion of homosexuality by UK local authorities 30 years ago this month, and highlight the LSE’s rich collections on the issue.

24 May 2018 marks the 30th anniversary of the Local Government Act 1988, which became notorious for its inclusion of Section 28. The […]

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    Tony Travers on what to look out for in today’s local elections

Tony Travers on what to look out for in today’s local elections

Today, 3 May 2018, local elections are being held across England. Tony Travers assesses what is at stake for the main parties in this election, and what the key benchmarks for success will be in terms of local results and national equivalent vote share.

Local elections in many countries are used as a ‘real world’ test of public opinion in […]

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    Local elections give a voice to migrants – and this could be bad news for the Conservatives in London

Local elections give a voice to migrants – and this could be bad news for the Conservatives in London

About a quarter of the population in the median London ward was born in a Commonwealth or EU country. At the same time, there is a negative relationship between the share of these migrants in the population and levels of support for the Conservative party across London. Joachim Wehner explains the potential implications.

The Brexit referendum created deep uncertainty about the […]

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    The labour of care: why we need an alternative political economy of social care

The labour of care: why we need an alternative political economy of social care

Caring is often taken for granted as an activity. But what happens when a social emotion is monetised? Insa Koch explains what the consequences are for those dispensing and those in receipt of care at a time of austerity politics, and in a legal system where female carers have never had the same rights and protections as their male […]

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    Many are mistaken about how much they personally stand to lose when trade is restricted

Many are mistaken about how much they personally stand to lose when trade is restricted

Both Theresa May and Donald Trump have adopted a narrative towards trade that departs from current arrangements. This narrative, promising unspecified economic gains at an unspecified time in the future, ignores the fact that trade restrictions will reduce policy options to protect jobs, resulting in greater domestic inequalities, writes Sarah Goff.

President Trump’s plan to impose tariffs on imported steel […]

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    Giving everyone some money, from birth to death: defining a Citizen’s Basic Income

Giving everyone some money, from birth to death: defining a Citizen’s Basic Income

Discussion of a Citizen’s Basic Income – an unconditional, nonwithdrawable income for every individual – is now a mainstream global social policy debate. But how would it work? Malcolm Torry explains the elements that make up this idea and underlines the importance of agreeing on a shared definition to be used by all involved in the debate.

A Citizen’s Basic […]

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    Should the law facilitate the removal of the children of terrorists and extremists from their care?

Should the law facilitate the removal of the children of terrorists and extremists from their care?

In light of the recent debate in the media about whether the children of those convicted of terrorist offences should be removed from their care, Fatima Ahdash draws on case law to explain why this is both a difficult and dangerous issue for family courts.

Mark Rowley, Assistant Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police and head of Counter-Terrorism policing recently called […]

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    William Beveridge’s sixth giant: environmental sustainability

William Beveridge’s sixth giant: environmental sustainability

Today, William Beveridge would worry about the environment, writes Sam Fankhauser. He reflects on the LSE’s Beveridge Festival and explains why environmental sustainability needs to be prioritised with the determination, leadership, and strong government commitment that Beveridge envisaged in 1942 – only this time at a global scale.

Squalor, ignorance, want, idleness, and disease. These are the five “giant evils” […]