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    Glass floors and slow growth: a recipe for deepening inequality and hampering social mobility

Glass floors and slow growth: a recipe for deepening inequality and hampering social mobility

Debates around inequality often focus on upward social mobility. But there is another side to the coin, write Abigail McKnight and Richard V. Reeves. Serious problems are being created by the fact that those from better-off families are protected from downward mobility, combined with slow economic growth and its impact on the creation of well-paid jobs.

Generations of British and […]

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    When unpaid childcare isn’t ‘work’: EU residency rights have gendered consequences

When unpaid childcare isn’t ‘work’: EU residency rights have gendered consequences

All EU migrants are not equal when it comes to residency rights, writes Isabel Shutes. The unpaid labour of women with young children, who take time out of paid work to look after them, is not recognised as “genuine and effective work” in EU case law. Consequently, they are at greater risk of losing their status as ‘workers’. Brexit negotiators must […]

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    If we want to improve social mobility, we have to address child poverty

If we want to improve social mobility, we have to address child poverty

Kerris Cooper and Kitty Stewart discuss evidence from their new report on the effect of financial resources on children’s development. They argue that the high quality evidence from the UK and other OECD and EU countries demonstrates that money in itself matters for children’s development, above and beyond associated factors such as worklessness.

A recent report by the Social Mobility […]

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    Value for money over value for people: how material politics can perpetuate inequality

Value for money over value for people: how material politics can perpetuate inequality

Social inequality in housing is a pressing issue that takes on a material dimension. To start tackling it, we need to rethink how we talk about housing and design, writes Mona Sloane. She explains how under current processes, attempts to improve the building stock often end up perpetuating wider social inequality.

The tragedy of Grenfell Tower continues to expose the […]

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    What is the role of overseas investors in the London new-build residential market?

What is the role of overseas investors in the London new-build residential market?

LSE London have just completed a study of the role of overseas investors in the London residential market for the Greater London Authority, looking at the proportion of new homes sold to buyers who live abroad and at the proportion of those homes left empty; and the contribution of overseas sales and finance to new development. They found that:

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    Why trying to understand GE2017 as “the young vs the old” is a bad idea

Why trying to understand GE2017 as “the young vs the old” is a bad idea

The outcome of the 2017 election is being interpreted along the lines of young vs old, each voting for their own interests. But focussing on the demographics and second-guessing their underlying opinions prevents us from focusing on the expression of those opinions directly – on the political programmes that people have chosen to endorse in this election, writes Jonathan White.

The […]

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    Britain’s surprising election: austerity and inequality make for angry and unpredictable voters

Britain’s surprising election: austerity and inequality make for angry and unpredictable voters

The unexpected result of the general election is just another case of voters punishing governments for their handling of the economy, writes Jonathan Hopkin. He argues citizens have had enough of an economic system that deliberately benefits only the few. Established political parties have failed to provide a vision for change, and so new political leaders who do so […]

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    How ‘groupthink’ in Theresa May’s Downing Street delivered another round of UK political chaos

How ‘groupthink’ in Theresa May’s Downing Street delivered another round of UK political chaos

The UK’s political turmoil has continued with the Conservatives’ disastrous 2017 campaign. But what led to the multiple miscalculations involved? Patrick Dunleavy argues that it forms part of a wider pattern of mis-governing from the centre of Whitehall that has characterized Theresa May’s leadership style from the outset.

All British Prime Ministers end their careers in failure. Either they are […]