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    Why it is too soon to know what David Willetts’ legacy will be

Why it is too soon to know what David Willetts’ legacy will be

Following David Willetts’ resignation as part of the UK government’s cabinet reshuffle, Greg Clark MP has today been announced as the new Minister for Universities and Science. Steven Jones looks at the flurry of comment taking place on Twitter about the reshuffle, the government’s higher education initiatives over the past four years, and what might prove to be the lasting legacy of […]

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July 16th, 2014|Featured, Impact|0 Comments|

The government’s Higher Education reforms have put the public infrastructure of teaching and research at serious risk

This academic year has seen the entry of the first cohort of undergraduate students under the new fees regime. In the first article of a British Politics and Policy special feature John Holmwood reflects on this new regime and the broader changes which brought it about, arguing that higher education has a enduring public value which is obscured within the […]

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The government’s plans for risk-based regulation for the higher education sector will encourage more risky and competitive behaviour among institutions, with potentially dire consequences.

One of the proposals of the government’s higher education White Paper is to introduce risk-based regulation of institutions, with the goal of reducing bureaucratic burdens and allowing universities to become more entrepreneurial. Roger King argues that while attractive on the surface, these reforms may drive some institutions towards highly risky behaviour, with potentially damaging consequences to the reputation of English […]

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The academic community agree that political campaign slogans such as the Big Society have no place in research council delivery plans: the AHRC must act now

Earlier this year it came to light that the Arts and Humanities Research Council may have been put under political pressure to include the Big Society in its delivery plan, or face losing its funding. Thom Brooks started a mass campaign to remove the Conservative party slogan from the AHRC delivery plan, and here argues that political campaign slogans have […]

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June 23rd, 2011|Thom Brooks|1 Comment|

Willetts u-turns on paying for university places, the Lib Dems are still unhappy, and the coalition turns one: round up of political blogs for 7 May – 13 May

Chris Gilson and Amy Mollett take a look at the week in political blogging The Coalition Paul Goodman at ConservativeHome says that victories in local elections and the AV referendum show that David Cameron is a winner, while Daniel Elton at Left Foot Forward says that these successes may give him a headache in 2015. Meanwhile, Mike Smithson at politicalbetting.com […]

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David Willetts’ blaming of feminism for male working class unemployment reveals the inner workings of the Tory mind: a hatred of the agency of women and the suspicion of progressive movements

Last Friday, the universities Minister David Willetts commented that women’s progress in the workplace has prevented working class men from attaining well-paid jobs, saying that “Feminism trumped egalitarianism”. Mary Evans critically unpacks these comments and says that not only are they ignorant and prejudiced, but they also show the deep suspicion of Conservatives to progressive movements.

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‘Social Mobility’ is now nonsense – especially in a time of cuts and income reduction

In recent decades, political parties have championed the concept of social mobility – but what does it really mean? Charlie Beckett finds recent discussions around the concept by the government and Labour to be confusing and unhelpful, and suggests that the term itself no longer has any meaning, especially in the current economic climate. I wonder if the words ‘social mobility’ should join @johnrentoul ‘s list […]

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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
This work by British Politics and Policy at LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.