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    Culture and two-way perspective-taking in research on autism

Culture and two-way perspective-taking in research on autism

A new study from Brett Heasman and Alex Gillespie has been published in Autism which highlights an important methodological and theoretical gap in understanding autistic social interactions.

Open Access paper accessible here: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1362361317708287

Autism is a lifelong developmental disability that affects how people connect and relate to others, and also impacts one’s sensory experience of the world (NAS, 2017b). For […]

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    ‘Space invaders’: Are smartphones really transforming parents and adolescents’ ways of communicating?

‘Space invaders’: Are smartphones really transforming parents and adolescents’ ways of communicating?

This post originally appeared on the ‘Parenting for a digital future’ blog from the Department of Media and Communications.
Marina Everri takes a closer look at the ways in which smartphones impact family life in Italy, and whether they are changing the ways in which parents and adolescents interact. Marina is a Marie Curie Research Fellow at the Department of […]

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    Podcast: The relationship between virtual experiences and social behaviour

Podcast: The relationship between virtual experiences and social behaviour

The relationship between virtual experiences and social behaviour has long held the fascination of researchers of social science, with studies exploring extensively its negative (e.g. aggression) and positive (e.g. learning) effects. With the development of the Oculus Rift and mobile technologies such as the Samsung Gear VR, the infrastructure for virtual experiences is becoming increasingly accessible in our daily […]

The psychology of communicating during a crisis

Dustin Eno, an alumni of the MSc in Social and Public Communication, shares his thoughts and experiences about working in the crisis communications industry.

Life is full of unexpected events, where unknowns can rapidly lead to fear, anger, and a need for a target to blame – a way of making sense of what has happened. In most cases, […]

The ‘ripple effect’ of driving behaviour

The Department of Social Psychology has completed a research project for the tyre company Goodyear, working through LSE Enterprise. Dr Chris Tennant discusses what the study revealed about the psychology of ‘ordinary, everyday’ drivers, and how they can get involved in antagonistic interactions with other drivers, (combative driving) and co-operative interactions with other drivers, (considerate driving).
Introduction

When negotiating road space […]

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    How to build an echoborg: PhD researcher Kevin Corti featured on the BBC

How to build an echoborg: PhD researcher Kevin Corti featured on the BBC

Research by Kevin Corti and Alex Gillespie on “echoborgs”, a hybrid social agent consisting of a real person who speaks words determined by a computer program, has been featured on the BBC website.

By Brett Heasman and Kevin Corti

In the race to develop artificial intelligence, echoborgs tell us much about our future relationship with machines, and how their communication can be […]

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    New MSc publication on how to advance the wellbeing of older people in disaster settings

New MSc publication on how to advance the wellbeing of older people in disaster settings

By Brett Heasman

Adding to the growing numbers of DSP MSc student publications in high impact journals, Mihoko Yotsui, who graduated with an MSc in Health, Community and Development in 2012/13 has just had her dissertation published in AGEING AND SOCIETY (Cambridge University Press, Impact Factor 1.3).

Miho’s paper explores the way in which social participation by elder people advanced […]

Challenging discourses of religious otherness

PhD student Teresa Whitney (LSE) and Dr Jawiria Naseem (UCL Institute of Education) discuss questions of identity and intergroup relations in advance of ‘Moving Beyond “Us” and “Them”‘conference at Cumberland Lodge.

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    Understanding teamwork and leadership: the role of self-construal

Understanding teamwork and leadership: the role of self-construal

Dr Ben Voyer discusses his latest research on how self-construals affect behaviour.

In my research, I study how self-construal can help us to understand how we behave in teams or act as leaders or followers. Self-construal is concerned with how individuals perceive themselves as being psychologically independent or interdependent from others. This tension between a desire to be unique, and […]

Claiming ‘multiculturalism has failed’ is dangerous

Recent terrorist attacks in Paris and Copenhagen have prompted some, including UKIP leader Nigel Farage, to point the finger at the supposed failure of multiculturalism. In this article, Caroline Howarth writes that these arguments by Farage and others are dangerous: they feed a powerful discourse that presents diversity, immigration and marginalised communities themselves as ‘the problem’, which may provoke hostility and violence.

In the wake […]

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This work by Psychology@LSE is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported.