Culture and civil society

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    Long read: Debunking myths on links between austerity and Brexit

Long read: Debunking myths on links between austerity and Brexit

Thiemo Fetzer (University of Warwick) addresses the misunderstandings and the criticisms of his widely-read 2018 paper “Did Austerity Cause Brexit?”. In August 2018 the Guardian Politics liveblog featured the headline: “Brexit is direct result of austerity and cuts like bedroom tax, research suggests.” The blog contained a set of graphs and paragraphs from his paper, which has since been accepted for publication in […]

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    Splendid isolation (again): Europe as narrated during the referendum campaign

Splendid isolation (again): Europe as narrated during the referendum campaign

Marzia Maccaferri (Goldsmiths, University of London) looks at how the press covered the referendum campaign and in the process revived notions of the ‘Anglosphere’ and British exceptionalism.

Historically, British public opinion has always turned to the newspapers at times of national significance, and the Brexit vote confirms this tendency. The traditional press, bolstered by online media, remains the principal indicator […]

The curve of inequality and the Brexit Way

Between 1976 and 2018, income inequality rose almost every year: the richest 0.1% now take 67 times the mean income. But this may have already begun to change as Brexit encourages the best-off to move elsewhere or reduce the value of their assets. Danny Dorling (University of Oxford) looks at how Leave-voting areas outside London will be worst hit […]

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    ‘Are they even aware that we can see them?’ Working-class Britons on Brexit politics

‘Are they even aware that we can see them?’ Working-class Britons on Brexit politics

Lisa Mckenzie (Durham University) revisits some of the people she talked to just after the referendum, and finds them very engaged with the politics of Brexit but more alienated than ever from ‘Westminster class’ politicking.

This is my fourth post for LSE Brexit – and after my last plea for solidarity and empathy, and a recognition that the damage of […]

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    Knowing Me, Not Knowing EU: how misunderstanding the EU means misunderstanding the UK (and makes it harder to leave)

Knowing Me, Not Knowing EU: how misunderstanding the EU means misunderstanding the UK (and makes it harder to leave)

As the EU’s infamous ‘awkward partner’, the UK has a rich history of not quite getting what it means to be European. The latest round of Brexit negotiations are no exception. Zoë Jay (University of Tasmania) explains why misunderstanding the EU means misunderstanding the UK, and that makes it harder to leave.

Continuing with his trademark flying-by-the-seat-of-his-pants approach to diplomacy, Prime […]

Talking with British People of Colour in the EU27

Brexit came as a shock to many Britons living in the EU27, but for many People of Colour, it confirmed their fears about the nature of British society and their experience of racism. Michaela Benson and Chantelle Lewis (Goldsmiths, University of London) argue that white Britons in the EU, suddenly confronted by the possible loss of their citizenship rights, […]

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    More in common: the emotional experience of Brexit in the eyes of generations

More in common: the emotional experience of Brexit in the eyes of generations

‘We are far more united and have far more in common with each other than things that divide us’, said Jo Cox. Hence, at a time when Remain and Leave positions are more salient than political ideology, it is critical to understand how people feel about politics. Simona Guerra (University of Leicester) writes about the emotional experience of Brexit in the […]

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    Referendums are not a simple cure for the EU’s democratic deficit

Referendums are not a simple cure for the EU’s democratic deficit

It is often argued that national referendums on EU matters can be a cure for the democratic deficit of the EU and its policies. But what can we learn from a country like Switzerland about how and when direct democracy works? Eva Thomann (University of Exeter), Isabelle Stadelmann-Steffen (Universität Bern), and Eva G. Heidbreder (Universität Magdeburg) conclude that referendums in […]

How Brexit reinvigorated the Welsh independence movement

A growing number of Welsh citizens now favour an independent Wales, thanks partly to Plaid Cymru’s decision to position itself as a Remain party. Jac Larner (Cardiff University) looks at how Welsh Labour has begun to question the country’s future as part of the UK, and discusses geographer Danny Dorling’s argument that English retirees living in Wales tipped the […]

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    From burdens to assets, and back again: shifting UK press portrayals of EU migrants

From burdens to assets, and back again: shifting UK press portrayals of EU migrants

During the referendum campaign, most national newspapers problematised free movement, only to emphasise the economic costs of ending it after the vote, finds James Morrison. Six months on, however, discourses framing migrants as ‘invaders’ or ‘exploiters’ resurfaced.

There’s nothing very surprising about an analysis of UK press coverage of European Union free movement which concludes that migrants have typically been […]