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Bethan Wilson

October 7th, 2020

Do good, feel good: how can volunteering boost your wellbeing?

5 comments

Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

Bethan Wilson

October 7th, 2020

Do good, feel good: how can volunteering boost your wellbeing?

5 comments

Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

World Mental Health Day 2020 could be the most important one yet, as across the world many have been effected by months of lock down, loss and the other effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. A focus on improving mental health and wellbeing in the population is key. The New Economics Forum define wellbeing as being understood as “how people feel and how they function, both on a personal and a social level, and how they evaluate their lives as a whole” and there’s many ways in which individuals can improve it.

What’s volunteering got to do with that? Well, research has found a positive link between wellbeing and volunteering; a relationship not newly founded, but recently explored and recognised.  The recent Time Well Spent study by NCVO (National Council for Voluntary Organisations) showed the relationship between perceived wellbeing and mental health factors and volunteering. They found that 77% of volunteers agreed that their volunteering experience improved their mental health and wellbeing in some way, particularly in the 18-24 year olds.

So how does volunteering increase and maintain positive wellbeing?

1. Giving

A great resource for looking at ways to improve your wellbeing generally is the NHS’s  5 steps to wellbeing, one of which is ‘Give’. Giving to others can bring about a sense of purpose to individuals and can stimulate the reward areas in the brain, in turn creating positive feelings. Volunteering is a perfect fit here, as giving your time for free to something you are passionate about is a great way to help out.

Give to others – even the smallest act can count, whether it’s a smile, a thank you or a kind word. Larger acts, such as volunteering at your local community centre, can improve your mental wellbeing and help you build new social networks.
NHS 5 Steps to Wellbeing

2. Reducing Loneliness

Whilst studies have previously focused on reducing loneliness in the elderly population, more recent surveys have found similar and higher rates in younger populations. The Time Well Spent survey reported that 68% of participants felt that volunteering reduced feelings of isolation, with 77% of 18-24 year olds agreeing. Connecting with others (see 1st step to wellbeing by the NHS) and reducing loneliness is shown to have a positive impact on wellbeing. This is especially key in younger age groups as the NCVO found out in their Community Life Survey, that 16-24 year olds are most likely to say they feel lonely all the time or often (8% in comparison to people aged 54-74 at 3%).

3. Increasing confidence

Mind UK, one of our amazing charity partners, outlines someone as having good mental wellbeing if they are able to ‘feel relatively confident in [themselves] and have positive self-esteem’ amongst other attributes. Again looking at the Time Well Spent report, 84% of 18-24 year olds found that their volunteering experience gave them more confidence. Here we can see another link in how volunteering might benefit an individual’s mental wellbeing. We (LSE Volunteer Centre) also found a similar relationship in our annual volunteering survey, where 64% felt that their volunteering experience increased their confidence!

 

So what does this mean?

Overall, volunteering has a positive impact on wellbeing and we now have the facts and figures to back it up. It should be used as part of a comprehensive, society wide approach to the current mental health crisis, along with policy changes and sufficient financial supplies. Whilst it may not be a ‘one-size-fits-all’ answer, it certainly highlights yet another reason for us, as a university volunteer centre, to promote volunteering to our student body. It also points us to a close partnership with LSE’s current wellbeing services.

Feeling Inspired?

If we’ve inspired you to volunteer, check out one of our other 200+ ongoing opportunities or book a one-to-one with David Coles, the Volunteer Centre Manager if you have more questions. If you are short on time, then take a look at the one-off opportunities that will return for Michaelmas Term 2019, organised by the LSE Volunteer Centre. And why not follow us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram to stay up-to-date with our events and opportunities and read our blog for more volunteering tips and stories.

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About the author

Bethan Wilson

Beth’s main responsibilities are working with a fantastic team of Student Volunteering Ambassadors and coordinating the centre’s marketing and communications. As an LSE alumni, Beth strives to put the LSE student experience at the heart of everything the Volunteer Centre does.

Posted In: Charity | International organisation | LSE Careers | NGO | Research | Volunteer Centre

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