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Andreas Brox

September 7th, 2022

Why you should change your mind about the start-up that invented the Covid vaccine

0 comments | 1 shares

Estimated reading time: 4 minutes

Andreas Brox

September 7th, 2022

Why you should change your mind about the start-up that invented the Covid vaccine

0 comments | 1 shares

Estimated reading time: 4 minutes

On the subject of COVID-19 vaccine inequity, MSc Development Management candidate Andreas Brox highlights the strategies used by German company BioNTech to block the production and distribution of its vaccine in the Global South. This piece was originally published on the Oxfam From Poverty to Power (fp2p) Blog and the full project can be found here.

It has been two years since this fricking pandemic has started and like everyone else, I am pretty sick of hearing about it. Thankfully, it feels very much like it is over in Germany, where I am from, or anywhere else in Europe. So, no need to bother about this Covid thing any more, right? There are other pressing issues, sadly, in this world right now anyways.

Well, I want to convince you to think about it one more time. I promise there is something you should know about BioNTech, the start-up whose success story of inventing the world’s most effective Covid vaccine everyone in Germany has heard many times before.

BioNTech Profits per minute vs doses of Covid vaccine delivered to low-income countries

The story usually told about BioNTech is the one of its two founders: the husband-and-wife Uğur Şahin and Özlem Türeci. It tells of Şahin’s foresight in spotting that the coronavirus would become a pandemic. And of his conviction that mRNA technology could be used to develop a vaccine. Both ‘proved prophetic’. German media has celebrated the couple as ‘world saviours’ and ‘heroes’.

Let me tell you a different story of BioNTech. As you will know, a shockingly low 15 percent of people in low-income countries are vaccinated. This is not news. But it continues to be an appalling reality. You wonder why? One reason: BioNTech has delivered less than 1 percent of its vaccines to these states. It is no coincidence. Poorer countries were being disadvantaged with ‘abusive’ conditions when distributing vaccines. Meanwhile, BioNTech is making profits of 23,400 Euros a minute.

BioNTech vaccine production

But the down-to-earth founders Şahin and Türeci are surely not all about the profits, are they? Şahin has said he wants to increase production in Africa, because it is so important to ending the pandemic. In an attention-catching announcement, he presented his solution: factories in sea containers that can easily be shipped around the world. Sounds great, no? Well, a WHO expert called the plan to simply drop these on a different continent ‘pure nonsense’.

The WHO itself is working to help African companies produce vaccines. Something BioNTech has refused to support. It argues that manufacturers in the Global South are not capable of producing their vaccine. This is simply false. A study found 120 companies in Africa, Asia and Latin America that could produce mRNA vaccines.

Instead of supporting other producers, Şahin’s company chose to actively undermine the efforts by the WHO. It hired a consultant, who spread false claims about the WHO project. A project supported with German taxpayers’ money. At the same time, they advertised BioNTech’s container factories. Not exactly what someone would do who only cares about ending this pandemic, is it?

Uğur Şahin and Özlem Türeci may be great inventors. But they are not world saviours! Their company BioNTech is actively working against ramping up vaccine production in Africa. They secure their own profits, not the world’s well-being.

Not surprising to you? Let this post remind you of this the next time you hear that ‘voluntary technology transfers’ are the key to ending the pandemic. It is time that the German government obliged producers to share their knowledge. Others have done so already: Moderna is sharing its vaccine recipe. And more than 100 countries are supporting a temporary suspension of the patents on vaccines. Among them the US and France. You think Germany can do the same? Tell your MP about it or share it online!

Countries supporting a vaccine patent waiver


The views expressed in this post are those of the author and do not reflect those of the International Development LSE blog or the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Image credit: Marco Verch on Flickr.

About the author

Andreas Brox

Andreas Brox is a 2021-22 MSc candidate in Development Management in the Department of International Development at LSE.

Posted In: Covid-19 | Current affairs | Inequality

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