Topical and Comment

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    Excluding the Excluded: What India’s refugee ‘law’ means for the Rohingyas

Excluding the Excluded: What India’s refugee ‘law’ means for the Rohingyas

Following the Rohingya Genocide Remembrance Day, the Government of India’s refugee policy, albeit non-existent, also remains largely exclusionary against the world’s most persecuted minority. Debanjana Paul and Vidushi Mehrotra explore legislative roadblocks, its translation into ad-hoc maltreatment of the Rohingyas and call for inclusive policy action to better support Rohingya asylum-seekers.

While approximately 40,000 Rohingyas are spread across six locations in India, […]

  • Permalink WFP Accelerator

photographed on May 16, 2019 in Munich.

Foto und Copyright: Joerg Koch/ WFP
joerg@joergkochfoto.de;
+49-175-1815173;Gallery

    We need to tell our own story: working as a Black humanitarian

We need to tell our own story: working as a Black humanitarian

Working as a Black professional within international development, Susan Sebatindira felt frustrated by the level of underrepresentation of Black people and People of Colour across the sector. She felt passionately about the importance in having a community that they could connect with, and showcase the work and realities of what it means to be Black development practitioner. Susan tells us about her […]

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    Temi Pratt in conversation with Stephanie Draper, CEO of Bond

Temi Pratt in conversation with Stephanie Draper, CEO of Bond

MSc Development Management student, Temi Pratt conducts an interview with Stephanie Draper, the CEO of Bond – the UK’s premier membership organisation for the international development sector, to discuss the current state of international development in the UK, the impact of Covid19 on the sector and gives advice to graduates seeking to enter the sector.

She advises graduates to look […]

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    Philosophical discipline for strengthening justice and solidarity through social innovation

Philosophical discipline for strengthening justice and solidarity through social innovation

In response to the COVID-19 crisis and rising injustices, LSE Alum, Vrinda Chopra proposes a lateral concept of social innovation through an approach based on ideas of unlearning, relearning and shared learning to deepen justice and solidarity in our development paradigms.

The moral dilemmas involved in the plight marginalized population groups as countries went into lockdown in response to COVID-19 ignited […]

Redefining power and influence in the post Covid-19 world

Incoming International Development PhD candidate, Ritika Arora argues that the metrics which measure how a country responds to threats of various kinds, should hold greater value in evaluating a country’s position of power, vis-à-vis their ability to attack and defend in traditional warfare, or their GDP. 

I recently found myself in conversation with a colleague about the inevitable shift in perceptions of power underpinning the international political economy, following the surge of COVID-19. Whilst […]

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    Zooming In With: Professor in Practice Duncan Green | Critical junctures and Covid-19

Zooming In With: Professor in Practice Duncan Green | Critical junctures and Covid-19

In this episode, tables turn and Professor Jean-Paul Faguet Zooms In with Professor in Practice, Duncan Green, to find out what he has been up to in lockdown and how his research relates to the Covid-19 pandemic. Professor Green tells us how his background in physics helps him understand structures of power between citizens and the state, and explains […]

Will Patents stop Covid drugs from saving lives?

Professor Kenneth Shadlen questions whether patents and the global race to develop vaccines and treatments for Covid-19 will hinder access to the products it generates. 

The Covid-19 pandemic has sparked a global race of public- and private-led research to develop vaccines and treatments. Will patents hinder access to the products it generates?

My summary? With regard to treatments (the dynamics around vaccines may […]

  • Permalink Satellite image from 12 November 2015, one week after the disaster.
Photograph: ©CNES 2015 Distribution Airbus DSGallery

    ‘Environmental’ catastrophes: an overview of the power relations behind the Mariana Dam Disaster in Brazil

‘Environmental’ catastrophes: an overview of the power relations behind the Mariana Dam Disaster in Brazil

On November 2015, the Mariana Dam burst and released up to 63 million cubic meters of toxic mud into the environment, causing irreversible damages in the States of Minas Gerais and Espírito Santo. The main narrative describes the disaster as an environmental one. However, this narrative risks to cloud important aspects related to social justice, development and dispossession practices. […]

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    Zooming In With: Professor Naila Kabeer | Social protection and Covid-19

Zooming In With: Professor Naila Kabeer | Social protection and Covid-19

Professor in Practice, Duncan Green, Zooms In with department scholars to find out what they’re up to in lockdown and how their research relates to the Covid-19 pandemic. The fifth Zooming In episode is with social economist, Professor Naila Kabeer who tells us how an interdisciplinary approach to economics helps her find answers to social problems, and why social protection could be a […]

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    An Ostromian Argument for Charter Cities: Institutional Resilience

An Ostromian Argument for Charter Cities: Institutional Resilience

MSc Development Management alum and University of Oxford PhD candidate, Kurtis Lockhart explains how institutional resilience is a key factor in poverty reduction, and examines how charter cities can help bolster institutional resilience in the Global South.

Effective institutions are a key factor in spurring long-run economic growth, which in turn has been responsible for lifting millions of the world’s poor […]