India

Because we let it happen

Development Studies student, Anushna Jha, shares a few lines in response to the horrific news of the brutal death of an 8 year old girl in her home country of India:
An 8-year-old was raped, tortured, killed
Because we let this happen
Because we have reduced cases of sexual violence to breaking news and primetime debates
Because we have normalised sexism and misogyny and […]

Supporting Early Stage Social-Enterprises in India

Social enterprises are on the rise in the Global South and India is one of the countries leading the way. Paroma Bhattacharya, Knowledge Management Consultant at UnLtd India and department alumni, tells us what her organisation looks for when investing in an enterprise hoping to have a positive impact in the world.

In recent times, there has been a rise in the number of social […]

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    Thomas Piketty on inequality in developing countries – Duncan Green

Thomas Piketty on inequality in developing countries – Duncan Green

I heard econ rock star Thomas Piketty speak for the first time last week – hugely enjoyable. The occasion was the annual conference of the LSE’s new International Inequalities Institute, with Piketty headlining. He was brilliant: original and funny, riffing off traditional France v Britain tensions, and reeling off memorable one liners: ‘meritocracy is a myth invented by winners’; […]

  • Stephanie Barrientos Professor at the University of Manchester.
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    Africa’s Turn to Industrialize? Shifting Global Value Chains, Industrial Policy and African Development

Africa’s Turn to Industrialize? Shifting Global Value Chains, Industrial Policy and African Development

On 3 May the department of International Development held a one day conference on Industrialisation in Africa. LSE Fellow Pritish Behuria reviews the day’s events.
After decades on the sidelines, industrial policy is now fashionable again. In the 1970s and 1980s, neoclassical economists including Anne Krueger launched an attack on the state, which forced the marginalization of discussions of industrial policy. In […]

May 10th, 2016|Events, Featured|0 Comments|
  • Graph And Stacks. Photo Credit: Ken Teegartin (https://www.flickr.com/photos/teegardin/6093690339/) License: Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0)
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    Life After LSE: How could Brexit help engagement with emerging economies?

Life After LSE: How could Brexit help engagement with emerging economies?

After graduating from the MSc Development Studies programme in December International Development alumna Bharthi Keshwara has gone on to a role as Economist at the Centre for Policy Studies. In this article she provides us with an overview of the work she’s been doing on Brexit and Britain’s relationship with emerging economies.
The share of UK exports destined for the EU […]

Limited liability… But Only for a Limited Few

Our students go on to a wide range of careers. Some work for NGOs, private companies or governments, others like MSc Development Studies Alumnus Kartik Misra undertake further study. Kartik is PhD candidate at University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and is researching the crisis of Indian agriculture. In this post he gives us an insight into some of the work he’s been doing.
The Limited Liability Act […]

  • The Old Building at The London School of Economics
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    LSE academics sign open letter to Vice-Chancellor of University of Hyderabad

LSE academics sign open letter to Vice-Chancellor of University of Hyderabad

LSE academics, including International Development Assistant Professor Sohini Kar, have joined colleagues  from across the globe in signing an open letter to the Vice-Chancellor of University of Hyderabad, expressing their shock and anguish following the suicide of a Dalit scholar, Rohith Vemula, and demanding that justice be done.
“We of the global scholarly community make an urgent appeal that justice be done […]

  • Poverty in Kerala. Photo credit: Silvia Masiero
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    What difference do remittances and migration make back home? Duncan Green selects from the Economist

What difference do remittances and migration make back home? Duncan Green selects from the Economist

Reading the Economist cover to cover is an illicit pleasure – it may be irritatingly smug and right wing, especially on anything about economic policy, but its coverage on international issues consistently goes way beyond standard news outlets. This week’s edition had everything from the changing face of Indian marriage to the spread of pedestrian and cycling schemes around the […]

Drug patenting in India – Ken Shadlen

Kenneth C. Shadlen and Bhaven N. Sampat, ‘Drug patenting in India: Looking back and looking forward’, Nature Reviews Drug Discovery, 14: 519-520. DOI: 10.1038/nrd4681 This open-access article is one of a series of papers Bhaven Sampat and I are writing as part of our ESRC-funded research on pharmaceutical patenting in the developing world. In this paper we sought to contrast two different explanations for […]

  • National Arts Fundraising (via Howard Lake, Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/howardlake/8166696568/) Licence: Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0)
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    Why is there no ‘Fundraisers Without Borders’? Big missing piece in development.

Why is there no ‘Fundraisers Without Borders’? Big missing piece in development.

There are an extraordinary number of ‘without borders’ organizations (see here, or an even longer list here) – every possible activity is catered for, from chemists to clowns (and that’s just the c’s). But one seems to be missing, and it may well be the most useful – why is there no ‘fundraisers without borders’? (Originally posted by Duncan Green […]