Ken Shadlen

Will Patents stop Covid drugs from saving lives?

Professor Kenneth Shadlen questions whether patents and the global race to develop vaccines and treatments for Covid-19 will hinder access to the products it generates. 

The Covid-19 pandemic has sparked a global race of public- and private-led research to develop vaccines and treatments. Will patents hinder access to the products it generates?

My summary? With regard to treatments (the dynamics around vaccines may […]

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    Zooming In With: Professor Ken Shadlen | IP, pharmaceuticals and a cure for Covid-19

Zooming In With: Professor Ken Shadlen | IP, pharmaceuticals and a cure for Covid-19

Professor in Practice, Duncan Green Zooms In with department scholars to find out what they’re up to in lockdown and how their research relates to the Covid-19 pandemic. The first Zooming In episode is with Head of Department, Professor Kenneth Shadlen, who sheds some light on the important role Intellectual Property plays in pharmaceuticals and how this feeds into the search […]

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    The costs of extending drug patent terms on Brazilian health system

The costs of extending drug patent terms on Brazilian health system

Professor Ken Shadlen looks at a recent paper co-written by incoming student in the Department of International Development, Eduardo Mercadante, that looks at the effects that slow patent examination of pharmaceuticals can have on the Brazilian Universal Health System (SUS). 

Patents provide monopolies for 20 years from the date of application. In Brazil, however, a unique provision of the patent law guarantees […]

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    Integrating science, technology and health policies in Brazil

Integrating science, technology and health policies in Brazil

Professor Ken Shadlen summaries a recent paper he, Elize Fonseca (FGV-Sao Paulo) and Francisco Bastos (FIOCRUZ) co-authored for the Journal of Latin American Studies, which looks at the role of public health professionals as agents of reform within the Ministry of Health in Brazil. 

Integrating the goals of improving health systems with initiatives to foster science and technological (S&T) development […]

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    Brazil’s Fight against Hepatitis C — Universalism, Local Production, and Patents

Brazil’s Fight against Hepatitis C — Universalism, Local Production, and Patents

In his recent short essay for the New England Journal of Medicine, Professor Ken Shadlen and co-authors examine three aspects of Brazili’s pioneering approach to the treatment of Hepatitis C virus (HCV). 

Brazil has been a pioneer in AIDS treatment, expanding access to key drugs and care. It has served as a model for other developing countries, showing that prevention and […]

February 14th, 2019|Featured, Publications|0 Comments|

The Future of AIDS Treatment: A Commentary

Professor Ken Shadlen provides a short commentary on Laurie Garrett’s short essay on the future of the AIDS pandemic, “Welcome to the Next Deadly AIDS Pandemic,” which was published in Foreign Policy last week.

As of 2000, less than five percent of people with HIV/AIDS in developing countries received treatment. Now, substantially greater than 50 percent receive antiretroviral therapy. What was a […]

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    Indian pharmaceutical patent prosecution: The changing role of Section 3(d)

Indian pharmaceutical patent prosecution: The changing role of Section 3(d)

Professor Kenneth Shadlen (LSE) and Dr Bhaven Sampat (Columbia University) have a new article on pharmaceutical patenting in India:

As elsewhere in the developing world, pharmaceutical patents are new in India, introduced because required by the World Trade Organization. India’s patent law includes a provision, Section 3(d), which tries to limit grant of “secondary” pharmaceutical patents, i.e. patents on new forms […]

The Problem with Trump’s “Protectionism”

President Trump announced that the US would apply tariffs of 10 percent and 25 percent on all imports of aluminium and steel, respectively. The announcement has been derided for being “protectionist” and damaging to the US economy, and likely to trigger a global “trade war.” Professor Ken Shadlen’s concerns lie elsewhere; the measures’ likely effects on the US economy can […]

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    Book Review: Coalitions and Compliance: The Political Economy of Pharmaceutical Patents in Latin America

Book Review: Coalitions and Compliance: The Political Economy of Pharmaceutical Patents in Latin America

In Coalitions and Compliance, Kenneth Shadlen, Professor of Development Studies and Head of Department in the Department of International Development, examines how international changes can reconfigure domestic politics. The book presents global changes in intellectual property, particularly regarding pharmaceutical patents, and the ensuing challenges for developing countries through a systematic comparative analysis of pharmaceutical patent politics in Latin America’s three largest countries […]

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    Promoting and Regulating Generic Medicines: Brazil in Comparative Perspective

Promoting and Regulating Generic Medicines: Brazil in Comparative Perspective

In a recent publication, Professor Ken Shadlen (along with Elize Fonseca), uses Brazil as a case study for a suggested typology to compare national approaches towards the promotion and regulation of generic drugs.  

Differences in countries’ practices with regard to “generic” drug regulation can have far-reaching implications on the supply of medicines and health outcomes. Generic drug regulations can promote (or restrict) competition and […]