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About the Media@LSE blog

The Media@LSE blog aims to encourage informed and insightful discussion around the vital role of media and communications in contemporary society, bringing our research and expertise to a wider audience that includes fellow academics, civil society, policy makers, journalists and the broader media industry, and other stakeholders.

Our concern is with inequalities, discrimination, representation, voice and violence in an unevenly media-saturated society. Blog content will broadly focus on the department’s key research themes, which are:

  1. Media Culture and Identities
  2. Media Participation and Politics 
  3. Communication Histories and Futures
  4. Communication Technology, Rights and Justice 

We seek to contribute to a better-informed public debate, to facilitate the sharing and exchange of knowledge between experts within and outside universities, and to open up the full richness of contemporary academic research so as to increase its perception and impact. We also seek to achieve a better understanding of how changes in media and communications shape, and are shaped by, social, cultural, political, economic and historical developments.

The central role of all LSE blogs is knowledge exchange. Each blog features academic insights and perspectives in accessible and intelligible formats aimed at citizens, journalists and policymakers. All our content is free and we encourage reuse of content through Creative Commons licensing. We are committed to forms of social science communication that are shorter, better, faster and free. But the blogs also seek to bridge the divide between academia and NGOs, think tanks, professions, pressure groups and a wide range of organisations interested in the topics and research we explore. We encourage the submission of well-argued and evidence-based material that can improve public and scholarly debate.

We have no editorial line except a commitment to communicating social science research and commentary in ways that enhance public debate and understanding. See our guidelines for contributors here.

Disclaimer

The views expressed on the Media@LSE blog reflect the views and opinions of individual contributors. The articles posted have been reviewed for content and seek to support academic integrity and dialogue. This blog does not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the London School of Economics and Political Science.

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