Economy and Society

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    David Cameron, David Beckham, and the UK’s social mobility problem

David Cameron, David Beckham, and the UK’s social mobility problem

Lee Elliot Major and Stephen Machin explain how Britain has become less mobile, particularly at the top and bottom of society.

One David was born in a terraced house in East London, his father a kitchen fitter, his mother a hairdresser. The other David grew up in an idyllic village in the English countryside, his father a stockbroker, his mother […]

1931: When British trade turned inward

In 1931, the UK imposed barriers that increased the Empire’s share of British trade and decreased its multilateral nature, write Alan de Bromhead, Alan Fernihough, Markus Lampe, and Kevin O’Rourke. Here they revisit the extent to which trade policy was responsible for the shift towards intra-imperial trade, but do so through adopting a new approach.

In a 2016 survey paper, […]

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    Changing patterns of violence in Glasgow and London: is there evidence of Scottish exceptionalism?

Changing patterns of violence in Glasgow and London: is there evidence of Scottish exceptionalism?

Susan McVie, Ellie Bates, and Rebecca Pillinger examine long-term change in violence within Greater London and the old Strathclyde region and ask whether there really is evidence of Scottish exceptionalism in patterns and trends in violence.

The recurrent press coverage of stabbings and gun crime in London acts as a sobering reminder that, even though violent crime across Britain as a whole […]

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    EU law empowers a big Green New Deal and state aid rules stop corporate welfare

EU law empowers a big Green New Deal and state aid rules stop corporate welfare

Membership of the EU stops arbitrary corporate welfare in the UK and expressly encourages aid for environmental protection, writes Ewan McGaughey. He explains how state aid rules work and how they empower the UK to get a New Green Deal. What stops us from changing the direction of the economy in this respect is therefore not the EU but […]

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    Restrictive immigration policies are in the pipeline – but the UK has already lost its charm

Restrictive immigration policies are in the pipeline – but the UK has already lost its charm

The prospect of Brexit has already made the UK a less attractive option for new EU migrants, according to the latest statistics. What is set to make the country an even less attractive destination is the government’s new immigration policy, writes Heather Rolfe.

As Theresa May faces a show-down in Parliament and tours the UK in a ‘charm offensive’, she […]

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    There is no left-wing case for Brexit: 21st century socialism requires transnational organization

There is no left-wing case for Brexit: 21st century socialism requires transnational organization

The contribution of traditional social democracy to the consolidation of neoliberalism in Europe illustrates the difficulties of developing a nationalist left alternative in the contemporary capitalist state, argues Lea Ypi. Contemporary socialism requires new ways of organising and must be transnational. Using the British case, she explains why neither Remain nor Leave fully capture the demands of the left.

The […]

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    The ‘cross-pressured clans’ of British politics: a quarter of the electorate and their values

The ‘cross-pressured clans’ of British politics: a quarter of the electorate and their values

Having explained how clusters of the electorate have shaped the UK political landscape, Paula Surridge, Michael Turner, Robert Struthers, and Clive McDonnell focus on two of the most ‘cross-pressured’ of these groups. They analyse their political behaviour in order to illustrate why understanding voters according to their values on multiple dimensions rather than on the traditional ‘left-right’ divide is […]

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    ‘Values clans’: how clusters of the electorate have shaped the political landscape

‘Values clans’: how clusters of the electorate have shaped the political landscape

To explain the divisions which permeate UK politics, Paula Surridge, Michael Turner, Robert Struthers, and Clive McDonnell introduce an approach that takes the dimensionality of voters’ preferences more seriously; and in a second piece they illustrate the political behaviour of two of these groups in more detail.

Our political parties are in disarray as they struggle to make sense of […]