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February 19th, 2013

“No country is more important than India” – LSE Director Professor Craig Calhoun

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Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

Editor

February 19th, 2013

“No country is more important than India” – LSE Director Professor Craig Calhoun

5 comments

Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

While visiting India, LSE Director Professor Craig Calhoun announces a new research programme on gender equality and 50 postgraduate scholarships for Indian students.

The London School of Economics and Political Science is to develop its highly regarded relationship with the Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS) in Mumbai to establish a major research programme on gender equality.

LSE’s relationship with TISS, established in 2007, has been supported by the Jamsetji Tata Trust, which has provided £1.8 million to fund joint research projects and the exchange of faculty members and PhD students between TISS and LSE’s India Observatory. LSE and TISS are working towards building on this collaboration with a focus on women’s issues.

The Tata Trust is keen to support a joint programme of research, advocacy and action to create a safe and enabling environment towards achieving gender equality in India. This programme involves an action research initiative that would input to strengthening existing public institutions and policy to respond to gender issues. This will involve further exchanges of research students, alongside the clear input into policy.

The School also announced 50 new scholarships for postgraduate Indian students. The LSE India Scholarships will enable students from India to study for a Master’s degree at LSE starting in 2013. The awards will range from £3,000 to £32,000, depending on financial need, and are open to all Indian students who hold an offer of a place on an LSE Master’s programme by 30 April 2013.

Speaking in Mumbai, LSE Director Professor Craig Calhoun said “LSE has enjoyed a strong relationship with India for over a century. This has included welcoming thousands of Indian students to study at the School during this time. We want to ensure that LSE’s doors are open to all talented students, regardless of financial circumstances, and are delighted to cement this relationship further by offering 50 scholarships, for graduate study, for students from India.”

With regards to the research collaboration with TISS, Professor Calhoun added: “No country is more important than India as the LSE works to make social science truly global. No issue is more important than gender equality as we work to bring research-based knowledge to major social challenges. We are delighted to continue our partnership with TISS and the Tata Trust.”

Lord Nicholas Stern, I.G Patel Professor of Economics and Economics and Government, said: “The relationship with TISS and the Tata Trust has already produced outstanding research work and facilitated numerous exchanges of research students. It is enabled by LSE’s association with the Tata family and Trust, which now dates back a century.”

Professor Parasuraman, Director, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, said: “This is an exciting development that promises to shed light on a vital area of social policy in India. The partnership between LSE and TISS has already proved fruitful and it is encouraging that it can now be developed further.”

Return to India At LSE for more updates about Professor Calhoun’s trip to India. 

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