Photo Essays

Why there is no PTSD in Afghanistan

In December 2015, photographer Magda Rakita and writer Mark de Rond travelled to Afghanistan to investigate how more than three decades of war and endemic violence has impacted the nation’s psyche. Here Professor de Rond discusses the neuro-psychiatric hospital they visited, and the lack of PTSD diagnoses. An LSE Arts exhibition of 16 images from the trip is on […]

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    Demonetisation and information poverty: Insights from slum areas in Bangalore and Mumbai

Demonetisation and information poverty: Insights from slum areas in Bangalore and Mumbai

Drawing on her ongoing fieldwork in slum areas of Bangalore and Mumbai, Silvia Masiero argues that information poverty increases hardship for the poor and vulnerable facing demonetisation. She observes, however, that the unbanked poor are those who hold the most valuable information about the real effects of the Government’s move towards a cashless economy.

Information, a highly valuable asset […]

December 5th, 2016|Corruption, Development, Economy, Featured, LSE, Photo Essays, Technology|Comments Off on Demonetisation and information poverty: Insights from slum areas in Bangalore and Mumbai|
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    The narrow focus on climate change in Bangladesh often reproduces exploitation and vulnerability rather than addressing it

The narrow focus on climate change in Bangladesh often reproduces exploitation and vulnerability rather than addressing it

Climate change has become the dominant frame for development thinking in Bangladesh, pushing aside almost every other environmental and social issue in the country. As a result, the structural causes of vulnerability are often internalised, normalised, and taken for granted. Meraz Mostafa and Pablo Bose write that rather than just “climate proofing” development efforts, the country needs to tackle […]

October 24th, 2016|Development, Environment, Featured, Photo Essays|Comments Off on The narrow focus on climate change in Bangladesh often reproduces exploitation and vulnerability rather than addressing it|
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    How would you change Pakistan? Crowdsourcing ideas from LSE students

How would you change Pakistan? Crowdsourcing ideas from LSE students

In the 2015-16 academic year  the LSE SU Pakistan Development Society ran a ‘Breaking Stereotypes’ photo campaign which provided students and staff with a thought-provoking taster of the inclusive debate culture that the society seeks to encourage. In this post, Raza Nazar discusses the recurring themes that cropped up in the campaign, and how they will be incorporated in […]

September 21st, 2016|Development, Education, Events, Featured, LSE, Photo Essays|Comments Off on How would you change Pakistan? Crowdsourcing ideas from LSE students|

Waiting for the moon: Anticipating Eid in an Indian village

This week, Muslims around the world are celebrating Eid-ul-Fitr. Reporting from her fieldsite in West Bengal, Lexi Aisbitt describes the excitement and anticipation as the community prepared for the festival and the end of fasting.

Tomorrow it is Eid. Or is it? On a sluggish Tuesday in a remote Muslim village in West Bengal, as the monsoon rains fall intermittently, […]

July 8th, 2016|Featured, Photo Essays, Society and Culture|Comments Off on Waiting for the moon: Anticipating Eid in an Indian village|

Tamil Jains: Fluid histories in stone

Tamil Jains, a minority indigenous to Tamil Nadu, face an uphill battle of protecting their unique heritage. The task has been undertaken disparately by the State, the community and NGOs. Mahima A. Jain writes on the challenges of protecting Jain heritage and attempts to reshape the historical narrative.

This is the second of two South Asia @ LSE articles by […]

The Tamil Jains: A minority within a minority

Once a flourishing community in the first millennium AD, the Tamil Jains are a largely forgotten entity in the 21st century. Mahima A. Jain outlines the everyday battles faced by this minority group and explains why they continue to lack economic and political agency despite being granted minority status in 2014.

On January 30, 2014, a century worth of efforts […]

  • Permalink Former Indian enclave residents carry torches and a Bangladesh flag as they take part in a procession at Dasiarchhara, Kurigram in Bangladesh on August 1, 2015Gallery

    The Indo-Bangladesh enclave exchange: Revealing conceptions of the state

The Indo-Bangladesh enclave exchange: Revealing conceptions of the state

At the beginning of this month, Mubashar Hasan visited an Indian enclave as it officially became part of Bangladesh following the Land Boundary Agreement signed two months ago. Speaking to people who had been stateless their whole lives, he finds that Bangladeshi citizenship holds multiple meanings for former enclave residents. Photos by Suvra Kanti Das.

As the clock struck midnight on August 1 2015, […]

August 28th, 2015|Featured, Photo Essays, Security and Foreign Policy|Comments Off on The Indo-Bangladesh enclave exchange: Revealing conceptions of the state|
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    For those whose livelihoods are intertwined with water, the monsoon is both desired and cursed

For those whose livelihoods are intertwined with water, the monsoon is both desired and cursed

Drawing on their field research in West Bengal, Lexi Aisbitt and Humaira Chowdhury offer an insight into the mixed blessing that is the monsoon for people with precarious livelihoods in eastern India. While the rains offer relief from the summer heat, nourishment to crops and a boost to water levels in the rivers and ponds used by fishermen, unpredictable climate […]

July 29th, 2015|Environment, Featured, Photo Essays|Comments Off on For those whose livelihoods are intertwined with water, the monsoon is both desired and cursed|
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    A View from the Border: Everyday lives in Burma’s conflict zones in times of transition

A View from the Border: Everyday lives in Burma’s conflict zones in times of transition

This week, a new photo exhibition opened at LSE with images taken by Hkun Lat, Hkun Li and David Brenner portraying the everyday lives of people in Burma’s conflict-ridden Kachin State. In this photo essay David Brenner offers selected images from the exhibition and an insight into their context.

The exhibition is open Monday 13 April – Friday 8 May 2015 (10am-8pm, Mon-Fri) in […]

April 15th, 2015|Featured, Photo Essays|Comments Off on A View from the Border: Everyday lives in Burma’s conflict zones in times of transition|

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