U.S. History

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    Book Review: The Price of Peace: Money, Democracy, and the Life of John Maynard Keynes by Zachary D. Carter

Book Review: The Price of Peace: Money, Democracy, and the Life of John Maynard Keynes by Zachary D. Carter

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In The Price of Peace: Money, Democracy, and the Life of John Maynard Keynes, Zachary D. Carter offers a new intellectual biography tracing the life and legacy of the influential economist, which argues that in the years since Keynes’s death, Keynesian economics has been stripped of Keynesian thought. Weaving together a dazzling array of Keynes’s private letters, journalistic works and academic research, […]

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    In 2020, US politics are once again a volatile cauldron. Both progress and disappointment are the likely result.

In 2020, US politics are once again a volatile cauldron. Both progress and disappointment are the likely result.

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“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…” Charles Dickens wrote the famous opening line of A Tale of Two Cities in 1859, but it feels very appropriate in the United States of 2020. But which of the two clauses deserves the most emphasis today? Ron Pruessen argues that history tells us that neither can […]

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    Book Review: Women’s War: Fighting and Surviving the American Civil War by Stephanie McCurry

Book Review: Women’s War: Fighting and Surviving the American Civil War by Stephanie McCurry

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In Women’s War: Fighting and Surviving the American Civil War, Stephanie McCurry challenges the tendency to position women outside of histories of conflict, examining the roles played by different groups of women during the US Civil War and its aftermath. The study collapses the gendered separation of war and women by positioning women as an integral part of military […]

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    Book Review: Billionaire Wilderness: The Ultra-Wealthy and the Remaking of the American West by Justin Farrell

Book Review: Billionaire Wilderness: The Ultra-Wealthy and the Remaking of the American West by Justin Farrell

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In Billionaire Wilderness: The Ultra-Wealthy and the Remaking of the American West, Justin Farrell examines the lives of the ultra-wealthy who make Teton County, Wyoming, the richest county in the United States, focusing on their views towards each other, the environment and the county’s working-class community. While this ambitious study raises more questions than it provides definite answers about […]

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    Long Read: As in 1968, in 2020 Americans face a defining choice

Long Read: As in 1968, in 2020 Americans face a defining choice

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More than fifty years ago a US presidential election was similarly marked by protests over racial inequality. Effie Pedaliu writes that in 1968, following the murders of Martin Luther King, Jr., and Robert F. Kennedy, Americans came face to face with the country’s inability to build an equitable and racially harmonious society, and chose the Republican, Richard Nixon to […]

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    There are signs that as president, Joe Biden could adopt a proactive human rights approach similar to Jimmy Carter’s

There are signs that as president, Joe Biden could adopt a proactive human rights approach similar to Jimmy Carter’s

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During the 2018-2019 academic year, Joss Harrison was an undergraduate research assistant with the US Centre. As part of his work, he investigated the human rights-orientated foreign policy of the Jimmy Carter administration. Building on this work, he writes that the foreign policy rhetoric of the Democratic presidential nominee, former Vice President Joe Biden, has shown some close parallels […]

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    The Ballpark Podcast Extra Innings: Black Republicans, Power and the Reagan Administration, interview with Professor Leah Wright Rigueur

The Ballpark Podcast Extra Innings: Black Republicans, Power and the Reagan Administration, interview with Professor Leah Wright Rigueur

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In this Extra Inning, Ballpark co-host Michaela Herrmann is joined by Professor Leah Wright Rigueur, who discusses the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) scandal of the 1980s, the experiences of Black Republicans in the last 50 years, the racial politics of the Reagan administration, and how #BlackLivesMatter protests can be linked back to long-standing trends like inequality and policing practices.

Professor Leah […]

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    Book Review: Set the Night on Fire: L.A. in the Sixties by Mike Davis and Jon Wiener

Book Review: Set the Night on Fire: L.A. in the Sixties by Mike Davis and Jon Wiener

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In Set the Night on Fire: L.A. in the Sixties, Mike Davis and Jon Wiener relocate the seeds of the radical 1960s away from New York City and Berkeley, California, centring the activism waged by African Americans, the Latinx community, Asian Americans, the LGBT community and women to ultimately redefine Los Angeles as the quintessential microcosm of paradigmatic change […]

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    The history of Puerto Rico shows that nationalism can be liberatory rather than xenophobic

The history of Puerto Rico shows that nationalism can be liberatory rather than xenophobic

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Since its founding in 1922, the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party has combined its goal of ending US rule with a push to reintegrate with sister republics throughout Latin America, and Latin American countries have often responded in kind. Despite undergoing many changes over the past hundred years, today’s movement remains broad and inclusive rather than restrictive and reactionary, writes […]

  • Permalink CAMP FOSTER, OKINAWA, Japan EA Marine provides security as helicopters land at the Defense AttachEOffice compound during Operation Frequent Wind, April 29, 1975. Military helicopters dropped Regimental Landing Team 4, the ground security component, at seven landing zones near the DAO compound, its headquarters building and annex. Once on the ground they moved to set up security positions. (Photo by Dirck Halstead) (released)Gallery

    Forty five years after the fall of Saigon, the Vietnam War still holds lessons for US foreign policy 

Forty five years after the fall of Saigon, the Vietnam War still holds lessons for US foreign policy 

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In late April 1975, the last remnants of the American presence in South Vietnam were removed as the North Vietnamese Army prepared to take over Saigon. Effie Pedaliu writes that even 45 years later, the fall of Saigon has lessons for US foreign policy, such as the need to plan an exit strategy in armed conflicts, and the importance of diplomacy for mending relationships between former […]

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