U.S. History

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    There are signs that as president, Joe Biden could adopt a proactive human rights approach similar to Jimmy Carter’s

There are signs that as president, Joe Biden could adopt a proactive human rights approach similar to Jimmy Carter’s

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During the 2018-2019 academic year, Joss Harrison was an undergraduate research assistant with the US Centre. As part of his work, he investigated the human rights-orientated foreign policy of the Jimmy Carter administration. Building on this work, he writes that the foreign policy rhetoric of the Democratic presidential nominee, former Vice President Joe Biden, has shown some close parallels […]

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    The Ballpark Podcast Extra Innings: Black Republicans, Power and the Reagan Administration, interview with Professor Leah Wright Rigueur

The Ballpark Podcast Extra Innings: Black Republicans, Power and the Reagan Administration, interview with Professor Leah Wright Rigueur

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In this Extra Inning, Ballpark co-host Michaela Herrmann is joined by Professor Leah Wright Rigueur, who discusses the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) scandal of the 1980s, the experiences of Black Republicans in the last 50 years, the racial politics of the Reagan administration, and how #BlackLivesMatter protests can be linked back to long-standing trends like inequality and policing practices.

Professor Leah […]

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    Book Review: Set the Night on Fire: L.A. in the Sixties by Mike Davis and Jon Wiener

Book Review: Set the Night on Fire: L.A. in the Sixties by Mike Davis and Jon Wiener

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In Set the Night on Fire: L.A. in the Sixties, Mike Davis and Jon Wiener relocate the seeds of the radical 1960s away from New York City and Berkeley, California, centring the activism waged by African Americans, the Latinx community, Asian Americans, the LGBT community and women to ultimately redefine Los Angeles as the quintessential microcosm of paradigmatic change […]

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    The history of Puerto Rico shows that nationalism can be liberatory rather than xenophobic

The history of Puerto Rico shows that nationalism can be liberatory rather than xenophobic

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Since its founding in 1922, the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party has combined its goal of ending US rule with a push to reintegrate with sister republics throughout Latin America, and Latin American countries have often responded in kind. Despite undergoing many changes over the past hundred years, today’s movement remains broad and inclusive rather than restrictive and reactionary, writes […]

  • Permalink CAMP FOSTER, OKINAWA, Japan EA Marine provides security as helicopters land at the Defense AttachEOffice compound during Operation Frequent Wind, April 29, 1975. Military helicopters dropped Regimental Landing Team 4, the ground security component, at seven landing zones near the DAO compound, its headquarters building and annex. Once on the ground they moved to set up security positions. (Photo by Dirck Halstead) (released)Gallery

    Forty five years after the fall of Saigon, the Vietnam War still holds lessons for US foreign policy 

Forty five years after the fall of Saigon, the Vietnam War still holds lessons for US foreign policy 

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In late April 1975, the last remnants of the American presence in South Vietnam were removed as the North Vietnamese Army prepared to take over Saigon. Effie Pedaliu writes that even 45 years later, the fall of Saigon has lessons for US foreign policy, such as the need to plan an exit strategy in armed conflicts, and the importance of diplomacy for mending relationships between former […]

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    Book Review: Sharing the Burden: The Armenian Question, Humanitarian Intervention and Anglo-American Visions of Global Order by Charlie Laderman

Book Review: Sharing the Burden: The Armenian Question, Humanitarian Intervention and Anglo-American Visions of Global Order by Charlie Laderman

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On 24 April each year, many communities across the world come together to commemorate the mass killing of the Armenian people of the Ottoman Empire during World War I. Grant Golub reviews Sharing the Burden: The Armenian Question, Humanitarian Intervention and Anglo-American Visions of Global Order, in which Charlie Laderman shows how the US and British responses to the atrocities were […]

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    Book Review: Horace Greeley: Print, Politics and the Failure of American Nationhood by James M. Lundberg

Book Review: Horace Greeley: Print, Politics and the Failure of American Nationhood by James M. Lundberg

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In Horace Greeley: Print, Politics and the Failure of American Nationhood, James M. Lundberg offers a new portrait of the nineteenth-century US public figure, Horace Greeley, the founder and editor of the New-York Tribune and an advocate for the anti-slavery North and emerging Republican Party. This rich history provides key insights into how the emergent conditions of American nationhood were both compelled […]

The Baldwin/Buckley Debate Of 1965, And How Baldwin Won It

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In this account, Joss Harrison looks back at one of the most powerful yet overlooked victories of the American civil rights movement. On Thursday 30 January 2020 at 6:30pm, the LSE US Centre is hosting the event James Baldwin vs. William F. Buckley: The Great Debate Over Race in America, which is free and open to all.  

Cambridge, 1965. James Baldwin, the renowned […]

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    Book Review: The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to the Civil War by Joanne Freeman

Book Review: The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to the Civil War by Joanne Freeman

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In The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to the Civil War, Joanne Freeman examines the increase of violence in the US Congress experienced from the 1830s to 1861 in the build-up to the US Civil War, a period that witnessed the rise of the mass political party and growing opposition to slavery and the power of the […]

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    For US presidents, egocentrism often comes with the territory. But Donald Trump’s narcissism is something new.

For US presidents, egocentrism often comes with the territory. But Donald Trump’s narcissism is something new.

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Donald Trump, self-styled “stable genius,” has outdone other US presidents in one respect, Ron Pruessen suggests. He has taken the sometimes valuable, sometimes problematic egotism routinely endemic to White House occupants and pathologized it into profoundly costly and dangerous narcissism.

It’s hard to avoid encountering the word “narcissist” in discussions of Donald Trump. One recent prompt: the president’s tweet about […]

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