Foreign policy

LSE Continental Breakfast 10: Brexit and multilateralism

Multilateral institutions – from the EU to NATO to the G-summits – are under strain. How does Brexit fit into this trend? Horatio Mortimer (LSE) reports on an expert discussion held at the LSE under Chatham House rules in June 2018.
Brexit, Germany and the multilateral system
Brexit is bad news for the EU, and perhaps especially for Germany, the EU’s largest and […]

Soft Rock: the power shifts in Madrid and London could help Gibraltar

Gibraltar’s border with Spain, and its economic dependence on financial services, mean it has a lot to lose from a hard Brexit. Chris Grocott (University of Leicester) looks at the implications of a new Spanish government and the departures of Boris Johnson and David Davis.

June’s change in the Spanish government has been welcomed in Gibraltar. The hard-line Partido Popular has been replaced by a coalition […]

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    The City’s pivot to China in a post-Brexit world: a uniquely vulnerable policy

The City’s pivot to China in a post-Brexit world: a uniquely vulnerable policy

To explain why trading European markets for Chinese is not a simple switch, Jeremy Green (University of Cambridge) examines the City of London Corporation’s role within economic policy-making, as well as the embrace of Chinese finance under the Coalition government.

These are extraordinarily turbulent times for the City of London. Over the past decade, it has faced two major challenges. From […]

When it comes to defence, Britain is trapped in a Cold War mindset

Britain’s willingness to join a new European defence force shows that Brexit need not mean an end to security co-operation with our neighbours. In fact, argues Tara McCormack (University of Leicester), it represents an opportunity to rethink ill-advised military actions and tactical support for wars led by geopolitical allies. Instead, some senior politicians remain obsessed by the desire to […]

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    Britain’s global negotiating position is weaker after the G7 Summit

Britain’s global negotiating position is weaker after the G7 Summit

The leaders of the G7 meet annually to affirm the strength of their relationships and chart the steps to further deepen their ties. The G7 is a key forum for the UK, as it is the only governance group that includes both the EU and the US, the two most important entities with whom the British government is negotiating […]

Latin America is a natural fit for Britain’s post-Brexit trade

Visiting South America, Boris Johnson has spoken of his optimism about a post-Brexit trade deal and co-operation with the region. Thomas Mills (Lancaster University) argues that the UK now has an important opportunity to realise its ‘Global Britain’ ambitions by building closer links with Latin America.

Boris Johnson’s recent tour of South America elicited rare media interest in Britain’s relations with Latin America. Speaking ahead of his […]

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    Mission impossible: calculating the economic costs of Brexit

Mission impossible: calculating the economic costs of Brexit

Much of the 2016 referendum debate focused on the costs involved in a potential Brexit. The ‘fatalists’ claimed that the losses would be huge and felt immediately after the UK had taken the decision to leave the EU. As time progressed, a more ‘moderate’ view prevailed postulating that the costs would not be instantly perceptible, but would crystallise only over […]

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    Europe’s Brexit: a successful outcome of negotiations for all?

Europe’s Brexit: a successful outcome of negotiations for all?

In writing about his recently edited book, Europe’s Brexit: EU Perspectives on Britain’s Vote to Leave, Tim Oliver draws out several key themes about how the other 27 Member States and EU institutions approached and continue to handle Brexit. The book’s major contribution is that it provides evidence about what would be a successful Brexit for all the parties […]

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    Permalink Donald Trump and Theresa May at the UN General Assembly, October 2017. Photo: <a>White House</a>. Public domainGallery

    The Anglo-American ‘special relationship’ in the post-Brexit era

The Anglo-American ‘special relationship’ in the post-Brexit era

Brexit is an opportunity to redefine the ‘special relationship’ based on trade and diplomacy rather than ill-conceived military campaigns, writes Thomas Mills (Lancaster University).

The Anglo-American ‘special relationship’ is never far from the surface in British political debate. So it proved in the EU referendum campaign of 2016. The most dramatic illustration of this was when Barack Obama weighed in on the side […]

Continental Breakfast 9: Can Brexit only mean exit? European foreign policy and security co-ordination

The EU has recently ramped up its Common Security and Defence Policy. Will the UK be able to maintain similar partnerships with the EU after Brexit? Sean M Deel (LSE) reports on an LSE Continental Breakfast discussion at Sciences Po, Paris on 28 March between leading thinkers in international relations and European politics, with contributions from policy makers and civil servants.

Continued deep ties in […]