Privacy & safety

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    In the furore over adults’ data being exploited by social media companies, who looks out for the kids? New survey shows parents want more protection for their teens

In the furore over adults’ data being exploited by social media companies, who looks out for the kids? New survey shows parents want more protection for their teens

The forthcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into force next month, and proposes that companies should gain parental consent before processing the personal data of children under a certain age. But what do parents think that age should be? In this blogpost, LSE’s Sonia Livingstone and Kjartan Ólafsson of the University of Akureyri present findings from a new UK survey of parents with […]

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    More clarity brings more confusion: what the European General Data Protection Regulations mean for UK children

More clarity brings more confusion: what the European General Data Protection Regulations mean for UK children

The debate around the upcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is leaving many questions unanswered. In this post, Sonia Livingstone and DaYoung Yoo reflect on the discussions surrounding the forthcoming regulations and what it will mean for children. Sonia is Professor of Social Psychology at LSE’s Department of Media and Communications and has more than 25 years of experience in media research […]

February 21st, 2018|Featured, On our minds|0 Comments|
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    Watching safely? Tools for protecting children in audiovisual services

Watching safely? Tools for protecting children in audiovisual services

Many countries have measures in place to protect children from harmful content. Although these vary from service to service, with a little effort, they could present useful tools for parents looking to create a safer environment for their children. In this post Lubos Kuklis summarises the aims and findings of the new ERGA report, Protection of minors in the […]

Introducing ideas of privacy while having fun

In this post, Bill Shribman describes his work in media literacy with the popular Ruff Ruffman: Humble Media Genius project and a parallel curriculum developed by Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society. He argues that although the parenting of children varies greatly, they still need to know the key issues raised by being online. Bill is a […]

Could a child sue their parents for sharenting?

Yesterday, the House of Lords debated the new Data Protection Bill which will update regulations about data processing. Focussing on children’s rights to privacy, Claire Bessant outlines the legal remedies a child who objects to parental sharenting might consider using to remove sharented information. She discusses confidence, Misuse of Private Information and Data Protection to show the complexity of protecting […]

October 11th, 2017|Featured, On our minds|2 Comments|

Under the limelight: Celebrity parents sharenting

This post explores sharenting as it relates to celebrity parents. Beyond the usual concerns of parents (over)sharing about their children online, for celebrities, sharenting can become a monetised practice where children are often used as the face of brands and campaigns.  Ana Jorge and Lidia Marôpo have studied the topic of children of celebrities since 2010, and suggest combining a rights-based […]

No, the internet is not actually stealing kids’ innocence

Is media use harmful to kids?  Sonia Livingstone reflects on ‘media panic’ that attributes issues such sexual assault to children using the internet, outlining problems with existing evidence and suggestions for future approaches. Sonia is Professor of Social Psychology at LSE’s Department of Media and Communications and has more than 25 years of experience in media research with a particular focus on children and […]

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    Some thoughts on the Atlantic’s ‘Have smartphones destroyed a generation?’

Some thoughts on the Atlantic’s ‘Have smartphones destroyed a generation?’

In this post, Vicky Rideout responds to the latest issue of The Atlantic which features an article linking teenage suicide to smartphone use. Vicky argues that to interpret the relationship between those two trends as causal is to misuse existing data. Presenting data that she gathered in a Common Sense Media nationally-representative survey, Vicky shows the nuance and complexity of the […]

Young people online: Encounters with inappropriate content

Last week there were a number of news reports about the harmful effects of social media on the mental health of teens and young people. Responding to this, we are publishing two posts this week that address the topic. First, this post by Rose Bray details the findings of the NSPCC and O2’s Net Aware research.

Investigating the nature of, […]

Sharenting – in whose interests?

In this post, Stacey Steinberg explores her own personal conflicts around ‘sharenting’.  Social media enable parents to share their parenting experiences, with their children’s rights to privacy often overlooked. Here, she discusses the tensions and problems it creates, as well as some proposed policy suggestions and a recommendation for a public health model. Stacey is a legal skills professor at the University […]