Public Services and the Welfare State

  • Permalink Gallery

    The gendered impact of austerity: Cuts are widening the poverty gap between women and men

The gendered impact of austerity: Cuts are widening the poverty gap between women and men

Ellie Mae MacDonald explains that women are disproportionately hit by the UK government’s austerity policies. She argues that many government policies, though seemingly gender-neutral, have profoundly gendered impacts. In particular, changes to Universal Credit and cuts to services and public-sector jobs have increased the number of women living in poverty relative to men.

Women are poorer than men. As a worldwide […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence: the betrayal of a whole generation?

Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence: the betrayal of a whole generation?

Is the Curriculum for Excellence in Scotland working? If not, can it be changed? Lindsay Paterson explains the reasons behind the recent disquiet and writes that although it may be a plausible culprit for the decline in students’ performance, the curriculum is so deeply embedded that removing it would cause enormous upheaval. And, since children get only one chance […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    If properly supported, local partnerships could help tackle radicalisation in UK communities

If properly supported, local partnerships could help tackle radicalisation in UK communities

Local partnership working helps not only detect, but also tackle radicalisation in a joined up way. But are these partnerships properly resourced and co-ordinated? Sue Roberts explains why, despite being vital, local multi-agency partnerships are being hindered by their unclear role and austerity cuts.

After the Manchester, London Bridge, Borough Market and Finsbury Park terrorist attacks in 2017, politicians and […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Universal Credit: a road paved with good intentions, but where is it leading us?

Universal Credit: a road paved with good intentions, but where is it leading us?

With all the debate and promises around Universal Credit, Abigail Davis writes that it is time to step back and ask ‘what kind of society do we want’? One that helps those in need or punishes them for not having enough? It is these answers that should ultimately guide decisions around what we call ‘benefits’.

It seemed like a good […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    The many ways in which Universal Credit could adversely affect family structures

The many ways in which Universal Credit could adversely affect family structures

The way Universal Credit has been designed is troubling, especially for couple households that will be paid a single monthly payment in one account. Yet while the difficulties of managing a monthly budget have been acknowledged, the idea has almost universally been lauded as a good one. Rita Griffiths explains the various reasons why this is not the case.

The […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Reforming modern employment: have the Conservatives done enough to become the party of workers?

Reforming modern employment: have the Conservatives done enough to become the party of workers?

Have the Conservatives fulfilled Theresa May’s pledge to become Britain’s workers’ party? Not as it currently stands, writes Tonia Novitz. She explains what the actual plight of British workers is, what steps have been taken by May’s government to address it, and why they fall short of what is needed.

Can the Tories can become ‘the workers’ party’? This was […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Britain’s social (in)security system: welfare conditionality and its impact on social citizenship

Britain’s social (in)security system: welfare conditionality and its impact on social citizenship

There is a stark disconnect between social citizenship as narrated from above, and social citizenship as it is lived from below, writes Ruth Patrick. She explains why we need to rethink how citizenship is experienced by those at the sharp end of the rapid escalation of welfare conditionality.

In today’s Britain, the idea of a welfare state and social security […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Ending shareholder monopoly: why workers’ votes promote good corporate governance

Ending shareholder monopoly: why workers’ votes promote good corporate governance

A consensus is emerging that votes at work promote good corporate governance, argues Ewan McGaughey. Here he outlines behavioural, qualitative and quantitative evidence, and explains that votes at work in Britain have among the longest, richest histories in the world.

The UK is about to stop shareholders monopolising votes for company boards, with worker voice. Currently, asset managers control most […]